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Wui-Jin Koh, Nadeem R. Abu-Rustum, Sarah Bean, Kristin Bradley, Susana M. Campos, Kathleen R. Cho, Hye Sook Chon, Christina Chu, David Cohn, Marta Ann Crispens, Shari Damast, Oliver Dorigo, Patricia J. Eifel, Christine M. Fisher, Peter Frederick, David K. Gaffney, Suzanne George, Ernest Han, Susan Higgins, Warner K. Huh, John R. Lurain III, Andrea Mariani, David Mutch, Christa Nagel, Larissa Nekhlyudov, Amanda Nickles Fader, Steven W. Remmenga, R. Kevin Reynolds, Todd Tillmanns, Stefanie Ueda, Emily Wyse, Catheryn M. Yashar, Nicole R. McMillian and Jillian L. Scavone

estimated that 61,380 new uterine cancer cases will occur in 2017, with 10,920 deaths resulting from the disease. 1 Stromal or mesenchymal sarcomas are uncommon subtypes accounting for approximately 3% of all uterine cancers. 2 , 3 The NCCN Guidelines for

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Stuart L. Cramer, Rong Li, Siraj Ali, Julie A. Bradley, Hee K. Kim and Joseph G. Pressey

has been detected in PMMTI, 2 a molecular alteration identical to the hallmark feature found in most clear cell sarcoma of the kidney tumors (CCSK). 3 – 6 The clinical course of PMMTI is often indolent, with multiple recurrences reported in some

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Yong Li, Xian Chen, Yanchun Qu, Jia-Ming Fan, Yan Li, Hui Peng, Yaojie Zheng, Yihong Zhang and Hai-Bo Zhang

tissue sarcoma. Almost half of IMT cases carry ALK gene rearrangement that can be treated using ALK inhibitors, 4 – 6 but therapeutic options for ALK -negative tumors are limited. ALK -negative IMTs may be more aggressive, with a higher frequency

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Rodger J. Winn

epirubicin with or without ifosfamide for adult soft-tissue sarcoma . Am J Clin Oncol 2002 ; 25 : 468 – 473 . 11 Lara PN Higdon R Lim N . Prospective evaluation of cancer clinical trial accrual patterns: identifying potential barriers to

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Rachel A. Bender Ignacio, Lilie L. Lin, Lakshmi Rajdev and Elizabeth Chiao

-negative populations, such as Kaposi sarcoma (KS) or anal cancer. This review summarizes and highlights current HIVAM clinical trials, with emphasis on 4 mechanistic areas: immunomodulatory therapies and gene therapies, including immune checkpoint inhibitors (ICIs

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Margaret R. O'Donnell, Camille N. Abboud, Jessica Altman, Frederick R. Appelbaum, Steven E. Coutre, Lloyd E. Damon, James M. Foran, Salil Goorha, Lori J. Maness, Guido Marcucci, Peter Maslak, Michael M. Millenson, Joseph O. Moore, Farhad Ravandi, Paul J. Shami, B. Douglas Smith, Richard M. Stone, Stephen A. Strickland, Martin S. Tallman and Eunice S. Wang

increasing incidence of treatment-related myelodysplasia and leukemia in survivors of childhood tumors and young adulthood, such as Hodgkin disease, sarcomas, breast and testicular cancers, and lymphomas. Ionizing radiation and occupational exposure to

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Dermatofibrosarcoma protuberans (DFSP) is an uncommon, low-grade sarcoma of fibroblast origin with an incidence rate of 0.8 cases per million persons per year. It rarely metastasizes. However, initial misdiagnosis, prolonged time to correct diagnosis, and large tumor size at the time of diagnosis are common. NCCN's Non-Melanoma Skin Cancer panel has developed a guideline outlining treatment of DFSP to supplement the squamous cell and basal cell skin cancers guidelines. The NCCN Sarcoma Panel also provided expert input in the development of this DFSP guideline.

For the most recent version of the guidelines, please visit NCCN.org

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Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center/Seattle Cancer Care Alliance

Primary bone cancers are extremely rare neoplasms, accounting for less than 0.2% of all cancers. Primary bone cancers show wide clinical heterogeneity and, perhaps most importantly, are often curable. With current multimodality treatment, including multi-agent chemotherapy, approximately three quarters of all patients diagnosed with osteosarcoma are cured. Updates for 2007 include changes in recommendations for treating chondrosarcoma, Ewing's sarcoma, and osteosarcoma.

For the most recent version of the guidelines, please visit NCCN.org

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Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center

Dermatofibrosarcoma protuberans (DFSP) is an uncommon, low-grade sarcoma of fibroblast origin with an incidence rate of 0.8 cases per million persons each year. Although it rarely metastasizes, initial misdiagnosis, prolonged time to accurate diagnosis, and large tumor size at diagnosis are common. These updated 2007 guidelines include changes in recommendations for considering radiation therapy, as well as those regarding surgical margins in some patients.

For the most recent version of the guidelines, please visit NCCN.org

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Rodger J. Winn

Last November, the European Society for Medical Oncology/American Society of Clinical Oncology (ESMO/ASCO) Task Force on Global Curriculum in Medical Oncology published its recommendations.1 This comprehensive report detailed the elements trainees needed to assume a role in the multi-disciplinary milieu that is optimal oncologic care. Scanning these elements, I am immediately reminded that the knowledge required is considerably larger than just technologic expertise specific to administering drugs or managing chemotherapy-related complications. Rather, the practice of medical oncology today demands a broad orientation to all therapeutic modalities so that all team members appreciate the ramifications of each contribution to the overall management plan. For example, for soft tissue sarcomas, the curriculum calls for the trainee to “know the appropriate surgery for initial diagnosis and the indications for limb preservation.” At first glance, this requirement may seem fairly easy to achieve. However, as Randall and Gowski's article in this issue, on managing grade I chondrosarcoma of bone, shows, comprehensive management is far from routine or superficially addressed. The important clinical determination of a benign enchondroma from a low-grade chondrosarcoma carries with it major therapeutic implications, but data from a broad range of pathological and radiologic procedures still lead to a large diagnostic gray area. As an aside, the paper highlights why the NCCN guidelines recommend that sarcomas be managed by a team of professionals with expertise in sarcomas. Can a pathologist without vast experience distinguish between an “enchondromatous encasement pattern” and a pattern of hyaline or myxoid cartilage permeating lamellar...