Search Results

You are looking at 121 - 130 of 614 items for :

  • "surveillance" x
Clear All
Full access

James L. Mohler

spawned new interest in active surveillance as an option for the management of clinically localized prostate cancer. In 2009, the NCCN Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology (NCCN Guidelines) for Prostate Cancer were the first cancer guidelines to

Full access

Robert J. Motzer, Neeraj Agarwal, Clair Beard, Sam Bhayani, Graeme B. Bolger, Mark K. Buyyounouski, Michael A. Carducci, Sam S. Chang, Toni K. Choueiri, Shilpa Gupta, Steven L. Hancock, Gary R. Hudes, Eric Jonasch, Timothy M. Kuzel, Clayton Lau, Ellis G. Levine, Daniel W. Lin, Kim A. Margolin, M. Dror Michaelson, Thomas Olencki, Roberto Pili, Thomas W. Ratliff, Bruce G. Redman, Cary N. Robertson, Charles J. Ryan, Joel Sheinfeld, Jue Wang and Richard B. Wilder

after initial orchiectomy include surveillance, radiotherapy, or chemotherapy with 1 or 2 cycles of carboplatin. The disease-specific survival for stage I disease is 99%, irrespective of the management strategy used. 16 Several prospective nonrandomized

Full access

Anne M. Covey

In an Italian study that compared 6- and 12-month surveillance, 15 the researchers found that 6-month surveillance increased detection of HCC amenable to curative treatment and improved OS (45 vs 30 months, respectively). Ability to Treat Once

Full access

a new algorithm. OSTEO-4 Under “Surveillance”: 6th bullet was modified to include “Orthopedic and Oncologic.” BONE-A Under “Core Group”: “Musculoskeletal oncologist” was added and “surgical oncologist” was omitted

Full access

Peter A. Ubel

surveillance, surgery, and radiotherapy. Each option has pros and cons, which are weighed differently by different patients. In brief, Dr. Ubel noted, the conversation with the patient could go something like, “You can have a surveillance strategy that

Full access

Gold Standard for Prostate Cancer Care Kawachi Mark H. MD 08 2007 5 5 7 7 689 689 692 692 0050689 10.6004/jnccn.2007.0059 Point: Active Surveillance for Favorable Risk Prostate Cancer Klotz Laurence MD, FRCSC 08 2007 5 5 7 7 693

Full access

footnote “k” was added: “Ta verrucous carcinoma is by definition a well-differentiated tumor and would require surveillance alone of inguinal lymph nodes.” Footnote “n” was added: “A modified/superficial inguinal dissection with intraoperative frozen

Full access

James L. Mohler, Andrew J. Armstrong, Robert R. Bahnson, Anthony Victor D'Amico, Brian J. Davis, James A. Eastham, Charles A. Enke, Thomas A. Farrington, Celestia S. Higano, Eric M. Horwitz, Michael Hurwitz, Christopher J. Kane, Mark H. Kawachi, Michael Kuettel, Richard J. Lee, Joshua J. Meeks, David F. Penson, Elizabeth R. Plimack, Julio M. Pow-Sang, David Raben, Sylvia Richey, Mack Roach III, Stan Rosenfeld, Edward Schaeffer, Ted A. Skolarus, Eric J. Small, Guru Sonpavde, Sandy Srinivas, Seth A. Strope, Jonathan Tward, Dorothy A. Shead and Deborah A. Freedman-Cass

figures. Risk Stratification Management approaches for locoregional prostate cancer include surgery, radiotherapy, active surveillance (actively monitoring disease, with curative-intent intervention if cancer progresses), observation (monitoring

Full access

Benjamin L. Franc, Timothy P. Copeland, Robert Thombley, Miran Park, Ben Marafino, Mitzi L. Dean, W. John Boscardin, Hope S. Rugo, David Seidenwurm, Bhupinder Sharma, Stephen R. Johnston and R. Adams Dudley

breast cancer diagnosed by age 50 years, receive dedicated breast MRI annually. 2 ASCO and NCCN have issued guidelines stating that, after initial treatment, surveillance for recurrence in patients with stage I–III breast cancer should include periodic

Full access

Heather Hampel

their relatives to undergo genetic counseling and testing to learn if they too are at increased risk for cancer and could benefit from intensive cancer surveillance. The costs of screening can be offset by the benefits of cancer prevention in the patient