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Susan O'Brien, Ellin Berman, Joseph O. Moore, Javier Pinilla-Ibarz, Jerald P. Radich, Paul J. Shami, B. Douglas Smith, David S. Snyder, Hema M. Sundar, Moshe Talpaz and Meir Wetzler

years, and eventually leads to terminal blast-phase disease, with death occurring from bleeding and infectious complications. 3 First-Line Treatment: Imatinib Versus Second-Generation Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitors Imatinib Imatinib is a selective inhibitor

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Jerald P. Radich

-ABL kinase domain mutation analysis is recommended if patients in chronic phase have an inadequate initial response or disease progresses to accelerated or blast phase. According to Dr. Radich, there are now more than 200 point mutations, which may account

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Susan O’Brien, Jerald P. Radich, Camille N. Abboud, Mojtaba Akhtari, Jessica K. Altman, Ellin Berman, Peter Curtin, Daniel J. DeAngelo, Michael Deininger, Steven Devine, Amir T. Fathi, Jason Gotlib, Madan Jagasia, Patricia Kropf, Joseph O. Moore, Arnel Pallera, Vishnu VB. Reddy, Neil P. Shah, B. Douglas Smith, David S. Snyder, Meir Wetzler, Kristina Gregory and Hema Sundar

patients with CML. 4 CML occurs in 3 different phases (chronic, accelerated, and blast phase) and is usually diagnosed in the chronic phase. Untreated chronic phase CML (CP-CML) will eventually progress to advanced phase in 3 to 5 years. 5 Gene

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Michael W. Deininger, Neil P. Shah, Jessica K. Altman, Ellin Berman, Ravi Bhatia, Bhavana Bhatnagar, Daniel J. DeAngelo, Jason Gotlib, Gabriela Hobbs, Lori Maness, Monica Mead, Leland Metheny, Sanjay Mohan, Joseph O. Moore, Kiran Naqvi, Vivian Oehler, Arnel M. Pallera, Mrinal Patnaik, Keith Pratz, Iskra Pusic, Michal G. Rose, B. Douglas Smith, David S. Snyder, Kendra L. Sweet, Moshe Talpaz, James Thompson, David T. Yang, Kristina M. Gregory and Hema Sundar

-ABL1 Transcript Variants in CML” (page 1388). CML occurs in 3 different phases (chronic, accelerated, and blast phase) and is usually diagnosed in the chronic phase in the developed world. Untreated chronic phase CML (CP-CML) will eventually progress to

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Jerald P. Radich, Michael Deininger, Camille N. Abboud, Jessica K. Altman, Ellin Berman, Ravi Bhatia, Bhavana Bhatnagar, Peter Curtin, Daniel J. DeAngelo, Jason Gotlib, Gabriela Hobbs, Madan Jagasia, Hagop M. Kantarjian, Lori Maness, Leland Metheny, Joseph O. Moore, Arnel Pallera, Philip Pancari, Mrinal Patnaik, Enkhtsetseg Purev, Michal G. Rose, Neil P. Shah, B. Douglas Smith, David S. Snyder, Kendra L. Sweet, Moshe Talpaz, James Thompson, David T. Yang, Kristina M. Gregory and Hema Sundar

setting of Ph-positive acute lymphoblastic leukemia. p190 is detected only in 1% of patients with CML. 3 CML occurs in 3 different phases (chronic, accelerated, and blast phases) and is usually diagnosed in the chronic phase. Untreated chronic phase CML

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Wei Wang, Guilin Tang, Tapan Kadia, Xinyan Lu, Yan Li, Lanshan Huang, Ximena Montenegro-Garreaud, Roberto N. Miranda and Sa A. Wang

progression to accelerated or blast phase. 3 To determine whether the association between clonal cytogenetic evolution and disease progression was also evident in other similar cases, we reviewed the literature for cases with t(8;22)(p11.2;q11.2). Cases with

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Chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) accounts for 15% of adult leukemias. In 2005, an estimated 4,600 cases will be diagnosed, and 850 patients will die of the disease. The median age of disease onset is 53 years; however, CML occurs in all age groups, with an increasing proportion of younger patients in more recent series. ML progresses from a chronic phase to a rapidly fatal blastic phase, generally over 3 to 5 years. The blast phase is often preceded by a transition period, called the accelerated phase, which is marked by the acquisition of new cytogenetic abnormalities in 50% to 80% of patients. Several definitions of the accelerated phase of the disease are summarized.

For the most recent version of the guidelines, please visit NCCN.org

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Chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) accounts for 15% of adult leukemias. In 2003, an estimated 4,300 cases will be diagnosed, and 1,700 patients will die from the disease. The median age of patients with the disease is 53, but CML occurs in all age groups, with an increasing proportion of younger patients in more recent studies. CML progresses from a chronic phase to a rapidly fatal blastic phase, generally over 3 to 5 years. The blast phase is often preceded by a transition period, called the accelerated phase, which is marked by the acquisition of new cytogenetic abnormalities in 50% to 80% of patients.

For the most recent version of the guidelines, please visit NCCN.org

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Vijaya Raj Bhatt, Mojtaba Akhtari, R. Gregory Bociek, Jennifer N. Sanmann, Ji Yuan, Bhavana J. Dave, Warren G. Sanger, Anne Kessinger and James O. Armitage

+ -AML Identify the evidence supporting clinicopathologic distinction between Ph + -AML and chronic blast phase CML Discuss the role of SCT in the treatment of Ph + -AML Philadelphia chromosome-positive acute myeloid leukemia (Ph

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Aaron T. Gerds, Jason Gotlib, Prithviraj Bose, Michael W. Deininger, Andrew Dunbar, Amro Elshoury, Tracy I. George, Ivana Gojo, Krishna Gundabolu, Elizabeth Hexner, Gabriela Hobbs, Tania Jain, Catriona Jamieson, Andrew T. Kuykendall, Brandon McMahon, Sanjay R. Mohan, Vivian Oehler, Stephen Oh, Animesh Pardanani, Nikolai Podoltsev, Erik Ranheim, Lindsay Rein, Rachel Salit, David S. Snyder, Brady L. Stein, Moshe Talpaz, Swapna Thota, Pankit Vachhani, Martha Wadleigh, Katherine Walsh, Dawn C. Ward, Mary Anne Bergman and Hema Sundar

, interstitial CD25+ spindle-shaped mast cells may be seen, whereas KIT D816V mutation and dense clusters of mast cells typically seen in systemic mastocytosis (SM) are absent. 16 CEL is the most common clinical presentation. Blast phase MPN, acute myeloid