Search Results

You are looking at 31 - 40 of 763 items for :

Clear All
Full access

Allison Matthews, Surbhi Sidana, Lauren Seymour, Nancy Pick, James Pringnitz, David Argue, Gina Lange, Eva Brandes, Allison McClanahan, Adrienne Nedved, Suzanne Hayman, Saad Kenderian, Shaji Kumar, David Dingli, Taxiarchis Kourelis, Rahma Warsame, Prashant Kapoor, Mithun Shah, Hassan Alkhateeb, Patrick Johnston, Stephen Ansell, Nabila Bennani, Mustaqeem Siddiqui and Yi Lin

real time and patient/caregivers were interviewed to understand the impact of these activities. Results: Several themes emerged from qualitative interviews with patients and caregivers. From the themes, interventions were developed. We were able to

Full access

Anna M. Gibson and Claire Sutherby

patients received appropriate empiric antibiotics; 4 of 7 patients received first dose within 1 hour of presentation to ED. Conclusions: Despite small numbers and incomplete compliance with guidelines, we were able to identify a 2.8 day decrease in

Full access

Christie Hancock and Jacob Bitran

. NGS changed management in 12 cases. Two patients were able to enter a clinical trial and the other 10 had therapeutic changes based on protein or mRNA overexpression. Median time of change in management to survival in these patients was 7 months

Full access

David da Silva Dias, Catarina Jorge, Mafalda Baptista, Ana Júlia Arede, Paulo Luz, Tânia Madureira and Beatriz Gosalbez

center is now in progress. Low risk FN was observed in 11% of admitted patients. Our center has an internal protocol and has been able to provide a good overall response.

Full access

Efrat Dotan, Ilene Browner, Arti Hurria and Crystal Denlinger

.medscape.org/journal/jnccn ; (4) view/print certificate. Release date: February 6, 2012; Expiration date: February 6, 2013. Learning Objectives Upon completion of this activity, participants will be able to: Analyze colon cancer outcomes among older adults Evaluate

Full access

Aparna Parikh, Chloe Atreya, W. Michael Korn and Alan P. Venook

with capecitabine and oxaliplatin plus bevacizumab after 2 months with significant functional decline. Next-generation sequencing (NGS) of the primary tumor identified HER2 amplification and we were able to obtain trastuzumab-DM1 for off-label use

Full access

Nikhil Khandelwal, Ian Duncan, Tamim Ahmed, Elan Rubinstein and Cheryl Pegus

chemotherapy dosing regimens have been able to “reframe some cancers as chronic diseases requiring chronic therapy.” 2 However, oral agents that are used for liver and renal cancer (i.e., sorafenib), 3 gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST; i.e., sunitinib

Full access

Andrea Feldstain, Barry D. Bultz, Janet de Groot, Amane Abdul-Razzak, Leonie Herx, Lyle Galloway, Srini Chary and Aynharan Sinnarajah

part of the team includes a pharmacist and either a physician or nurse practitioner. The psychosocial clinician may have been asked to attend if referrals indicated psychosocial concerns. Second, if patients were able to wait 2 to 3 weeks and/or did not

Full access

Jimmie C. Holland, Barbara Andersen, William S. Breitbart, Bruce Compas, Moreen M. Dudley, Stewart Fleishman, Caryl D. Fulcher, Donna B. Greenberg, Carl B. Greiner, George F. Handzo, Laura Hoofring, Paul B. Jacobsen, Sara J. Knight, Kate Learson, Michael H. Levy, Matthew J. Loscalzo, Sharon Manne, Randi McAllister-Black, Michelle B. Riba, Kristin Roper, Alan D. Valentine, Lynne I. Wagner and Michael A. Zevon

% are actually identified and referred for psychosocial help. 3 Many cancer patients who are in need of psychosocial care are not able to get the help they need due to the under recognition of patient's psychological needs by the primary oncology team

Full access

Daniel B. Martin, Sean Silas, Audrey Covner, Paul C. Hendrie and F. Marc Stewart

Conversion to the International Classification of Diseases, 10th Revision, Clinical Modification (ICD-10-CM) was mandated for October 1, 2014, but was delayed by one year. ICD-10 accommodates newly developed diagnoses and procedures and is expected to help measure quality of care. When implemented, it will impact oncology practices because of conversion costs, loss of productivity, and billing problems. Clinical documentation must meet the specificity required by ICD-10 codes or risk denial of payments, which are projected to dramatically increase. In preparation for the now delayed conversion, the ICD-10 transition team at the Seattle Cancer Care Alliance (SCCA) examined the ICD-10 codes for primary hematology/oncology diagnoses and comorbidities of cancer and therapy seen at our institution to identify the need for and feasibility of developing a printable job aid to guide clinical documentation. We found that the variable complexity of ICD-10 codes in hematology/oncology frequently requires nonintuitive specificity likely to be overlooked without prompting. We were able to develop a succinct and facile documentation aid usable in both electronic and printed forms that includes all hematology/oncology diagnoses and the comorbidities most frequently seen in our multidisciplinary institution. This document is organized in a notebook format for easy review and will be continuously improved with feedback from practitioners. It is available for free download from the SCCA Web site.