Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 15 items for

  • Author: Wui-Jin Koh x
  • All content x
Clear All Modify Search
Full access

Wui-Jin Koh

Full access

Christopher Loiselle and Wui-Jin Koh

Radiation therapy plays an important role in both the definitive and adjuvant treatment of patients with cervical cancer. However, although radiation therapy is effective in controlling tumor growth, associated acute and chronic adverse effects are well known. Intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) is increasingly being used to treat cervical cancer and has the potential to improve the therapeutic ratio because of its ability to escalate dose to cancer targets while sparing adjacent healthy tissue. Multiple dosimetric studies were initially performed, establishing the conceptual feasibility of IMRT in patients with cervical cancer. Subsequent early reported series of patients treated with IMRT showed dosimetric and clinical benefits, with reduction in acute gastrointestinal and hematologic toxicity compared with historic controls, particularly in the posthysterectomy setting. Consensus is evolving regarding the use of IMRT in treating cervical cancer, particularly in the posthysterectomy setting, and for dose escalation to para-aortic nodes and bulky sidewall disease. Target delineation in the context of internal organ motion and tumor shrinkage during a course of fractionated external-beam radiotherapy remains an area of active investigation. IMRT in treating cervical cancer in the setting of an intact uterus remains in its nascent stage and should be used judiciously only within clinical trials. Although not a routine substitute for brachytherapy, it may be considered as a boost for highly selected patients who are not brachytherapy candidates.

Full access

Benjamin E. Greer and Wui-Jin Koh

For the first time, NCCN Guidelines are available for vulvar cancer, a rare gynecologic cancer. Early-stage cancers can be managed by surgery and observation, and many of these patients can be cured. Lymph node status drives treatment and correlates with survival. Positive groinal nodes require additional therapy, including radiation plus chemotherapy, depending on stage. Sentinel lymph node biopsy is recommended in selected patients.

Full access

Presenters: Lillian R. Kreppel, Shivan J. Mehta, Mark H. Sawyer, Edward L. Trimble, Susan T. Vadaparampil, and moderated by Wui-Jin Koh

Infection with HPV is responsible for 5% of cancers, most of which are preventable with vaccination. Unfortunately, although vaccination rates are increasing in the United States, many adolescents remain unvaccinated due to a multifactorial set of barriers that are cultural, psychosocial, structural, and financial. At this Keynote session at the NCCN 2021 Virtual Annual Conference, a selection of expert panelists discussed efforts to improve vaccination rates.

Full access

Robert W. Carlson, Jillian L. Scavone, Wui-Jin Koh, Joan S. McClure, Benjamin E. Greer, Rashmi Kumar, Nicole R. McMillian, and Benjamin O. Anderson

More than 14 million new cancer cases and 8.2 million cancer deaths are estimated to occur worldwide on an annual basis. Of these, 57% of new cancer cases and 65% of cancer deaths occur in low- and middle-income countries. Disparities in available resources for health care are enormous and staggering. The WHO estimates that the United States and Canada have 10% of the global burden of disease, 37% of the world's health workers, and more than 50% of the world's financial resources for health; by contrast, the African region has 24% of the global burden of disease, 3% of health workers, and less than 1% of the world's financial resources for health. This disparity is even more extreme with cancer. NCCN has developed a framework for stratifying the NCCN Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology (NCCN Guidelines) to help health care systems in providing optimal care for patients with cancer with varying available resources. This framework is modified from a method developed by the Breast Health Global Initiative. The NCCN Framework for Resource Stratification (NCCN Framework) identifies 4 resource environments: basic resources, core resources, enhanced resources, and NCCN Guidelines, and presents the recommendations in a graphic format that always maintains the context of the NCCN Guidelines. This article describes the rationale for resource-stratified guidelines and the methodology for developing the NCCN Framework, using a portion of the NCCN Cervical Cancer Guideline as an example.

