Report on the NCCN Third Annual Patient Safety Summit

The issues of patient safety and preventing medical errors routinely make headlines, with reports of thousands of preventable deaths and costs in the billions of dollars per year. Far less noticeable, but potentially more important, is the work taking place on a daily basis to develop new systems and processes of safety and use of technology in the effort to reduce preventable adverse events. The NCCN Third Annual Patient Safety Summit examined 3 processes central to maintaining patient safety in the oncology setting: medication reconciliation, communication during patient hand-offs, and reporting of events, including “near-miss” events that do not reach a patient or result in harm. The NCCN Patient Safety Summit included a multidisciplinary audience of safety experts, clinicians, and hospital administrators from NCCN member institutions, with speakers from member institutions sharing clinical and practical experiences in implementing safety improvements. Common themes included transitions from paper to electronic systems, education and training for individuals and teams as new methods are put into place, and the need for all members of the multidisciplinary care team to recognize their impact on patient safety.

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Correspondence: Jennifer M. Hinkel, MSc, NCCN, 275 Commerce Drive, Suite 300, Fort Washington, PA 19034. E-mail: hinkel@nccn.org
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