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Philip E. Johnson, George Dahlman, Kirby Eng, Rekha Garg, Scott Gottlieb, James M. Hoffman, Peyton Howell, Mohammad Jahanzeb, Shirley Johnson, Emily Mackler, Mark Rubino, Brenda Sarokhan, F. Marc Stewart, Tim Tyler, Julie M. Vose, Sharon Weinstein, Edward C. Li and Jessica DeMartino

Executive Summary Managing drug safety and developing drug safety systems is an ongoing, critically important challenge for all involved in manufacturing drugs, regulating drug use, prescribing drugs, dispensing drugs, and consuming drugs. Risk

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Arvind Bambhroliya, Mariana Chavez-MacGregor and Abenaa M. Brewster

cancer risk reduction medications Explain several strategies to educate women on breast cancer risk and risk reduction strategies Identify research areas to improve the use of risk reduction medication for women who are at high risk for breast cancer

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Therese B. Bevers, John H. Ward, Banu K. Arun, Graham A. Colditz, Kenneth H. Cowan, Mary B. Daly, Judy E. Garber, Mary L. Gemignani, William J. Gradishar, Judith A. Jordan, Larissa A. Korde, Nicole Kounalakis, Helen Krontiras, Shicha Kumar, Allison Kurian, Christine Laronga, Rachel M. Layman, Loretta S. Loftus, Martin C. Mahoney, Sofia D. Merajver, Ingrid M. Meszoely, Joanne Mortimer, Lisa Newman, Elizabeth Pritchard, Sandhya Pruthi, Victoria Seewaldt, Michelle C. Specht, Kala Visvanathan, Anne Wallace, Mary Ann Bergman and Rashmi Kumar

breast cancer screening and risk reduction strategies. For women without a personal history of breast cancer, risk factors for its development can be grouped into categories, including familial/genetic factors; factors related to age, demographics

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Kaylene Ready and Banu Arun

B reast cancer is the most common cancer among women in the United States with a lifetime risk of 1 in 8 (12%). 1 Multiple risk factors for breast cancer have been identified and include gender, age, race, benign breast disease (atypical ductal

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Therese B. Bevers, Deborah K. Armstrong, Banu Arun, Robert W. Carlson, Kenneth H. Cowan, Mary B. Daly, Irvin Fleming, Judy E. Garber, Mary Gemignani, William J. Gradishar, Helen Krontiras, Swati Kulkarni, Christine Laronga, Loretta Loftus, Deborah J. MacDonald, Martin C. Mahoney, Sofia D. Merajver, Ingrid Meszoely, Lisa Newman, Elizabeth Pritchard, Victoria Seewaldt, Rena V. Sellin, Charles L. Shapiro and John H. Ward

the United States in 2010. 1 Risk factors for the development of breast cancer can be grouped into categories, including familial/genetic factors (family history, known or suspected BRCA1/2, TP53, PTEN , or other gene mutation associated with breast

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George Rodrigues, Himu Lukka, Padraig Warde, Michael Brundage, Luis Souhami, Juanita Crook, Fabio Cury, Charles Catton, Gary Mok, Andre-Guy Martin, Eric Vigneault, Jim Morris, Andrew Warner, Sandra Gonzalez Maldonado, Tom Pickles and the Genitourinary Radiation Oncologists of Canada (GUROC)

The management of nonmetastatic prostate cancer is complex because of the interplay of multiple considerations, including risk stratification, relative treatment efficacy/toxicity, competing risk of death from cancer versus other causes, and

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Alok A. Khorana

.medscape.org/journal/jnccn ; (4) view/print certificate. Release date: July 5, 2011; Expiration date: July 5, 2012 Learning Objectives Upon completion of this activity, participants will be able to: Describe clinical risk factors for VTE in cancer, based on a review Describe

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Mary B. Daly, Robert Pilarski, Jennifer E. Axilbund, Saundra S. Buys, Beth Crawford, Susan Friedman, Judy E. Garber, Carolyn Horton, Virginia Kaklamani, Catherine Klein, Wendy Kohlmann, Allison Kurian, Jennifer Litton, Lisa Madlensky, P. Kelly Marcom, Sofia D. Merajver, Kenneth Offit, Tuya Pal, Boris Pasche, Gwen Reiser, Kristen Mahoney Shannon, Elizabeth Swisher, Nicoleta C. Voian, Jeffrey N. Weitzel, Alison Whelan, Georgia L. Wiesner, Mary A. Dwyer and Rashmi Kumar

somatic/tumor cells only, and de novo mutations can occur for the first time in a germ cell (ie, egg or sperm) or in the fertilized egg itself during early embryogenesis. However, family studies have long documented an increased risk of several forms of

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Dawn Provenzale, Samir Gupta, Dennis J. Ahnen, Travis Bray, Jamie A. Cannon, Gregory Cooper, Donald S. David, Dayna S. Early, Deborah Erwin, James M. Ford, Francis M. Giardiello, William Grady, Amy L. Halverson, Stanley R. Hamilton, Heather Hampel, Mohammad K. Ismail, Jason B. Klapman, David W. Larson, Audrey J. Lazenby, Patrick M. Lynch, Robert J. Mayer, Reid M. Ness, Scott E. Regenbogen, Niloy Jewel Samadder, Moshe Shike, Gideon Steinbach, David Weinberg, Mary Dwyer and Susan Darlow

-Riley-Ruvalcaba, Peutz-Jeghers, juvenile polyposis, and serrated polyposis syndromes (SPS). 2 - 4 Criteria for Further Risk Evaluation for High-Risk Syndromes NCCN criteria for further risk evaluation for hereditary syndromes associated with CRC include a known

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Mary B. Daly, Jennifer E. Axilbund, Saundra Buys, Beth Crawford, Carolyn D. Farrell, Susan Friedman, Judy E. Garber, Salil Goorha, Stephen B. Gruber, Heather Hampel, Virginia Kaklamani, Wendy Kohlmann, Allison Kurian, Jennifer Litton, P. Kelly Marcom, Robert Nussbaum, Kenneth Offit, Tuya Pal, Boris Pasche, Robert Pilarski, Gwen Reiser, Kristen Mahoney Shannon, Jeffrey R. Smith, Elizabeth Swisher and Jeffrey N. Weitzel

mutations can occur in somatic/tumor cells only, and de novo mutations can occur for the first time in a germ cell (i.e., egg or sperm) or in the fertilized egg itself during early embryogenesis. However, family studies have long documented an increased risk