Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 22 items for

  • Author: William J. Gradishar x
Clear All Modify Search
Full access

William J. Gradishar

The treatment of HER2-positive breast cancer has benefited from a number of targeted agents. Although adjuvant trastuzumab has dramatically reduced progression—making metastatic disease far less common today—newer treatment advances are also impacting this disease. Dual targeting with pertuzumab and trastuzumab can extend the survival of metastatic disease by more 16 months, but despite such success, resistance to HER2 targeting remains a challenge. Drugs in the pipeline, such as neratinib, may help meet this therapeutic demand. In addition to anti-HER2 agents, chemotherapy is beneficial to patients with tumors 1 cm or larger, but the optimal treatment of smaller tumors is still a work in progress.

Full access

William J. Gradishar

The management of advanced hormone receptor–positive disease has evolved with the emergence of CDK4/6 inhibitors. Improvements in progression-free survival of approximately 10 months were noted in pivotal trials of palbociclib. Strong efficacy was also seen with ribociclib, which was recently approved by the FDA. In the adjuvant treatment setting of hormone receptor–positive disease, an important issue for consideration is the duration of endocrine therapy.

Full access

William J. Gradishar

Many newer agents in combination are being studied in the front-line treatment of women with HER2-positive metastatic breast cancer (MBC), but the story in the endocrine arena is more about the wise use of new strategies to overcome endocrine resistance, because no new antihormonal agents have been approved in the past decade. During his presentation at the NCCN 19th Annual Conference, Dr. William Gradishar explored what’s new in the treatment of MBC, focusing primarily on enhancing the effect of endocrine therapy to overcome resistance with newer targeted agents such as everolimus, reevaluating the role of rebiopsy on disease progression and measuring circulating tumor cells as a surrogate of response to treatment, and reviewing the effective treatment regimens for HER2-positive disease.

Full access

Mary Cianfrocca and William J. Gradishar

The question of combination versus single-agent chemotherapy in the setting of metastatic breast cancer (MBC) is an often-debated issue. Many single agents have activity in this setting and the potential for significant synergism between chemotherapy agents has led to many combination chemotherapy trials. This article defends the position that combination chemotherapy is the optimal approach for patients with MBC.

Full access

Virginia G. Kaklamani and William J. Gradishar

Full access

Melinda L. Telli, William J. Gradishar and John H. Ward

Advances in molecular testing have ushered in the new era of precision medicine. The 2018 publication of the TAILORx trial helped refine the use of genetic expression assays, specifically the 21-gene recurrence score, in assigning patients to endocrine therapy alone or with chemotherapy. The NCCN Guidelines for Breast Cancer explore the clinical applications of this study. The algorithm for managing the axilla in early breast cancer has been further refined, based on the presence or absence of clinical evidence of lymph node involvement. Ovarian suppression has been validated as the optimal approach in higher risk premenopausal women, based on updated analysis of the SOFT and TEXT pivotal trials. In the metastatic setting, the NCCN Guidelines further reinforce the benefit of the CDK4/6 inhibitors, extending the “preferred” recommendation to all the available agents in metastatic disease. Options in triple-negative breast cancer now include, for the first time, an immunotherapeutic agent.

Full access

Sharon H. Giordano, Anthony D. Elias and William J. Gradishar

The emergence of CDK4/6 inhibitors has changed the treatment algorithm for advanced/metastatic estrogen receptor–positive breast cancer. In pivotal trials of palbociclib, ribociclib, and abemaciclib, doubling in progression-free survival has been seen. All 3 agents in this class are now included in the NCCN Guidelines for Breast Cancer, and clinicians should be incorporating these agents into their treatment algorithms. The other important issue in this breast cancer setting is extended duration of endocrine therapy. Most of the benefit is modest and toxicity is an issue; therefore, extended-duration endocrine therapy should be highly individualized. For triple-negative disease, platinum agents and PARP inhibitors are helping some patients, but immunotherapies and other novel classes of drugs now in development hold the promise of even better outcomes. In HER2-positive early-stage disease, dual HER2 blockade is of modest benefit, and extended treatment with neratinib may be a good option for some high-risk patients.

