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Mario E. Lacouture

Oncology providers should take an early, proactive approach in managing dermatologic toxicities associated with cancer treatment, Mario E. Lacouture, MD, emphasized at the NCCN 20th Annual Conference. These toxicities—which affect the skin, hair

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Barbara Burtness

. In closing, prophylactic treatment of dermatologic toxicity associated with targeted therapy may be helpful in delaying the development of grade 2 or higher skin rash. However, Dr. Burtness explained that patients would respond to these same agents if

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Gary R. Hudes, Michael A. Carducci, Toni K. Choueiri, Peg Esper, Eric Jonasch, Rashmi Kumar, Kim A. Margolin, M. Dror Michaelson, Robert J. Motzer, Roberto Pili, Susan Roethke, and Sandy Srinivas

ribosomal protein S6 kinase have been implicated as possible causes of cardiac failure, with hypertension and hypothyroidism as contributing factors. 117 Dermatologic Toxicities: Dermatologic toxicities occur commonly with sorafenib and sunitinib but are

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Barbara Burtness, Milan Anadkat, Surendra Basti, Miranda Hughes, Mario E. Lacouture, Joan S. McClure, Patricia L. Myskowski, Jennifer Paul, Clifford S. Perlis, Leonard Saltz, and Sharon Spencer

with anti-epidermal growth factor receptor therapy: survey results . Oncology 2007 ; 72 : 152 – 159 . 28 Wagner LI Lacouture ME . Dermatologic toxicities associated with EGFR inhibitors: the clinical psychologist’s perspective. Impact on

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Emily H. Castellanos, Sheau-chiann Chen, Hillary Drexler, and Leora Horn

had a stronger negative impact on patient willingness to undergo treatment, compared with dermatologic toxicity ( P <.0001; OR for gastrointestinal vs dermatologic, 0.58; 95% CI, 0.53–0.68; OR for constitutional vs dermatologic, 0.86; 95% CI, 0

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John A. Thompson

Toxicity Maculopapular rash, which can be severe, is one of the more common toxicities seen with ICI therapy. Other dermatologic toxicities can include pruritus, bullous dermatoses, vasculitis, and vitiligo. Management of dermatologic and other AEs is

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Optimal Treatment of Unresectable Nonmelanoma Skin Cancers Targeted Agents: Management of Dermatologic Toxicities Supporters: Breast Cancer Supported by educational grants from AstraZeneca; Eisai Inc.; Genentech; and Novartis Oncology

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John A. Thompson

a 37% reduction in risk of death ( P =.023) with dabrafenib plus trametinib compared with dabrafenib alone in patients with unresectable stage IIIC or IV, BRAF V600E/K mutant melanoma. 10 Dermatologic toxicities are also reduced with the

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Shailender Bhatia and John A. Thompson

, severe IrAEs (grade 3 or 4) were seen in only 15% of patients and included diarrhea/colitis (8%), endocrinopathy (2%), dermatologic toxicity (< 2%), and hepatic toxicity (< 1%). Most IrAEs had resolved by 6 to 8 weeks with appropriate immunosuppressive

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John A. Thompson, Bryan J. Schneider, Julie Brahmer, Stephanie Andrews, Philippe Armand, Shailender Bhatia, Lihua E. Budde, Luciano Costa, Marianne Davies, David Dunnington, Marc S. Ernstoff, Matthew Frigault, Brianna Hoffner, Christopher J. Hoimes, Mario Lacouture, Frederick Locke, Matthew Lunning, Nisha A. Mohindra, Jarushka Naidoo, Anthony J. Olszanski, Olalekan Oluwole, Sandip P. Patel, Sunil Reddy, Mabel Ryder, Bianca Santomasso, Scott Shofer, Jeffrey A. Sosman, Momen Wahidi, Yinghong Wang, Alyse Johnson-Chilla, and Jillian L. Scavone

ipilimumab monotherapy. 1 , 50 , 51 , 130 – 132 Dermatologic Toxicity Dermatologic toxicities are the most prevalent irAEs associated with ICI therapy. Inflammatory skin conditions typically present within the first 2 cycles of treatment (ie, within several