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Crystal S. Denlinger, Robert W. Carlson, Madhuri Are, K. Scott Baker, Elizabeth Davis, Stephen B. Edge, Debra L. Friedman, Mindy Goldman, Lee Jones, Allison King, Elizabeth Kvale, Terry S. Langbaum, Jennifer A. Ligibel, Mary S. McCabe, Kevin T. McVary, Michelle Melisko, Jose G. Montoya, Kathi Mooney, Mary Ann Morgan, Tracey O’Connor, Electra D. Paskett, Muhammad Raza, Karen L. Syrjala, Susan G. Urba, Mark T. Wakabayashi, Phyllis Zee, Nicole McMillian and Deborah Freedman-Cass

vaginal and cervical cancer found that the prevalence of sexual problems was significantly higher among survivors than among age- and race-matched controls from the National Health and Social Life Survey (mean number of problems 2.6 vs 1.1; P <.001). 18

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.2014.0034 Cervical Cancer Screening Partridge Edward E. 1 MD Abu-Rustum Nadeem 2 MD Giuliano Anna 3 PhD Massad Stewart 4 MD McClure Joan 5 MS Dwyer Mary 5 MS Hughes Miranda 5 PhD 03 2014 12 12 3 3 333 333

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NCCN Framework for Resource Stratification of NCCN Guidelines Now Available NCCN has published the NCCN Framework for Resource Stratification of NCCN Guidelines (NCCN Framework) for Cervical Cancer. The NCCN Framework accounts for

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Demetra Hypatia Hufnagel, Sumit Tushar Mehta, Chinyere Ezekwe, Alaina J. Brown, Alicia Beeghly-Fadiel and Lauren Shore Prescott

presentation, 39% had uterine cancer, 30% had ovarian cancer, 26% had cervical cancer, and 5% had vulvar or vaginal cancer. When the population of patients with anemia at initial presentation was evaluated based on disease site, 15% of those with uterine cancer

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Margaret Tempero

A decade ago, one of the most important advances in the history of oncology occurred. After the understanding that human papillomavirus (HPV) infection increased the risk of cervical cancer by more than 400-fold, vaccines were created to prevent

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Margaret Tempero

a very high risk of 9-year mortality had received some form of cancer screening. Even more odd, approximately one-third of women who had undergone a hysterectomy and presumably didn’t have a cervix were screened for cervical cancer. What were their

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risk individuals should be made on an individual basis. ➤ Breast Cancer: See the NCCN Guidelines for Breast Cancer Screening ➤ Cervical Cancer: See the NCCN Guidelines for Cervical Cancer Screening ➤ Prostate Cancer: See the NCCN

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Van K. Morris and Cathy Eng

similar to other results reported in a separate series of patients with nonmetastatic SCCA (3.5 genomic alterations per tumor). 35 This low mutation frequency for SCCA is consistent with other HPV-associated malignancies, such as cervical cancer (2

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Jimmie C. Holland, Brian J. Kelly and Mark I. Weinberger

associated with specific cancer sites based on the origin of the disease, the perceived role of health behaviors or lifestyle and prevailing views about its preventability (i.e., lung cancer and smoking, cervical cancer and sexual activity), and the effects

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Ashwin Shinde, Richard Li, Arya Amini, Yi-Jen Chen, Mihaela Cristea, Wenge Wang, Mark Wakabyashi, Ernest Han, Catheryn Yashar, Kevin Albuquerque, Sushil Beriwal and Scott Glaser

lymph nodes would be consistent with the treatment approach of other pelvic malignancies, such as anal and cervical cancer. Increased knowledge of cancer biology, together with improvements in both systemic and locoregional therapy, has redefined