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Noopur S. Raje, Andrew J. Yee and G. David Roodman

not curable, increasingly more patients are living with MM for longer periods as survival improves. The focus has centered on maximizing quality of life for patients with MM. Improvements in supportive care will allow patients to gain the benefit of

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Sharon Spencer

the practical aspects of dose delivery to a patient, successful outcome of patient treatments, and convenience to the staff delivering the treatment. Supportive Care All professionals caring for patients with H&N cancer should assess supportive

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Amy A. Kirkham, Kelcey A. Bland, Holly Wollmann, Alis Bonsignore, Don C. McKenzie, Cheri Van Patten, Karen A. Gelmon and Kristin Campbell

dietitians is limited. Although exercise training can be beneficial during and after treatment, intervention during chemotherapy may be especially important as supportive care in managing treatment-related side effects. With respect to exercise during

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supportive care were also examined. Results: nab-P was associated with significantly longer TTD than eribulin in HR+/HER2− MBC ( Table 1 ). Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) and antiemetics were used less with nab-P in both HR+/HER2− and TN MBC

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Michael H. Levy, Anthony Back, Costantino Benedetti, J. Andrew Billings, Susan Block, Barry Boston, Eduardo Bruera, Sydney Dy, Catherine Eberle, Kathleen M. Foley, Sloan Beth Karver, Sara J. Knight, Sumathi Misra, Christine S. Ritchie, David Spiegel, Linda Sutton, Susan Urba, Jamie H. Von Roenn and Sharon M. Weinstein

– 168 . 29 Levy MH . Supportive oncologypalliative care: what’s in a name? Semin Oncol 2005 ; 32 : 131 – 133 . 30 Khatcheressian J Cassel JB Lyckholm L . Improving palliative and supportive care in cancer patients . Oncology

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Paolo Marchetti, Raymond Voltz, Carmen Rubio, Didier Mayeur and Andreas Kopf

minutes), and variable frequency. Outcomes In a cohort of 208 patients with cancer admitted for oncology inpatient supportive care from May 2002 to May 2004, 38% had 1 to 2 severe symptoms at hospital admission, 31% had 3 to 4 severe symptoms, 22

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David C. Dale, Gordon C. McCarter, Jeffrey Crawford and Gary H. Lyman

Delivery of cancer chemotherapy is often limited by myelotoxicity, primarily neutropenia. As part of an effort to create a model to predict the risk of chemotherapy-induced neutropenia, we reviewed the reports of randomized clinical trials with more than 50 patients per arm in early-stage breast cancer (ESBC) and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL) published between 1990 and 2000. We observed that no hematologic toxicity data were reported in 39% and 34% of the ESBC and NHL trials, respectively. The remaining trials reported on hematologic toxicity in 16 different ways. When reported, rates of neutropenia, leukopenia, and hematotoxicity varied widely with the same and similar chemotherapy regimens. Dose-intensity data were not reported in 39% and 54% of ESBC and NHL trials, respectively. The majority of the remaining studies reported incomplete dose-intensity data such as percentages of patients completing all cycles or receiving a given percentage of planned dose intensity. Only 28% reported the mean or median relative dose intensity received by patients. Based on this review, we conclude that current practices for reporting chemotherapy treatments are inadequate for describing the risk of chemotherapy to patients or for quantitatively assessing the risk of treatment alternatives. We recommend that standard procedures for documenting and reporting hematologic toxicity and dose intensity in cancer chemotherapy trials be required for publication of chemotherapy trials.

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Shaji K. Kumar

. “Clinical trial designs are now incorporating MRD as a measurement, but it is not yet clear if MRD status should change therapy for current patients.” Supportive Care/Adjunctive Treatment Supportive care measures have helped improve outcomes for

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Peter L. Greenberg, Richard M. Stone, Aref Al-Kali, Stefan K. Barta, Rafael Bejar, John M. Bennett, Hetty Carraway, Carlos M. De Castro, H. Joachim Deeg, Amy E. DeZern, Amir T. Fathi, Olga Frankfurt, Karin Gaensler, Guillermo Garcia-Manero, Elizabeth A. Griffiths, David Head, Ruth Horsfall, Robert A. Johnson, Mark Juckett, Virginia M. Klimek, Rami Komrokji, Lisa A. Kujawski, Lori J. Maness, Margaret R. O'Donnell, Daniel A. Pollyea, Paul J. Shami, Brady L. Stein, Alison R. Walker, Peter Westervelt, Amer Zeidan, Dorothy A. Shead and Courtney Smith

approach is also important in deciding treatment options. Therapeutic options for MDS include supportive care, low-intensity therapy, high-intensity therapy including allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT), and participation in a clinical trial

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David G. Pfister, Kie-Kian Ang, David M. Brizel, Barbara A. Burtness, Paul M. Busse, Jimmy J. Caudell, Anthony J. Cmelak, A. Dimitrios Colevas, Frank Dunphy, David W. Eisele, Jill Gilbert, Maura L. Gillison, Robert I. Haddad, Bruce H. Haughey, Wesley L. Hicks Jr, Ying J. Hitchcock, Merrill S. Kies, William M. Lydiatt, Ellie Maghami, Renato Martins, Thomas McCaffrey, Bharat B. Mittal, Harlan A. Pinto, John A. Ridge, Sandeep Samant, David E. Schuller, Jatin P. Shah, Sharon Spencer, Randal S. Weber, Gregory T. Wolf, Frank Worden, Sue S. Yom, Nicole R. McMillian and Miranda Hughes

A new section on “Principles of Nutrition” was recently added to the NCCN Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology (NCCN Guidelines) for Head and Neck Cancers. This new section outlines the management of nutrition and supportive care for patients