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Emil Lou, Donna D'Souza and Andrew C. Nelson

mutations do not benefit from treatment with epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) inhibitors. 4 During this time, there have been investigations examining whether this is broadly and universally true across all forms of KRAS mutations, or whether any

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Barbara Burtness, Milan Anadkat, Surendra Basti, Miranda Hughes, Mario E. Lacouture, Joan S. McClure, Patricia L. Myskowski, Jennifer Paul, Clifford S. Perlis, Leonard Saltz and Sharon Spencer

with anti-epidermal growth factor receptor therapy: survey results . Oncology 2007 ; 72 : 152 – 159 . 28 Wagner LI Lacouture ME . Dermatologic toxicities associated with EGFR inhibitors: the clinical psychologist’s perspective. Impact on

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Barbara Burtness

assortment of adverse skin effects are associated with the use of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) inhibitors such as cetuximab and erlotinib. Although papulopustular rash may be the most commonly observed side effect of these targeted agents, non

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Presenter : Dustin A. Deming

. Historically, targeting BRAF became an exciting concept based on successes seen in melanoma. Although response rates to single-agent BRAF inhibitors in CRC are low, results of BRAF in combination with MEK or EGFR inhibitors have been more encouraging. “Not

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Amy Zhou, Manik Amin, Kathryn J. Fowler, Elizabeth M. Brunt, Jesse Keller and Benjamin Tan

combination of an epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) inhibitor and a vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) inhibitor. Case Presentation During a workup for chest pain in a 77-year-old Caucasian woman, a 3-cm liver lesion was found incidentally

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Kristin K. Deeb, Jakub P. Sram, Hanlin Gao and Marwan G. Fakih

constantly increasing number of molecular mutations. NGS provided sensitivity superior to Sanger sequencing and pyrosequencing in detecting EGFR and KRAS mutations in lung cancer specimens and clinical response to EGFR inhibitor. 42 Challenges remain for

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Paul F. Engstrom

I am pleased to work with the editor-in-chief of JNCCN, Hal Burstein, MD, PhD, in organizing this issue of the journal dedicated to colon and rectum cancer management, and I appreciate the opportunity to note some of the updates to the field in the past year. In 2009, the NCCN Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology were expanded to include a survivorship component. Long-term follow-up care of colorectal cancer survivors should include management of late complications and encouraging patients to modify their lifestyle through improved exercise and diet. Another major change in the guidelines represented the determination of tumor KRAS gene status before starting treatment with an epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) inhibitor, such as cetuximab or panitumumab. Data included in the guidelines show that patients whose tumor expresses KRAS mutation have little or no likelihood of responding to the EGFR inhibitors. The edition of the guidelines published in this issue also emphasizes the use of systemic combination chemotherapy such as FOLFOX or FOLFIRI with or without bevacizumab in the attempt to reduce the size of colorectal metastasis as well as the primary tumor and to allow patients with initially unresectable disease to be candidates for resection. These changes in the guidelines are reflected and expanded in the authored manuscripts. For example, Denlinger and Barsevick review the literature on colorectal cancer survivorship. They note clear evidence that quality of life is diminished when treatment-related symptoms, such as fatigue, distress, and sleep difficulties) plague colorectal cancer survivors. The long-term effects of treatment,...
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Tanios Bekaii-Saab

-positive mCRC. Despite these preliminary findings, there was very little uptake for incorporating an all- RAS mutational analysis before using EGFR inhibitors in mCRC. Why the initial reluctance? In addition to the lack of available standardized testing to

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Mario E. Lacouture

made several key points about skin rash produced by different cancer therapies: Most patients taking EGFR inhibitors develop an acneiform rash on the face, scalp, and upper body, often within the first 4 weeks. This is associated with pruritus

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by the ORP. This feature highlights an NCCN study funded through the grant mechanism. A Phase II Study of Osimertinib in Combination With Selumetinib in EGFR Inhibitor–Naïve Advanced EGFR -Mutant Lung Cancer Principal Investigator: Pasi Janne, MD