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Joanne E. Mortimer, Andrea M. Barsevick, Charles L. Bennett, Ann M. Berger, Charles Cleeland, Shannon R. DeVader, Carmen Escalante, Jeffrey Gilreath, Arti Hurria, Tito R. Mendoza and Hope S. Rugo

T he NCCN Cancer-Related Fatigue (CRF) Scientific Research Committee was convened in September 2009 to accomplish 3 objectives: 1) review the current methods to measure and interventions to treat CRF; 2) recommend a CRF measure or develop a new

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Ann M. Berger, Kathi Mooney, Amy Alvarez-Perez, William S. Breitbart, Kristen M. Carpenter, David Cella, Charles Cleeland, Efrat Dotan, Mario A. Eisenberger, Carmen P. Escalante, Paul B. Jacobsen, Catherine Jankowski, Thomas LeBlanc, Jennifer A. Ligibel, Elizabeth Trice Loggers, Belinda Mandrell, Barbara A. Murphy, Oxana Palesh, William F. Pirl, Steven C. Plaxe, Michelle B. Riba, Hope S. Rugo, Carolina Salvador, Lynne I. Wagner, Nina D. Wagner-Johnston, Finly J. Zachariah, Mary Anne Bergman and Courtney Smith

Fatigue is a common symptom in patients with cancer. It is nearly universal in those receiving cytotoxic chemotherapy, radiation therapy, bone marrow transplantation, or treatment with biologic response modifiers. 1 – 3 According to a survey of 1569

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Margaret L. McNeely and Kerry S. Courneya

O ver the past decade, a significant increase has occurred in the amount and quality of research examining the role of exercise in managing cancer-related fatigue (CRF). 1 – 5 In fact, a recent systematic review noted that CRF is the most

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Tami Borneman, Barbara F. Piper, Virginia Chih-Yi Sun, Marianna Koczywas, Gwen Uman and Betty Ferrell

-Related Fatigue Clinical Practice Guidelines, version 3 . 2007 . Available at : www.nccn.org/professionals/physician_gls/PDF/fatigue.pdf . Accessed December 5, 2006 . 2. NIH State-of-the-Science Statement on symptom management in cancer: pain

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Paul G. Richardson, Jacob P. Laubach, Robert L. Schlossman, Constantine Mitsiades and Kenneth Anderson

Peripheral neuropathy (PN) and asthenia (fatigue) are among the most commonly seen complications in patients undergoing multiple myeloma (MM) therapy. These potentially debilitating adverse effects are frequently dose limiting, and they may

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William Breitbart and Yesne Alici

S everal pharmacologic agents have been considered and studied for the treatment of cancer-related fatigue, including psychostimulants, antidepressants, megestrol acetate, and amantadine. 1 A recent meta-analysis of pharmacologic treatment

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Ann M. Berger, Amy Pickar Abernethy, Ashley Atkinson, Andrea M. Barsevick, William S. Breitbart, David Cella, Bernadine Cimprich, Charles Cleeland, Mario A. Eisenberger, Carmen P. Escalante, Paul B. Jacobsen, Phyllis Kaldor, Jennifer A. Ligibel, Barbara A. Murphy, Tracey O'Connor, William F. Pirl, Eve Rodler, Hope S. Rugo, Jay Thomas and Lynne I. Wagner

Overview Fatigue is a common symptom in patients with cancer and is nearly universal in those undergoing cytotoxic chemotherapy, radiation therapy, bone marrow transplantation, or treatment with biologic response modifiers. 1 – 10 The symptom

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Crystal S. Denlinger, Jennifer A. Ligibel, Madhuri Are, K. Scott Baker, Wendy Demark-Wahnefried, Debra L. Friedman, Mindy Goldman, Lee Jones, Allison King, Grace H. Ku, Elizabeth Kvale, Terry S. Langbaum, Kristin Leonardi-Warren, Mary S. McCabe, Michelle Melisko, Jose G. Montoya, Kathi Mooney, Mary Ann Morgan, Javid J. Moslehi, Tracey O’Connor, Linda Overholser, Electra D. Paskett, Muhammad Raza, Karen L. Syrjala, Susan G. Urba, Mark T. Wakabayashi, Phyllis Zee, Nicole McMillian and Deborah Freedman-Cass

-related fatigue as “a distressing, persistent, subjective sense of physical, emotional, and/or cognitive tiredness or exhaustion related to cancer or cancer treatment that is not proportional to recent activity and interferes with usual functioning.” 1 Fatigue is

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Sriram Yennurajalingam, Nizar M. Tannir, Janet L. Williams, Zhanni Lu, Kenneth R. Hess, Susan Frisbee-Hume, Helen L. House, Zita Dubauskas Lim, Kyu-Hyoung Lim, Gabriel Lopez, Akhila Reddy, Ahsan Azhar, Angelique Wong, Sunil M. Patel, Deborah A. Kuban, Ahmed Omar Kaseb, Lorenzo Cohen and Eduardo Bruera

Background Cancer-related fatigue (CRF) is the most common symptom in patients with cancer. 1 , 2 Despite the high frequency, severity, and effects of CRF on quality of life (QoL), limited treatment options are available. 1 , 3 Prior

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Barbara F. Piper and David Cella

I ncreasing attention is being given to exploring whether fatigue in patients with cancer experiencing similar symptoms can be classified or grouped into specific clinically significant subtypes. Various methods have been used to classify these