Full access

Thomas A. D’Amico, Lindsey A.M. Bandini, Alan Balch, Al B. Benson III, Stephen B. Edge, C. Lyn Fitzgerald, Robert J. Green, Wui-Jin Koh, Michael Kolodziej, Shaji Kumar, Neal J. Meropol, James L. Mohler, David Pfister, Ronald S. Walters, and Robert W. Carlson

Although oncology care has evolved, outcome assessment remains a key challenge. Outcome measurement requires identification and adoption of a succinct list of metrics indicative of high-quality cancer care for use within and across healthcare systems. NCCN established an advisory committee, the NCCN Quality and Outcomes Committee, consisting of provider experts from NCCN Member Institutions and other stakeholders, including payers and patient advocacy, community oncology, and health information technology representatives, to review the existing quality landscape and identify contemporary, relevant cancer quality and outcomes measures by reevaluating validated measures for endorsement and proposing new measure concepts to fill crucial gaps. This manuscript reports on 22 measures and concepts; 15 that align with existing measures and 7 that are new.

Full access

Wui-Jin Koh, Benjamin E. Greer, Nadeem R. Abu-Rustum, Sachin M. Apte, Susana M. Campos, John Chan, Kathleen R. Cho, David Cohn, Marta Ann Crispens, Nefertiti DuPont, Patricia J. Eifel, Amanda Nickles Fader, Christine M. Fisher, David K. Gaffney, Suzanne George, Ernest Han, Warner K. Huh, John R. Lurain III, Lainie Martin, David Mutch, Steven W. Remmenga, R. Kevin Reynolds, William Small Jr, Nelson Teng, Todd Tillmanns, Fidel A. Valea, Nicole McMillian, and Miranda Hughes

Adenocarcinoma of the endometrium (also known as endometrial cancer or more broadly as uterine cancer or carcinoma of the uterine corpus) is the most common malignancy of the female genital tract in the United States. An estimated 49,560 new uterine cancer cases will occur in 2013, with 8190 deaths resulting from the disease. Uterine sarcomas (stromal/mesenchymal tumors) are uncommon malignancies, accounting for approximately 3% of all uterine cancers. The NCCN Guidelines for Uterine Neoplasms describe malignant epithelial carcinomas and uterine sarcomas; each of these major categories contains specific histologic groups that require different management. This excerpt of these guidelines focuses on early-stage disease.

Full access

Wui-Jin Koh, Benjamin E. Greer, Nadeem R. Abu-Rustum, Sachin M. Apte, Susana M. Campos, John Chan, Kathleen R. Cho, David Cohn, Marta Ann Crispens, Nefertiti DuPont, Patricia J. Eifel, David K. Gaffney, Robert L. Giuntoli II, Ernest Han, Warner K. Huh, John R. Lurain III, Lainie Martin, Mark A. Morgan, David Mutch, Steven W. Remmenga, R. Kevin Reynolds, William Small Jr, Nelson Teng, Todd Tillmanns, Fidel A. Valea, Nicole R. McMillian, and Miranda Hughes

These NCCN Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology for Cervical Cancer focus on early-stage disease, because it occurs more frequently in the United States. After careful clinical evaluation and staging, the primary treatment of early-stage cervical cancer is either surgery or radiotherapy. These guidelines include fertility-sparing and non-fertility-sparing treatment for those with early-stage disease, which is disease confined to the uterus. A new fertility-sparing algorithm was added for select patients with stage IA and IB1 disease..

Full access

Benjamin E. Greer, Wui-Jin Koh, Nadeem R. Abu-Rustum, Sachin M. Apte, Susana M. Campos, John Chan, Kathleen R. Cho, Larry Copeland, Marta Ann Crispens, Nefertiti DuPont, Patricia J. Eifel, David K. Gaffney, Warner K. Huh, Daniel S. Kapp, John R. Lurain III, Lainie Martin, Mark A. Morgan, Robert J. Morgan Jr., David Mutch, Steven W. Remmenga, R. Kevin Reynolds, William Small Jr., Nelson Teng, and Fidel A. Valea

Full access

Benjamin E. Greer, Wui-Jin Koh, Nadeem Abu-Rustum, Michael A. Bookman, Robert E. Bristow, Susana M. Campos, Kathleen R. Cho, Larry Copeland, Marta Ann Crispens, Patricia J. Eifel, Warner K. Huh, Wainwright Jaggernauth, Daniel S. Kapp, John J. Kavanagh, John R. Lurain III, Mark Morgan, Robert J. Morgan Jr, C. Bethan Powell, Steven W. Remmenga, R. Kevin Reynolds, Angeles Alvarez Secord, William Small Jr, and Nelson Teng