Search Results

You are looking at 71 - 80 of 358 items for :

  • "Cancer survivor" x
Clear All
Full access

St. Jude Children's Research Hospital

Fatigue is a common symptom in patients with cancer and is nearly universal in those undergoing cytotoxic chemotherapy, radiation therapy, bone marrow transplantation, or treatment with biologic response modifiers. The problem, which affects 70% to 100% of cancer patients, has been exacerbated by the increased use of fatigue-inducing multimodal treatments and dose-dense, dose-intense protocols. In patients with metastatic disease, the prevalence of cancer-related fatigue exceeds 75%, and cancer survivors report that fatigue is a disruptive symptom months or even years after treatment ends. Patients perceive fatigue to be the most distressing symptom associated with cancer and its treatment, more distressing even than pain or nausea and vomiting, which, for most patients, can generally be managed with medications.

For the most recent version of the guidelines, please visit NCCN.org

Full access

The problem of cancer-related fatigue, which affects 70% to 100% of cancer patients, has been exacerbated by the increased use of fatigue-inducing multimodal treatments and dose-dense, dose-intense protocols. In patients with metastatic disease, the prevalence of cancer-related fatigue exceeds 75%, and cancer survivors report that fatigue is a disruptive symptom months or even years after treatment ends. To address the significant problem of cancer-related fatigue, the NCCN convened a panel of experts in the field of fatigue. The Cancer-Related Fatigue Clinical Practice Guidelines synthesize the available research and clinical experience in this field and provide recommendations for patient care.

For the most recent version of the guidelines, please visit NCCN.org

Full access

Harold J. Burstein

If you read articles about hereditary cancer syndromes, biological markers that predict risk and benefit from targeted therapies, optimizing adjuvant chemotherapy regimens, risk stratification based on tumor biology and stage considerations, emerging molecular diagnostic tests, and quality of life in cancer survivors, you would be forgiven for thinking that they are about breast cancer. So welcome to the new breast cancer: colon cancer. This issue of the Journal of the National Comprehensive Cancer Network highlights many of the new trends in colorectal cancer management. These trends epitomize the kind of changes that have redefined care in breast cancer and that are now being extended into other major tumor types. Heterogeneity that is a familiar part of the treatment dialogue in lymphoma and breast cancer is now also seen in colon cancer, promising a new wave of refinements in pathology, treatment selection, and tailored therapies. These are welcome changes. Colorectal cancer accounts for the second largest toll of cancer deaths in the United States, after lung cancer and before breast and prostate cancers. Recent years have shown real progress with the availability of new chemotherapy agents and biologically targeted drugs that seem to improve outcomes in both advanced and early stage disease. Insights into molecular subtypes of colon cancer may determine both risk and treatment. What can experts in colon cancer learn from breast cancer? First, guidelines may need to be restructured to accommodate various colon cancer subsets and provide recommendations for each tumor type, first in the metastatic, and eventually...
Full access

Harold J. Burstein

This year marks the sixth volume of JNCCN—The Journal of the National Comprehensive Cancer Network. What began as a quarterly publication has expanded to 10 issues per year with multiple additional supplements, with a subscription base of more than 20,000 oncologists and other health care practitioners per issue. JNCCN has been accepted for indexing in PubMed/MEDLINE since 2005, making the NCCN guidelines and original articles published in it available worldwide in the leading databases of medical research. I am honored to serve as the next editor-in-chief of JNCCN. The NCCN includes 21 of the leading cancer centers in the United States, bringing together the multidisciplinary expertise of all types of cancer specialists. The “jewels in the crown” are the NCCN Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology, the most comprehensive, up-to-date guides for managing cancers of all types. These guidelines are authored by panels composed of experts from all cancer-related disciplines—pathologists, radiologists, surgeons, medical oncologists, radiation oncologists, cancer survivors, and other clinicians focused on cancer care and prevention. The breadth, depth, and timeliness of the NCCN guidelines, along with their origin from the outstanding cancer clinics in this country, give them unique authority in defining treatment standards. JNCCN is committed to publishing these essential and scholarly cancer care documents and seeks additionally to create “value added” for the reader interested in understanding the evolving nature of cancer treatment. In the issues to come, we hope to expand the commentary that accompanies the guidelines, highlighting areas of disagreement or controversy or pointing to...
Full access

