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Neal J. Meropol, Joanne S. Buzaglo, Jennifer Millard, Nevena Damjanov, Suzanne M. Miller, Caroline Ridgway, Eric A. Ross, John D. Sprandio and Perry Watts

. Can J Urol 2005 ; 12 : 2607 – 2613 . 46. Meropol NJ . Meropol, NJ: Health Services Research Poster Discussion Session: 2005 ASCO Annual Meeting . Orlando, FL. May 16, 2005. Available at : http://www.asco.org/ac/1

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David J. Worhunsky, Yifei Ma, Yulia Zak, George A. Poultsides, Jeffrey A. Norton, Kim F. Rhoads and Brendan C. Visser

studies are needed to elucidate whether these differences exist for other cancers, and to determine the full implications these differences may have on health services research. The authors have disclosed that they

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Robert B. Hines, Alina Barrett, Philip Twumasi-Ankrah, Dominique Broccoli, Kimberly K. Engelman, Joaquina Baranda, Elizabeth A. Ablah, Lisette Jacobson, Michelle Redmond, Wei Tu and Tracie C. Collins

overall survival after CRC diagnosis. The results of this study seek to identify patient characteristics that are associated with NCCN Guidelines nonadherence and quantify its prognostic impact on survival. Health services research on the quality of care

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Yvonne Bombard, Peter B. Bach and Kenneth Offit

, health outcomes, cost-effectiveness, and health services research. The efficacy of genomic-based interventions may be difficult to demonstrate, especially for stratified technologies and in the hereditary disease context, in which sample size is often an

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Rodger J. Winn

For most of us, acquiring knowledge has been a fairly linear, unidirectional process—monolithic (and increasingly heavy) textbooks; graphically sophisticated, slide-supported lectures; journal articles multiplying logarithmically—we absorb and then apply. Certainly our patients have benefited from the avalanche of data and evidence that threatens to overwhelm us. Technology transfer is rapid, and thanks to the Internet and the post office, the results of carefully designed and meticulously implemented clinical trials are widely available and are easily accessed. Unfortunately, the slightly darker side of this process comes in the finding of health services researchers that education per se does not necessarily lead to the adoption of new standards and the “tell them you have built it and they will come” approach frequently does not attract players to the field. Fortunately, communications and education experts have stepped in and the new by-word in effective teaching has become “interactive.” Unlike the passive acquisition of information that we may be used to, interactive learning calls on us to inform educators of our needs, examine our deficiencies, receive an instant evaluation of our educational accomplishments, and provide feedback to our mentors so that they too can benefit from the process. The result is that new information is not only noted; it becomes incorporated into practice. The reason: Buy-in. The question then becomes: why a new journal? Is JNCCN bucking the future by delivering a paperbound, linear, unidirectional teaching tool—attractive and oncologically interesting but still a relic of an outdated approach? We hope not. In each issue...
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Rodger J. Winn

It is easy to measure the loss of Dr. Christopher Desch by recounting his considerable accomplishments: the seminal studies in cancer-related health services research during his early years at the Medical College of Virginia, the clinical research programs he began in the Community Clinical Oncology Program (CCOP) and private practice venues, the leadership position he held in an exemplary oncology practice, the pre-eminent positions he held in ASCO. If I had to point to one achievement that epitomized his career, it would be the rural oncology program he initiated and still staffed, bringing expert oncologic care to all reaches of country-side Virginia. We at NCCN can especially single out the benefits we accrued from Chris's all-too-short tenure as medical director: launching a quality measure program, strengthening the guidelines process, and helping refine JNCCN itself. But, professional accomplishments aside, it is the man we miss and mourn. Chris, the man, brought to each of his endeavors a quality we see too infrequently in today's hard-edged, increasingly corporate world of oncology practice—zeal. And it was zeal committed to one principle, one goal: getting better care for cancer patients. Although his manner was soft-spoken and self-effacing, Chris' passion shone forth. He had an underlying steely determination to raise standards at all levels of care. His probing questions, often astonishing insights, and outside-the-box thinking forced discussions to higher levels. His remarkable people skills allowed him to simultaneously ruffle and smooth feathers, ultimately driving his colleagues to accept his principles and become co-aspirers. Quality of...
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David C. Hohn

advocate of health services research, was deeply concerned about discordant patterns of cancer care in both academic and community cancer centers in the face of compelling evidence from clinical trials. Dr. Winn felt strongly that the best strategy for

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Margaret Tempero

practice guidelines. The diversity part was a bit trickier. Guidelines and quality care beg for evidence-based medicine to guide the process, and health services research to ensure dissemination and assess outcomes. But at the same time, our ability to

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Rodger J. Winn

implemented clinical trials are widely available and are easily accessed. Unfortunately, the slightly darker side of this process comes in the finding of health services researchers that education per se does not necessarily lead to the adoption of new

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Presenter : Robert W. Carlson

practices in implementation and use of clinical practice guidelines, quality improvement, outcomes and health services research, and bioinformatics/information technology sciences. All accepted abstracts are available at JNCCN.org , and this year online