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Rupali Roy and Leo I. Gordon

, diffuse alveolar hemorrhage, pulmonary cysts, and pulmonary hypertension. Few data exist regarding late toxicity from rituximab, but late-onset neutropenia (LON) has emerged. Rituximab-associated LON is defined by most investigators as grade III to IV

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Dawn Goetz

seen grade 3 or 4 adverse effects are neutropenia, febrile neutropenia, anemia, leukopenia, diarrhea, fatigue, and asthenia. The approximate neutrophil nadir is 12 days, and cabazitaxel carries a black box warning against giving the drug to patients

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Allison Lipitz-Snyderman, Adam Klotz, Renee L. Gennarelli and Jeffrey Groeger

for oncologic emergencies are identified, such as evolving risk stratification paradigms for febrile neutropenia, observation status will likely play an increasing role. 20 The NCI has identified the management of oncologic emergencies as an important

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neutropenia (grade 3: 69%; grade 4: 29%), febrile neutropenia (8%), thrombocytopenia (37%), and anemia (25%). Seven patients experienced treatment-related serious AEs, with 1 grade 5 event. Of the evaluable patients, 80% and 7% achieved clinical complete and

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Philip L. McCarthy

the maintenance studies were primarily hematologic, especially neutropenia and, to a lesser extent, thrombocytopenia and anemia. 4 - 7 , 33 The role of maintenance therapy following induction therapy without AHSCT is discussed in detail in Part II by

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Antonio Palumbo and Roberto Mina

%-59%). Neutropenia is one of the major toxicities associated with lenalidomide administration, and grade 3/4 events were reported in 7% of patients receiving lenalidomide continuously. In these patients, the rate of thrombocytopenia was 6%, and no extrahematologic

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William J. Gradishar, Benjamin O. Anderson, Jame Abraham, Rebecca Aft, Doreen Agnese, Kimberly H. Allison, Sarah L. Blair, Harold J. Burstein, Chau Dang, Anthony D. Elias, Sharon H. Giordano, Matthew P. Goetz, Lori J. Goldstein, Steven J. Isakoff, Jairam Krishnamurthy, Janice Lyons, P. Kelly Marcom, Jennifer Matro, Ingrid A. Mayer, Meena S. Moran, Joanne Mortimer, Ruth M. O'Regan, Sameer A. Patel, Lori J. Pierce, Hope S. Rugo, Amy Sitapati, Karen Lisa Smith, Mary Lou Smith, Hatem Soliman, Erica M. Stringer-Reasor, Melinda L. Telli, John H. Ward, Jessica S. Young, Jennifer L. Burns and Rashmi Kumar

. 28 Grade 3 and 4 adverse effects seen with the combination of palbociclib and letrozole included neutropenia (66.5% vs 1.4%), leukopenia (24.8% vs 0%), anemia (5.4% vs 1.8%), and fatigue (1.8% vs 0.5%). 28 Ribociclib in combination with letrozole was

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Shaji K. Kumar, Natalie S. Callander, Kehinde Adekola, Larry Anderson, Muhamed Baljevic, Erica Campagnaro, Jorge J. Castillo, Jason C. Chandler, Caitlin Costello, Yvonne Efebera, Matthew Faiman, Alfred Garfall, Kelly Godby, Jens Hillengass, Leona Holmberg, Myo Htut, Carol Ann Huff, Yubin Kang, Malin Hultcrantz, Sarah Larson, Michaela Liedtke, Thomas Martin, James Omel, Kenneth Shain, Douglas Sborov, Keith Stockerl-Goldstein, Donna Weber, Jennifer Keller and Rashmi Kumar

months, 24-month PFS was estimated at 92%.The most common grade 3 and 4 toxicities in ≥10% of patients included hypophosphatemia (25%), hyperglycemia (23%), anemia (21%), thrombocytopenia (17%), and neutropenia (17%). Peripheral neuropathy was limited to

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Jaffer A. Ajani, Thomas A. D'Amico, Khaldoun Almhanna, David J. Bentrem, Joseph Chao, Prajnan Das, Crystal S. Denlinger, Paul Fanta, Farhood Farjah, Charles S. Fuchs, Hans Gerdes, Michael Gibson, Robert E. Glasgow, James A. Hayman, Steven Hochwald, Wayne L. Hofstetter, David H. Ilson, Dawn Jaroszewski, Kimberly L. Johung, Rajesh N. Keswani, Lawrence R. Kleinberg, W. Michael Korn, Stephen Leong, Catherine Linn, A. Craig Lockhart, Quan P. Ly, Mary F. Mulcahy, Mark B. Orringer, Kyle A. Perry, George A. Poultsides, Walter J. Scott, Vivian E. Strong, Mary Kay Washington, Benny Weksler, Christopher G. Willett, Cameron D. Wright, Debra Zelman, Nicole McMillian and Hema Sundar

4 neutropenia, alopecia, renal toxicity, and thromboembolism but with slightly higher incidences of grade 3 or 4 diarrhea and neuropathy. The toxic effects from fluorouracil and capecitabine were not different. ML 17032, another phase III

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Andrew D. Zelenetz, Leo I. Gordon, William G. Wierda, Jeremy S. Abramson, Ranjana H. Advani, C. Babis Andreadis, Nancy Bartlett, John C. Byrd, Myron S. Czuczman, Luis E. Fayad, Richard I. Fisher, Martha J. Glenn, Thomas M. Habermann, Nancy Lee Harris, Richard T. Hoppe, Steven M. Horwitz, Christopher R. Kelsey, Youn H. Kim, Susan Krivacic, Ann S. LaCasce, Auayporn Nademanee, Pierluigi Porcu, Oliver Press, Rachel Rabinovitch, Nishitha Reddy, Erin Reid, Ayman A. Saad, Lubomir Sokol, Lode J. Swinnen, Christina Tsien, Julie M. Vose, Lynn Wilson, Joachim Yahalom, Nadeem Zafar, Mary Dwyer and Hema Sundar

<.001) compared with rituximab plus chlorambucil. 81 The most frequent grade 3 or higher toxicities with obinutuzumab-chlorambucil included neutropenia (35%), infusion-related reactions (21%), thrombocytopenia (11%), and infections (11%). 81 The most