Jennifer A. Ligibel and Crystal S. Denlinger

“The number of cancer survivors in the United States has been increasing fairly exponentially over the past 30 years or so,” said Jennifer A. Ligibel, MD, Assistant Professor, Department of Medicine, Harvard Medical School, and Senior Physician

Full access

NCCN Guidelines Insights: Survivorship, Version 2.2020

Featured Updates to the NCCN Guidelines

Crystal S. Denlinger, Tara Sanft, Javid J. Moslehi, Linda Overholser, Saro Armenian, K. Scott Baker, Gregory Broderick, Wendy Demark-Wahnefried, Debra L. Friedman, Mindy Goldman, Norah Lynn Henry, Christine Hill-Kayser, Melissa Hudson, Nazanin Khakpour, Divya Koura, Allison L. McDonough, Michelle Melisko, Kathi Mooney, Halle C. F. Moore, Natalie Moryl, Tracey O’Connor, Electra D. Paskett, Chirayu Patel, Lindsay Peterson, William Pirl, M. Alma Rodriguez, Kathryn J. Ruddy, Lillie Shockney, Sophia Smith, Karen L. Syrjala, Amye Tevaarwerk, Phyllis Zee, Nicole R. McMillian and Deborah A. Freedman-Cass

grant from Merck & Co., Inc. Overview The number of cancer survivors in the United States increased from approximately 3 million in 1971 to nearly 16.9 million in 2019. 1 – 3 These numbers are predicted to surpass 22 million by 2030. 3 This striking

Full access

Crystal S. Denlinger and Jennifer Ligibel

The National Coalition for Cancer Survivorship and the NCI consider a person to be a cancer survivor from diagnosis throughout the balance of his or her life, and include family, friends, and caregivers impacted by the diagnosis in the definition

Full access

Crystal S. Denlinger, Jennifer A. Ligibel, Madhuri Are, K. Scott Baker, Wendy Demark-Wahnefried, Don Dizon, Debra L. Friedman, Mindy Goldman, Lee Jones, Allison King, Grace H. Ku, Elizabeth Kvale, Terry S. Langbaum, Kristin Leonardi-Warren, Mary S. McCabe, Michelle Melisko, Jose G. Montoya, Kathi Mooney, Mary Ann Morgan, Javid J. Moslehi, Tracey O’Connor, Linda Overholser, Electra D. Paskett, Jeffrey Peppercorn, Muhammad Raza, M. Alma Rodriguez, Karen L. Syrjala, Susan G. Urba, Mark T. Wakabayashi, Phyllis Zee, Nicole R. McMillian and Deborah A. Freedman-Cass

quality of life in adult cancer survivors (QLACS) . Qual Life Res 2005 ; 14 : 1007 – 1023 . 2. Campbell HS Hall AE Sanson-Fisher RW . Development and validation of the Short-Form Survivor Unmet Needs Survey (SF-SUNS) . Support Care Cancer

Full access

Elyse R. Park, Jeffrey Peppercorn and Areej El-Jawahri

The 2006 Institute of Medicine (IOM) report, “From Cancer Patient to Cancer Survivor: Lost in Transition,” acknowledges the differences in the meaning of the term survivor . 1 Historically, to signify a period of decreased mortality risk, the

Full access

Crystal S. Denlinger and Andrea M. Barsevick

Edited by Kerrin G. Robinson

. References 1 Rowland JH . What are cancer survivors telling us? Cancer J 2008 ; 14 : 361 – 368 . 2 Jemal A Siegel R Ward E . Cancer Statistics, 2008 . CA Cancer J Clin 2008 ; 58 : 71 – 96 . 3 Rim SR Seeff L Ahmed F