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Jerald P. Radich and Vivian Oehler

Tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) are now standard up-front therapy for chronic myeloid leukemia (CML). Patients with newly diagnosed chronic-phase CML treated with the TKI imatinib mesylate typically experience a complete cytogenetic remission. Outcomes for patients with advanced-phase disease are distinctly worse. Unfortunately, a small proportion of chronic-phase patients experience relapse during this therapy, and most with advanced-phase disease develop resistance to imatinib mesylate after months of therapy. Hematopoietic cell transplantation remains the only curative approach for CML and can salvage patients with advanced-phase disease. Therefore, physicians must carefully monitor patients with chronic-phase CML treated with TKIs so that they can undergo hematopoietic cell transplant (or treatment with another TKI or experimental therapy) before frank progression occurs. Fortunately, monitoring CML using cytogenetic and molecular methods (i.e., quantitative polymerase chain reaction) effectively defines end points that correlate highly with outcome.

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Jason Gotlib, Aaron T. Gerds, Prithviraj Bose, Mariana C. Castells, Michael W. Deininger, Ivana Gojo, Krishna Gundabolu, Gabriela Hobbs, Catriona Jamieson, Brandon McMahon, Sanjay R. Mohan, Vivian Oehler, Stephen Oh, Eric Padron, Philip Pancari, Nikolaos Papadantonakis, Animesh Pardanani, Nikolai Podoltsev, Raajit Rampal, Erik Ranheim, Lindsay Rein, David S. Snyder, Brady L. Stein, Moshe Talpaz, Swapna Thota, Martha Wadleigh, Katherine Walsh, Mary Anne Bergman and Hema Sundar

Mastocytosis is a group of heterogeneous disorders resulting from the clonal proliferation of abnormal mast cells and their accumulation in the skin and/or in various extracutaneous organs. Systemic mastocytosis is the most common form of mastocytosis diagnosed in adults, characterized by mast cell infiltration of one or more extracutaneous organs (with or without skin involvement). The identification of KIT D816V mutation and the emergence of novel targeted therapies have significantly improved the diagnosis and treatment of systemic mastocytosis. However, certain aspects of clinical care, particularly the diagnosis, assessment, and management of mediator-related symptoms continue to present challenges. This manuscript discusses the recommendations outlined in the NCCN Guidelines for the diagnosis and management of patients with systemic mastocytosis.

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Aaron T. Gerds, Jason Gotlib, Prithviraj Bose, Michael W. Deininger, Andrew Dunbar, Amro Elshoury, Tracy I. George, Ivana Gojo, Krishna Gundabolu, Elizabeth Hexner, Gabriela Hobbs, Tania Jain, Catriona Jamieson, Andrew T. Kuykendall, Brandon McMahon, Sanjay R. Mohan, Vivian Oehler, Stephen Oh, Animesh Pardanani, Nikolai Podoltsev, Erik Ranheim, Lindsay Rein, Rachel Salit, David S. Snyder, Brady L. Stein, Moshe Talpaz, Swapna Thota, Pankit Vachhani, Martha Wadleigh, Katherine Walsh, Dawn C. Ward, Mary Anne Bergman and Hema Sundar

Eosinophilic disorders and related syndromes represent a heterogeneous group of neoplastic and nonneoplastic conditions, characterized by more eosinophils in the peripheral blood, and may involve eosinophil-induced organ damage. In the WHO classification of myeloid and lymphoid neoplasms, eosinophilic disorders characterized by dysregulated tyrosine kinase (TK) fusion genes are recognized as a new category termed, myeloid/lymphoid neoplasms with eosinophilia and rearrangement of PDGFRA, PDGFRB or FGFR1 or with PCM1-JAK2. In addition to these aforementioned TK fusion genes, rearrangements involving FLT3 and ABL1 genes have also been described. These new NCCN Guidelines include recommendations for the diagnosis, staging, and treatment of any one of the myeloid/lymphoid neoplasms with eosinophilia (MLN-Eo) and a TK fusion gene included in the 2017 WHO Classification, as well as MLN-Eo and a FLT3 or ABL1 rearrangement.