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Alexandra Hunt, Elizabeth Handorf, Vipin Khare, Matthew Blau, Yana Chertock, Carolyn Fang, Michael J. Hall and Rishi Jain

evaluate the frequency of specific stressors including: practical (e.g. insurance/financial), family (e.g. family health issues), emotional (e.g. nervousness), or physical (e.g. fatigue). Adverse events on trial including hospitalizations, toxicities, or

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6 6 4 4 Evidenced-Based Report on the Occurrence of Fatigue in Long-Term Cancer Survivors Braun Ilana M. MD Greenberg Donna B. MD Pirl William F. MD 04 2008 6 6 4 4 347 347 354 354 0060347 10.6004/jnccn.2008.0029 Non

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0060447 10.6004/jnccn.2008.0035 Fatigue is the Most Important Symptom for Advanced Cancer Patients Who Have Had Chemotherapy Butt Zeeshan PhD Rosenbloom Sarah K. PhD Abernethy Amy P. MD Beaumont Jennifer L. MS Paul Diane MS

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Karen Wonders, Rob Wise and Danielle Ondreka

strength, quality of life, depression, fear fatigue, and pain all improved following the exercise intervention. Conclusion: Exercise is an effective means to manage treatment-related symptoms in cancer and should be a part of the standard of care.

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Murali Sundaram, Kathleen L. Deering, Dolly Sharma, Qing Harshaw, Jeremiah Trudeau and Jacqueline C. Barrientos

. Respondents completed demographic/clinical information and surveys via phone (Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-General [FACT-G], FACT-Leukemia, and Functional Assessment of Chronic Illness Therapy [FACIT]-Fatigue and Cancer Therapy Satisfaction

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6 6 1 1 Celebrating the New Callan Kimberly MS, ELS 01 2008 6 6 1 1 1 1 1 1 0060001 10.6004/jnccn.2008.0001 Modifying Cancer-Related Fatigue by Optimizing Sleep Quality Berger Ann Malone PhD, RN, AOCN Mitchell Sandra A. CRNP

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Karen Hock and Cari Utendorf

fibrosis and fatigue. Results: The data will demonstrate an increase in percentage of pre-operative assessments since the implementation of this program in January 2018. In addition, the data will demonstrate the increased opportunity to treat subclinical

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Chao-Hui Sylvia Huang, Jennifer K. Anderson, Jasmine A. Boykin, Jasmine K. Vickers, Heather Forbes, Kellie L. Flood, Lisle M. Nabell and Kelly N. Godby

strategies to manage anxiety or depression. Barriers to receive counseling services include physical symptom burden such as pain and fatigue, medical procedures, and inadequate psychosocial care staffing. Findings revealed high perceived needs and patient

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Sonali Agrawal, Caitlin R. Meeker, Sandeep Aggarwal, Elizabeth A. Handorf, Sunil Adige, Efrat Dotan, Crystal S. Denlinger, William H. Ward, Jeffrey M. Farma and Namrata Vijayvergia

(others were on clinical trials with novel agents). Most common grade 3+ tox reported by providers included nausea (10%) and neuropathy (8%), while the common clinically significant tox reported by pts were neuropathy (20%), fatigue (20%), and anxiety (15

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Brian Seal, Candice Yong, M. Janelle Cambron-Mellott, Oliver Will, Martine C. Maculaitis, Kelly Clapp, Emily Mulvihill, Ion Cotarla and Ranee Mehra

%, and all G neuropathy from 5% to 39%, if OS increased by 17, 4, and 2 months, respectively. In addition, pts would require an increase in OS of 1 month to accept an increase in G3/4 fatigue from 1% to 12% or all G pneumonitis from <1% to 8%. Preferences