Full access

Lauren Nye, Timothy K. Huyck and William J. Gradishar

Breast cancer is the most common malignancy associated with pregnancy and is a rare but well-recognized complication. It is hypothesized that as more women continue to delay childbearing, the incidence of breast cancer in pregnancy will increase. Because of the lack of clinical experience with breast cancer in the setting of pregnancy, given its relative infrequency, many patients and physicians believe the diagnosis puts the life of the mother at odds with that of the fetus, but available data suggest that termination of the pregnancy does not improve the outcome for pregnant women with breast cancer. Often diagnosis is delayed because neither patient nor physician suspects malignancy. This report presents a recent case of a young primigravid woman with a newly appreciated breast mass seen at Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine as a means of discussing diagnostic considerations, therapeutic options, and supportive care available to the practitioner when managing a pregnant patient with breast cancer.

Full access

Robert W. Carlson, D. Craig Allred, Benjamin O. Anderson, Harold J. Burstein, W. Bradford Carter, Stephen B. Edge, John K. Erban, William B. Farrar, Andres Forero, Sharon Hermes Giordano, Lori J. Goldstein, William J. Gradishar, Daniel F. Hayes, Clifford A. Hudis, Britt-Marie Ljung, P. Kelly Marcom, Ingrid A. Mayer, Beryl McCormick, Lori J. Pierce, Elizabeth C. Reed, Mary Lou Smith, George Somlo, Neal S. Topham, John H. Ward, Eric P. Winer and Antonio C. Wolff

Overview The NCCN Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology (NCCN Guidelines) for Breast Cancer: Noninvasive and Special Situations presented here are the work of the NCCN Breast Cancer panel members. Categories of evidence and consensus were assessed and are noted in the algorithms and text. Although not explicitly stated at every decision point of the guidelines, patient participation in prospective clinical trials is the preferred option of treatment for all stages of breast cancer. These NCCN Guidelines focus on noninvasive breast cancer and special situations, such as Paget's disease, phyllodes tumor, breast cancer during pregnancy, and axillary breast cancer. Another NCCN guideline addresses invasive breast cancer (see NCCN Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology [NCCN Guidelines] for Breast Cancer: Invasive and Inflammatory; to view the complete and most recent version of these guidelines, visit the NCCN Web site at www.NCCN.org). The American Cancer Society estimates that 194,280 new cases of invasive breast cancer were diagnosed and 40,610 died of the disease in the United States in 2009.1 In addition, approximately 62,280 women were diagnosed with carcinoma in situ of the breast during the same year. Breast cancer is the most common malignancy in women in the United States and is second only to lung cancer as a cause of cancer death. The incidence of breast cancer has increased steadily in the United States over the past few decades, but breast cancer mortality seems to be declining,1,2 suggesting a benefit from early detection and more effective treatment. The origin of most breast cancer...
Full access

Robert W. Carlson, D. Craig Allred, Benjamin O. Anderson, Harold J. Burstein, W. Bradford Carter, Stephen B. Edge, John K. Erban, William B. Farrar, Lori J. Goldstein, William J. Gradishar, Daniel F. Hayes, Clifford A. Hudis, Mohammad Jahanzeb, Krystyna Kiel, Britt-Marie Ljung, P. Kelly Marcom, Ingrid A. Mayer, Beryl McCormick, Lisle M. Nabell, Lori J. Pierce, Elizabeth C. Reed, Mary Lou Smith, George Somlo, Richard L. Theriault, Neal S. Topham, John H. Ward, Eric P. Winer and Antonio C. Wolff

Breast Cancer Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology NCCN Categories of Evidence and Consensus Category 1: The recommendation is based on high-level evidence (e.g., randomized controlled trials) and there is uniform NCCN consensus. Category 2A: The recommendation is based on lower-level evidence and there is uniform NCCN consensus. Category 2B: The recommendation is based on lower-level evidence and there is nonuniform NCCN consensus (but no major disagreement). Category 3: The recommendation is based on any level of evidence but reflects major disagreement. All recommendations are category 2A unless otherwise noted. The Breast Cancer Clinical Practice Guidelines presented here are the work of the members of the NCCN Breast Cancer Clinical Practice Guidelines Panel. Categories of evidence were assessed and are noted on the algorithms and in the text. Although not explicitly stated at every decision point of the Guidelines, patient participation in prospective clinical trials is the preferred option of treatment for all stages of breast cancer. The full breast cancer guidelines are not printed in this issue of JNCCN, but can be accessed online at www.nccn.org. Clinical trials: The NCCN believes that the best management for any cancer patient is in a clinical trial. Participation in clinical trials is especially encouraged. Overview The American Cancer Society estimated that 184,450 new cases of invasive breast cancer would be diagnosed and 40,930 patients would die of the disease in the United States in 2008.1 In addition, approximately 67,770 women will be diagnosed with carcinoma in situ of the breast during the same...