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Roswell Park Cancer Institute

Approximately 11,960 people will be diagnosed with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) in 2005, and 9,000 patients will die of the disease. As the population ages, the incidence of AML, along with myelodysplasia, appears to be rising. Equally disturbing is the increasing incidence of treatment-related myelodysplasia and leukemia in survivors of tumors of childhood and young adulthood such as Hodgkin's disease, sarcomas, breast and testicular cancers, and lymphomas. Recent large clinical trials have highlighted the need for new, innovative strategies because outcomes for AML patients, particularly older patients, have not substantially changed in the past 3 decades.

For the most recent version of the guidelines, please visit NCCN.org

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.6004/jnccn.2007.0033 Soft Tissue Sarcoma Guidelines 04 2007 5 5 4 4 364 364 364 364 0050364 10.6004/jnccn.2007.0034 Treatment of Advanced Soft Tissue Sarcoma: Conventional Agents and Promising New Drugs Wagner Andrew MD, PhD 04 2007 5 5 4 4

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Rodger J. Winn

One of the strengths of clinical practice guidelines is their dynamic nature. Rather than representing absolute truths, they reflect the best evidence available when they are produced. Periodic review is, therefore, mandatory. Given the prodigious outpouring of new data in oncology, NCCN has determined that guidelines must be reviewed at least annually to remain valid, with interim modifications for important information emerging within the cycle. This pursuit of change is at the core of guidelines utility: to provide a basis for physician and patient decision-making, they must be as up-to-date as the data. For the most part, innovations—new technology advances, either in the diagnostic or therapeutic realms—lead to changes. Often these changes are incremental, such as replacing previously recommended adjuvant regimens with new combinations reported in well-conducted randomized trials. In some instances, new technologies can change the entire approach to a disease, as seen in how GIST tumors are managed now that responsiveness to imatinib mesylate and subsequent agents was demonstrated. In this case, GIST was separated from a group of sarcomas for which relatively similar care had been recommended. In this issue, Andersen et al. address the current management of lobular neoplasia of the breast. As they note, for the past 20 years, lobular carcinoma in situ (LCIS) was considered a risk marker for subsequent breast cancer but not a malignant lesion itself. The therapeutic implications of this idea were that no further treatment other than biopsy was required, even if margins were positive. What Anderson et al. elegantly...
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-Friendly Guide Offers Free Step-by-Step Information for People With Soft Tissue Sarcoma People with various soft tissue sarcoma diagnoses need access to state-of-the-art treatment information in easy-to-understand language. NCCN has published the NCCN

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Sarcoma Demetri George D. MD Antonia Scott MD, PhD Benjamin Robert S. MD Bui Marilyn M. MD, PhD Casper Ephraim S. MD Conrad Ernest U. III MD DeLaney Thomas F. MD Ganjoo Kristen N. MD Heslin Martin J

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.2005.0011 Role of New Chemotherapy Agents in Soft Tissue Sarcoma von Mehren Margaret MD 3 2005 3 3 2 2 198 198 205 205 10.6004/jnccn.2005.0012 Adjuvant Therapy for Soft Tissue Sarcoma Schuetze Scott M. * MD, PhD Ray Michael E

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sarcoma subtypes. In the phase II trial of pazopanib conducted by the EORTC, the progression-free survival (PFS) rate at 12 weeks exceeded 40% for patients with leiomyosarcomas, synovial cell sarcomas, and other eligible sarcomas, but not liposarcomas. In

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sarcoma subtypes. In the phase II trial of pazopanib conducted by the EORTC, the progression-free rate at 12 weeks exceeded 40% for patients with leiomyosarcomas, synovial cell sarcomas, and other eligible sarcomas, but not liposarcomas. In the group of

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previous phase II trial in certain sarcoma subtypes. In the phase II trial of pazopanib conducted by the EORTC, the progression-free rate at 12 weeks exceeded 40% for patients with leiomyosarcomas, synovial cell sarcomas, and other eligible sarcomas, but

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Sarcomas Principal Investigator: David Loeb, MD, PhD Condition: Sarcoma Institution: The Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center at Johns Hopkins The effectiveness of treatments for recurrent sarcomas is quite limited. One hypothesis to explain