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Vinod Ravi, Eric M. Sanford, Wei-Lien Wang, Jeffrey S. Ross, Naveen Ramesh, Andrew Futreal, Shreyaskumar Patel, Phillip J. Stephens, Vincent A. Miller and Siraj M. Ali

Background: Angiosarcoma is a malignant neoplastic disease originating from or differentiating toward vascular endothelium, for which systemic pharmacologic treatment has limited durability. The molecular oncogenesis of angiosarcoma is often linked to inappropriate activations of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor (VEGFR) family members, which presents an opportunity for the use of therapy that selectively targets the machinery of vascular signaling. Methods: Hybridization capture of 3,320 exons of 182 cancer-related genes and the introns of 14 genes frequently rearranged in cancer was applied to more than 50 ng of DNA extracted from a formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded biopsy of recurrent angiosarcoma and was sequenced to high, uniform coverage of 939x. Results: The angiosarcoma harbored amplifications of VEGFR2 (KDR) of 8 copies and VEGFR3 (FLT4) of 16 copies. The patient was initially treated with sorafenib, an inhibitor of VEGFR2, and developed progressive disease. The patient then received pazopanib, an inhibitor of VEGFR2 and VEGFR3 and experienced a potent antitumor response resulting in clinically stable disease for 6 months. Conclusions: This exceptional response to pazopanib treatment suggests that a subset of patients with angiosarcoma with genomic alterations in vascular signaling genes may respond well to pazopanib.

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Sanam Loghavi, Mark J. Routbort, Keyur P. Patel, Rajyalakshmi Luthra, Wei-Lien Wang, Russell R. Broaddus, Michael A. Davies and Alexander J. Lazar

Understanding of the genetic basis and molecular pathogenesis of cancer has evolved substantially over the past century. The advent of high-throughput gene sequencing methods has unraveled hundreds of recurrent somatic genetic alterations in various malignancies, either causative or harboring major prognostic and/or predictive implications. Knowledge of these specific changes has dramatically altered diagnostic and therapeutic approaches to cancer, enabling personalized molecular therapies. This article shares approaches to adopting and fine-tuning the practice of molecular diagnostics as an essential component of diagnostic pathology in a tertiary care cancer hospital and proposes methods by which genetic testing in cancer can become standard of care in pathology departments across the nation.