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Chest Radiography in the Initial Evaluation of Adult Patients With Febrile Neutropenia Patients Undergoing HSCT Yolin-Raley Deborah S. a PA-C Dagogo-Jack Ibiayi b MD Niell Heidi B. a PA-C Soiffer Robert J. a MD Antin Joseph H

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Harold J. Burstein

. No white cell–stimulating factors for primary prevention of febrile neutropenia for patients with less than 20% risk for this complication. If the ancient adage, “First, do no harm” is still sacred, then the next line would be “Second, do no

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Support Tool on Colony-Stimulating Factor Use and Chemotherapy-Induced Febrile Neutropenia Among Patients With Breast Cancer Agiro Abiy a PhD DeVries Andrea a PhD Malin Jennifer b MD, PhD Fisch Michael J. c MD, MPH 2 2018 16

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: Immunotherapy for Colorectal Carcinoma Oh David Y. MD, PhD Venook Alan P. MD Fong Lawrence MD 8 2015 13 13 8 8 970 970 978 978 0130970 10.6004/jnccn.2015.0117 Importance of Risk Factors for Febrile Neutropenia Among Patients Receiving

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.6004/jnccn.2018.7053 A Study of Novel Febrile Neutropenia Risk Factors Related to Bone Marrow or Immune Suppression, Barrier Function, and Bacterial Flora Family Leila a PhD Li Yanli b PhD Chen Lie Hong c DPH Page John H. d MD, ScD

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Marc Fishman, William Shimp, James Krook, Akhil Kumar and William J.M. Hrushesky

alternative choices but rather avoiding use of the drug with chemotherapy regimens with a low risk of febrile neutropenia. 2 , 3 We agree with Dr. Burstein that a serious dialogue on cost-effective care is needed. Talk, however, is clearly not enough. We

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cytopenia(s),” “or increased marrow blasts” was added. Following “Clinically relevant thrombocytopenia or neutropenia,” “or increased marrow blasts” was added. “No response” was changed to “Disease progression/no response.” Footnote “bb” was added

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Kenneth C. Anderson, Melissa Alsina, Djordje Atanackovic, J. Sybil Biermann, Jason C. Chandler, Caitlin Costello, Benjamin Djulbegovic, Henry C. Fung, Cristina Gasparetto, Kelly Godby, Craig Hofmeister, Leona Holmberg, Sarah Holstein, Carol Ann Huff, Adetola Kassim, Amrita Y. Krishnan, Shaji K. Kumar, Michaela Liedtke, Matthew Lunning, Noopur Raje, Frederic J. Reu, Seema Singhal, George Somlo, Keith Stockerl-Goldstein, Steven P. Treon, Donna Weber, Joachim Yahalom, Dorothy A. Shead and Rashmi Kumar

to toxicity, 6 patients experienced nonhematologic grade 3/4 adverse events (20%), including muscle weakness, sepsis, and pneumonia; neutropenia and thrombocytopenia were seen in 2 patients (10%). 14 Based on data from the 3 phase II studies, 8 , 10

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Jason D. Goldman, Amelia Gallaher, Rupali Jain, Zach Stednick, Manoj Menon, Michael J. Boeckh, Paul S. Pottinger, Stephen M. Schwartz and Corey Casper

cell transplantation (HSCT). These ambulatory patients are highly immunosuppressed, including deep and prolonged neutropenia, and often require intensive therapies, such as daily infusions or transfusion support. 11 Adults requiring hospitalization are

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Erin Reid, Gita Suneja, Richard F. Ambinder, Kevin Ard, Robert Baiocchi, Stefan K. Barta, Evie Carchman, Adam Cohen, Oxana V. Crysler, Neel Gupta, Chelsea Gustafson, Allison Hall, Kimberly L. Johung, Ann Klopp, Ann S. LaCasce, Chi Lin, Amitkumar Mehta, Manoj P. Menon, David Morgan, Nitya Nathwani, Ariela Noy, Lee Ratner, Stacey Rizza, Michelle A. Rudek, Julian Sanchez, Jeff Taylor, Benjamin Tomlinson, Chia-Ching J. Wang, Sai Yendamuri, Mary A. Dwyer, CGC and Deborah A. Freedman-Cass

malignancies). 39 – 43 In particular, chemotherapy can cause neutropenia, which is a major risk factor for the development of infections. 44 Newer targeted agents are also associated with immunosuppression and increased infection risk. 45 The frequency and