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Although cervical cancer is more of a problem in developing countries than in the United States, an estimated 10,520 new cases will be diagnosed in the U.S. in 2004, and 3,900 deaths will result from the disease. Cervical cancer is a major world health problem for women. The global yearly incidence of cervical cancer is 371,000, and the annual death rate is 190,000. It is the third most common cancer in women worldwide. Seventy eight percent of cases occur in developing countries, where cervical cancer is the second most frequent cause of cancer death in women.

For the most recent version of the guidelines, please visit NCCN.org

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Akriti Gupta Jain, Abdul Kareem Khan, Ranjeet Kumar, Mohammed Wazir, Syed Askari Hasan and Umair Majeed

. Methods: We compared the relative frequency of search terms “Breast Cancer,” “Ovarian Cancer,” and “Cervical Cancer” between January 1, 2004 and December 31, 2017 (n=168 months) using Google Trends, a public web facility of Google Inc. The software

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Nadeem R. Abu-Rustum and Yukio Sonoda

F ertility-sparing radical vaginal or abdominal trachelectomy in select young women with stage I cervical cancer has become an acceptable alternative to radical hysterectomy in many gynecologic oncology practices worldwide. 1 – 8 The abdominal

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L. Stewart Massad

In cervical cancer prevention, as with modern oncology, new technology is increasing the complexity of management decisions. The core paradigm for cervical cancer prevention has not changed over the past 65 years: diagnose and destroy cancer

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Brandon A. Dyer, Dmitriy Zamarin, Ramez N. Eskandar and Jyoti M. Mayadev

Clinical Rationale to Explore Immunotherapy in Cervical Cancer Cervical cancer (CC) affects an estimated 12,900 women and accounts for 4,100 deaths annually in the United States, and is the most common gynecologic cancer worldwide. 1 The

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Despite a significant decrease in the incidence and mortality of cervical carcinoma in the United States, 10,520 women are expected to develop the disease in 2004, with 3,900 expected deaths. Because cervical cytology screening is the current method for early detection of this neoplasm, the purpose of the NCCN Cervical Cancer Screening Guidelines is to provide direction for the evaluation and management of cervical cytology.

For the most recent version of the guidelines, please visit NCCN.org

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Rodger J. Winn

One of the cancer-related Healthy People 2010 goals is to decrease deaths from cancer of the cervix in the U.S. from 3/100,000 to 2/100,000. The basis for this goal is the tremendous impact of the Papanicolaou (Pap) test in reducing mortality from this once common and devastating cancer. Over the past 50 years, U.S. death rates have dropped by 75%, and the target is certainly possible if screening and appropriate follow-up can be extended to all women. Given the remarkable effectiveness of cervical screening in lowering mortality, we must still recognize that the Pap test is only moderately accurate. Fortunately, the long preinvasive phase of cervical cancer and the successful public health initiatives that foster regular follow-up examinations lead to repeated opportunities to discover the neoplasm when it is curable. The NCCN Cervical Screening Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology provide a valuable roadmap for ensuring that appropriate steps are taken when routine examination shows abnormalities. A third factor leading to success has been the concerted educational and quality assurance programs to minimize laboratory variation and error. Therefore, noting the two major advances in the science of cervical screening in the past several years is gratifying: the use liquid-based cytology (LBC) to process Pap specimens and the use of human papillomavirus (HPV) testing to help guide the interpretation abnormal tests. In his review of the extensive trials comparing conventional Pap and LBC preparations, Cox notes that the new modality appears to be more sensitive in finding both low- and high-grade squamous...
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Omar Abdel-Rahman

aged 50 to 74 years with complete information about mammography use and its timing. 5 Women were considered adherent to the CTFPHC breast cancer screening guidelines if they had mammography performed within the last 2 years. The cervical cancer

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Martha Isabel Junio Parroco and Genalin Fabul Amparo

Recurrence of cervical cancer is one of the most important and significant discussions in Gynecologic Oncology especially in patients with locally advanced stage. The over-all goal of this study is to detect over-all recurrence and survival rate for

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Robert W. Carlson, Jillian L. Scavone, Wui-Jin Koh, Joan S. McClure, Benjamin E. Greer, Rashmi Kumar, Nicole R. McMillian and Benjamin O. Anderson

Guidelines, and to understand which therapies are optimally applied in each given resource setting ( Figure 1 ). Results The first resource-stratified framework developed by NCCN was for the treatment of cervical cancer. The NCCN Guidelines for