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Alex J. Mitchell

P erhaps the most important development in psychooncology in the past 10 years has been the development and testing of short, user-friendly screening tools for distress. Attempts to validate these tools have helped crystallize the concept of

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Jimmie C. Holland, Barbara Andersen, William S. Breitbart, Luke O. Buchmann, Bruce Compas, Teresa L. Deshields, Moreen M. Dudley, Stewart Fleishman, Caryl D. Fulcher, Donna B. Greenberg, Carl B. Greiner, George F. Handzo, Laura Hoofring, Charles Hoover, Paul B. Jacobsen, Elizabeth Kvale, Michael H. Levy, Matthew J. Loscalzo, Randi McAllister-Black, Karen Y. Mechanic, Oxana Palesh, Janice P. Pazar, Michelle B. Riba, Kristin Roper, Alan D. Valentine, Lynne I. Wagner, Michael A. Zevon, Nicole R. McMillian and Deborah A. Freedman-Cass

United States, an estimated 1,638,910 new cancer cases and 577,190 deaths from cancer will occur in 2012. 1 All patients experience some level of distress associated with the diagnosis of cancer and its effects and treatment regardless of the stage of

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Jimmie C. Holland, Barbara Andersen, William S. Breitbart, Bruce Compas, Moreen M. Dudley, Stewart Fleishman, Caryl D. Fulcher, Donna B. Greenberg, Carl B. Greiner, George F. Handzo, Laura Hoofring, Paul B. Jacobsen, Sara J. Knight, Kate Learson, Michael H. Levy, Matthew J. Loscalzo, Sharon Manne, Randi McAllister-Black, Michelle B. Riba, Kristin Roper, Alan D. Valentine, Lynne I. Wagner and Michael A. Zevon

Distress Management Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology NCCN Categories of Evidence and Consensus Category 1: The recommendation is based on high-level evidence (e.g., randomized controlled trials) and there is uniform NCCN consensus

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Natalie Riblet, Karen Skalla, Auden McClure, Karen Homa, Alison Luciano and Thomas H. Davis

Symptoms of psychological distress, such as depression and anxiety, are common with any cancer but are particularly prevalent with head and neck cancers (HNCs), affecting as many as 35% of patients. 1 , 2 Several factors likely contribute to risk

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Caitlin R. Meeker, Yu-Ning Wong, Brian L. Egleston, Michael J. Hall, Elizabeth R. Plimack, Lainie P. Martin, Margaret von Mehren, Bianca R. Lewis and Daniel M. Geynisman

the millions of beneficiaries without supplemental insurance are at increased risk for financial distress as a result of a cancer diagnosis. 5 The American Cancer Society reports that 53% of the 15.5 million cancer survivors are aged ≤69 years, 6

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Kristine A. Donovan, Teresa L. Deshields, Cheyenne Corbett and Michelle B. Riba

NCCN was among the first voices calling for routine screening of distress in patients with cancer. The first NCCN Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology (NCCN Guidelines) for Distress Management were published in 1999. 1 Since then, a number of

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Elisabeth Kenne Sarenmalm, Salmir Nasic, Cecilia Håkanson, Joakim Öhlén, Eva Carlsson, Monica E. Pettersson and Richard Sawatzky

There is increasing recognition that psychosocial care, with its goal of relieving emotional distress and promoting well-being, is an essential component of the comprehensive care of patients diagnosed with cancer. Heightened distress is common 1

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Jesse D. Troy, Carlos M. de Castro, Mary Ruth Pupa, Greg P. Samsa, Amy P. Abernethy and Thomas W. LeBlanc

are referred to as “distress.” 2 Approximately one-third of patients with cancer experience distress. 3 Distress may affect successful management of cancer through negatively impacting patients' adherence to therapy and decision-making capacity, and

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Gabrielle B. Rocque, Richard A. Taylor, Aras Acemgil, Xuelin Li, Maria Pisu, Kelly Kenzik, Bradford E. Jackson, Karina I. Halilova, Wendy Demark-Wahnefried, Karen Meneses, Yufeng Li, Michelle Y. Martin, Carol Chambless, Nedra Lisovicz, Mona Fouad, Edward E. Partridge, Elizabeth A. Kvale and the Patient Care Connect Group

Background Since the inception of the Distress Thermometer in 1998, 1 the tool has been refined and used in multiple cancer populations to identify patients with distress and to characterize causes of distress. 2 – 9 NCCN recommends use of

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Mark Lazenby

Guidelines) for Distress Management, 2 which call for routine distress screening of patients with cancer, are no exception. Screening for distress attempts to identify in real time the concerns of patients, so that those concerns can be addressed in a timely