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Heidi J. Gray

B Murphy J . A comparison of laparoscopic-assisted radical vaginal hysterectomy and radical abdominal hysterectomy in the treatment of cervical cancer . Gynecol Oncol 2004 ; 93 : 588 – 593 . 12. Peters WA III Liu PY Barrett RJ Jr

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Michael A. Gold

surgical staging of cervical cancer . Am J Obstet Gynecol 1972 ; 11 : 1090 – 1096 . 2. Ballon SC Berman ML Lagasse LD . Survival after extraperitoneal pelvic and paraaortic lymphadenectomy and radiation therapy in cervical carcinoma . Obstet

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Kathryn P. Pennington, Renata R. Urban and Heidi J. Gray

Use of minimally invasive surgery (MIS) in the management of early-stage cervical cancer (ESCC), previously considered an acceptable alternative to open surgery, 1 was recently challenged by results of the Laparoscopic Approach to Cervical

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Stanford Comprehensive Cancer Center

An estimated 11,150 new cases of cervical cancer will be diagnosed in the United States in 2007; 3670 deaths are expected from the disease. Although cervical cancer rates are decreasing among women in the United States, it remains a major world health problem. It is the third most common cancer in women worldwide, with 78% of cases occurring in developing countries. Because persistent human papillomavirus (HPV) infection is considered the most important factor contributing to the development of cervical cancer, immunization against HPV is expected to prevent some cancer. The NCCN Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology discuss this and other epidemiologic risk factors, as well as treatment options.

For the most recent version of the guidelines, please visit NCCN.org

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Christopher Loiselle and Wui-Jin Koh

Describe clinical scenarios for which IMRT is indicated and those for which it is less useful I n 2010, the American Cancer Society (ACS) has estimated that 12,200 cases of uterine cervical cancer will be diagnosed and 4210 deaths will occur from

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NCCN Guidelines Insights: Cervical Cancer, Version 1.2020

Featured Updates to the NCCN Guidelines

Nadeem R. Abu-Rustum, Catheryn M. Yashar, Sarah Bean, Kristin Bradley, Susana M. Campos, Hye Sook Chon, Christina Chu, David Cohn, Marta Ann Crispens, Shari Damast, Christine M. Fisher, Peter Frederick, David K. Gaffney, Robert Giuntoli II, Ernest Han, Warner K. Huh, John R. Lurain III, Andrea Mariani, David Mutch, Christa Nagel, Larissa Nekhlyudov, Amanda Nickles Fader, Steven W. Remmenga, R. Kevin Reynolds, Rachel Sisodia, Todd Tillmanns, Stefanie Ueda, Renata Urban, Emily Wyse, Nicole R. McMillian and Angela D. Motter

to: Integrate into professional practice the updates to the NCCN Guidelines for Cervical Cancer Describe the rationale behind the decision-making process for developing the NCCN Guidelines for Cervical Cancer Disclosure of Relevant Financial

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Stephanie Alimena, Suvidya Lakshmi Pachigolla, Sarah Feldman, David Yang, Peter F. Orio III, Larissa Lee and Martin King

Background Black women have the highest incidence of and mortality from cervical cancer in the United States. 1 , 2 Minority women with cervical cancer are often diagnosed at a higher stage than White women 3 and are less likely to receive optimal

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Lois Ramondetta

Case Study MS is a 54-year-old woman with biopsy-proven recurrent cervical cancer in the previously irradiated pelvic field, who presented for a second opinion. She had no measurable disease according to CT or MRI, and had bilateral

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Stanford Comprehensive Cancer Center

Cervical carcinoma remains a health issue for women worldwide. Cervical cytology screening is the current method for early detection, and the NCCN Cervical Cancer Screening Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology provide direction for evaluating and managing this process, including clarified and revised recommendations on screening techniques and intervals and follow-up of abnormal screening results, including colposcopy. Human papillomavirus (HPV) DNA testing for primary cervical cancer has been approved by the FDA, and HPV DNA testing for high-risk virus types can also be used as a component of both primary screening and workup of abnormal cytology results. Colposcopy, along with colposcopically directed biopsies, has become the primary method for evaluating women with abnormal cervical cytologies. Special considerations for colposcopy performed during pregnancy are also discussed.

For the most recent version of the guidelines, please visit NCCN.org

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Warner K. Huh

With the introduction of widespread Pap smear screening starting in the 1940s, the United States has seen at least a 50% reduction in the incidence and mortality of invasive cervical cancer. In light of the ease of sampling, the long pre