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Cindy Railton, Sasha Lupichuk, Jennifer McCormick, Lihong Zhong, Jenny Jaeeun Ko, Barbara Walley, Anil A. Joy and Janine Giese-Davis

-to-recurrence diagnosis, patient satisfaction, and quality of life (QOL) for PCP follow-up. 13 – 17 Although surveillance mammography and antiestrogen treatment adherence improve survival, 18 – 29 published reports of adherence levels in PCP care are rare. Likewise

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Stefanie L. Thorsness, Azael Freites-Martinez, Michael A. Marchetti, Cristian Navarrete-Dechent, Mario E. Lacouture and Emily S. Tonorezos

In this retrospective review of 946 adult survivors of childhood and young adult cancer, 76 patients were found to have 318 NMSCs, both inside and outside the field of prior RT. Notably, in this cohort of patients under close medical surveillance

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Betsy Rolland and Jordan Eschler

components of survivorship care are also used in Table 1 3 : Surveillance for new or recurrent cancer (ongoing screening) Prevention of new or recurrent cancer (nutrition, smoking cessation, tanning/sunscreen use, exercise, genetic screening

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Paul F. Engstrom, Juan Pablo Arnoletti, Al B. Benson III, Yi-Jen Chen, Michael A. Choti, Harry S. Cooper, Anne Covey, Raza A. Dilawari, Dayna S. Early, Peter C. Enzinger, Marwan G. Fakih, James Fleshman Jr., Charles Fuchs, Jean L. Grem, Krystyna Kiel, James A. Knol, Lucille A. Leong, Edward Lin, Mary F. Mulcahy, Sujata Rao, David P. Ryan, Leonard Saltz, David Shibata, John M. Skibber, Constantinos Sofocleous, James Thomas, Alan P. Venook and Christopher Willett

. 231 Rodriguez-Moranta F Salo J Arcusa A . Postoperative surveillance in patients with colorectal cancer who have undergone curative resection: a prospective, multicenter, randomized, controlled trial . J Clin Oncol 2006 ; 24 : 386 – 393

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Nalan Nese, Ruta Gupta, Matthew H. T. Bui and Mahul B. Amin

Edited by Kerrin G. Robinson

cancer biomarkers: current developments and future implementation . Curr Opin Urol 2007 ; 17 : 341 – 346 . 43 Yoder BJ Skacel M Hedgepeth R . Reflex UroVysion testing of bladder cancer surveillance patients with equivocal or negative urine

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This article summarizes the NCCN clinical practice guidelines for managing esophageal cancer. The guidelines begin with the clinical presentation of the patient to the primary care physician or gastroenterologist and address diagnosis, pathologic staging, surgical management, adjuvant treatment, management of recurrent and metastatic disease, and patient surveillance.

For the most recent version of the guidelines, please visit NCCN.org

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This article summarizes the NCCN clinical practice guidelines for managing rectal cancer. The guidelines begin with the clinical presentation of the patient to the primary care physician or gastroenterologist and address diagnosis, pathologic staging, surgical management, adjuvant treatment, management of recurrent and metastatic disease, and patient surveillance.

For the most recent version of the guidelines, please visit NCCN.org

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Patrick M. Lynch

Individuals with a family history of colorectal cancer or colorectal adenomas have an increased risk for colorectal cancer. When no hereditary syndrome is evident, screening is based on empiric risk estimates. The risk is greatest for individuals with specific inherited cancer-predisposing disorders. When conditions such as familial adenomatous polyposis or hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer are diagnosed, specific neoplasm risk estimates can usually be performed based on advances in molecular genetics. These estimates lead to more straightforward and cost-effective approaches to surveillance and management. The National Comprehensive Cancer Center Network (NCCN) and other groups have provided detailed guidelines for evaluating patients based on recognition of clinical syndrome characteristics, followed by appropriate genetic counseling, genetic testing, and optimal surveillance. The NCCN guidelines are used as a frame of reference for this discussion of selected recent advances in human cancer genetics as they apply to clinical practice.

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Kwang-Yu Chang, Jang-Yang Chang, Joseph Chao and Yun Yen

Esophageal cancer is the eighth most common cancer worldwide, and one of the most fatal diseases despite modern medical treatment. Because correct staging and surveillance of neoadjuvant therapy for esophageal cancer is mandatory for further treatment planning, choosing a modern imaging system is important. The development of 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (18F-FDG-PET) has provided alternate means of tumor detection distinct from more conventional methods. This modality has extraordinary performance in detecting locoregional lymph node involvement and distant metastatic disease, and has been introduced as a powerful tool in many guidelines. However, some factors still lead to false-negative or -positive results, raising questions of its accuracy. This article discusses the clinical efficacy of PET in staging and surveillance of neoadjuvant therapy in esophageal cancer, comparing its accuracy with conventional imaging modalities.

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An estimated 3,900 new cases of anal canal cancer will occur in 2002, accounting for approximately 1.6% of digestive system cancers in the United States. NCCN clinical practice guidelines for managing anal cancer discuss the complete management of this disease, from clinical presentation through diagnosis, pathologic staging, surgical management, adjuvant treatment, management of recurrent and metastatic disease, and patient surveillance.

For the most recent version of the guidelines, please visit NCCN.org