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Peter L. Greenberg, Eyal Attar, John M. Bennett, Clara D. Bloomfield, Carlos M. De Castro, H. Joachim Deeg, James M. Foran, Karin Gaensler, Guillermo Garcia-Manero, Steven D. Gore, David Head, Rami Komrokji, Lori J. Maness, Michael Millenson, Stephen D. Nimer, Margaret R. O'Donnell, Mark A. Schroeder, Paul J. Shami, Richard M. Stone, James E. Thompson and Peter Westervelt

Overview T he myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) represent myeloid clonal hemopathies with relatively heterogeneous spectrums of presentation. The major clinical problems in these disorders are morbidities caused by cytopenias and the potential

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Arjan A. van de Loosdrecht and Theresia M. Westers

implementing FC and propose minimal criteria for the diagnosis and prognostic evaluation of MDS and other cytopenias. 3 , 4 This article summarizes current concepts and guidelines, and introduces recent advances. Initial Screening for MDS With FC Because

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Peter L. Greenberg, Eyal Attar, John M. Bennett, Clara D. Bloomfield, Uma Borate, Carlos M. De Castro, H. Joachim Deeg, Olga Frankfurt, Karin Gaensler, Guillermo Garcia-Manero, Steven D. Gore, David Head, Rami Komrokji, Lori J. Maness, Michael Millenson, Margaret R. O’Donnell, Paul J. Shami, Brady L. Stein, Richard M. Stone, James E. Thompson, Peter Westervelt, Benton Wheeler, Dorothy A. Shead and Maoko Naganuma

myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) represent myeloid clonal hemopathies with relatively heterogeneous spectrums of presentation. The major clinical problems in these disorders are morbidities caused by patients’ cytopenias and the potential for MDS to evolve into

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Peter L. Greenberg, Richard M. Stone, Aref Al-Kali, Stefan K. Barta, Rafael Bejar, John M. Bennett, Hetty Carraway, Carlos M. De Castro, H. Joachim Deeg, Amy E. DeZern, Amir T. Fathi, Olga Frankfurt, Karin Gaensler, Guillermo Garcia-Manero, Elizabeth A. Griffiths, David Head, Ruth Horsfall, Robert A. Johnson, Mark Juckett, Virginia M. Klimek, Rami Komrokji, Lisa A. Kujawski, Lori J. Maness, Margaret R. O'Donnell, Daniel A. Pollyea, Paul J. Shami, Brady L. Stein, Alison R. Walker, Peter Westervelt, Amer Zeidan, Dorothy A. Shead and Courtney Smith

myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) represent myeloid clonal hemopathies with a relatively heterogeneous spectrum of presentation. Major clinical problems associated with these disorders are morbidities caused by cytopenias and the potential for MDS to evolve into

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Mikkael A. Sekeres

, patients with poor-risk cytogenetics (including complex cytogenetics and chromosome 7 abnormalities), excess (≥ 5%) myeloblasts, and multiple cytopenias, or who are dependent on red blood cell transfusions, have higher-risk MDS (patients with excess blasts

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Michael Xiang and Elizabeth A. Kidd

) (aHR, 1.04; P =.78) or genitourinary (cystitis/dysuria) toxicity (aHR, 1.13; P =.48). However, cisplatin was associated with increased hematologic (cytopenia) toxicity (aHR, 2.71; 95% CI, 1.81–4.08; P <.0001), nausea/vomiting (aHR, 2.12; 95% CI, 1

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Reith R. Sarkar, Katherine E. Fero, Daniel M. Seible, Neil Panjwani, Rayna K. Matsuno and James D. Murphy

itself (eg, pancreatitis), and radiation toxicity. Hospitalizations for nonlocal/distant disease included those due to thromboembolic events, cytopenia, dehydration, nausea or vomiting, malnutrition and cachexia, ascites, pathologic fracture, and

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Roswell Park Cancer Institute

The myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) represent myeloid clonal hemopathies with relatively heterogeneous spectrums of presentation. The major clinical problems in these disorders are morbidities caused by patients' cytopenias and the potential for MDS to evolve into acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Managing MDS is complicated by the generally advanced age of the patients (median ages range from 65–70 years), the attendant non-hematologic comorbidities, and older patients' relative inability to tolerate certain intensive forms of therapy. In addition, when the illness progresses into AML, these patients experience lower response rates to standard therapy than patients with de novo AML.

For the most recent version of the guidelines, please visit NCCN.org

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William G. Wierda

The decision of when to start treatment for patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) has not markedly changed; it is triggered by parameters of active disease, such as progressive symptoms or progressive cytopenias related to bone marrow compromise from disease. How to treat patients with CLL has become less complicated, given the growing list of options for CLL, and generally depends on the patient's age, presence of comorbidities, and risk factors (such as chromosome 17 or 11 deletion). During his presentation at the NCCN 20th Annual Conference, Dr. William Wierda focused attention on many of the new kids on the therapeutic block for CLL—the CD20 monoclonal antibodies obinutuzumab and ofatumumab, the BTK inhibitor ibrutinib, the PI3K inhibitor idelalisib, and the BCL-2 inhibitor venetoclax—and reviewed some of the clinical data supporting the use of these agents in different patient populations with CLL.

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The UNMC Eppley Cancer Center at The Nebraska Medical Center

Myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) represent myeloid clonal hemopathies with relatively heterogeneous spectrums of presentation. The major clinical problems in these disorders are morbidities caused by patients' cytopenias and the potential for MDS to evolve into acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Managing MDS is complicated by the generally advanced age of patients, attendant non-hematologic comorbidities, and older patients' relative inability to tolerate some therapies. In addition, when the illness progresses into AML, these patients experience lower response rates to standard therapy than patients with de novo AML. Important changes from the 2008 version of the guidelines include the addition of lenalidomide as a possible treatment for symptomatically anemic non-del(5q) patients whose anemia does not respond to initial therapy.

For the most recent version of the guidelines, please visit NCCN.org