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Robert J. Motzer, Neeraj Agarwal, Clair Beard, Sam Bhayani, Graeme B. Bolger, Michael A. Carducci, Sam S. Chang, Toni K. Choueiri, Steven L. Hancock, Gary R. Hudes, Eric Jonasch, David Josephson, Timothy M. Kuzel, Ellis G. Levine, Daniel W. Lin, Kim A. Margolin, M. Dror Michaelson, Thomas Olencki, Roberto Pili, Thomas W. Ratliff, Bruce G. Redman, Cary N. Robertson, Charles J. Ryan, Joel Sheinfeld, Philippe E. Spiess, Jue Wang and Richard B. Wilder

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Robert J. Motzer, Neeraj Agarwal, Clair Beard, Sam Bhayani, Graeme B. Bolger, Mark K. Buyyounouski, Michael A. Carducci, Sam S. Chang, Toni K. Choueiri, Shilpa Gupta, Steven L. Hancock, Gary R. Hudes, Eric Jonasch, Timothy M. Kuzel, Clayton Lau, Ellis G. Levine, Daniel W. Lin, Kim A. Margolin, M. Dror Michaelson, Thomas Olencki, Roberto Pili, Thomas W. Ratliff, Bruce G. Redman, Cary N. Robertson, Charles J. Ryan, Joel Sheinfeld, Jue Wang and Richard B. Wilder

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Robert I. Haddad, William M. Lydiatt, Douglas W. Ball, Naifa Lamki Busaidy, David Byrd, Glenda Callender, Paxton Dickson, Quan-Yang Duh, Hormoz Ehya, Megan Haymart, Carl Hoh, Jason P. Hunt, Andrei Iagaru, Fouad Kandeel, Peter Kopp, Dominick M. Lamonica, Judith C. McCaffrey, Jeffrey F. Moley, Lee Parks, Christopher D. Raeburn, John A. Ridge, Matthew D. Ringel, Randall P. Scheri, Jatin P. Shah, Robert C. Smallridge, Cord Sturgeon, Thomas N. Wang, Lori J. Wirth, Karin G. Hoffmann and Miranda Hughes

This selection from the NCCN Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology (NCCN Guidelines) for Thyroid Carcinoma focuses on anaplastic carcinoma because substantial changes were made to the systemic therapy recommendations for the 2015 update. Dosages and frequency of administration are now provided, docetaxel/doxorubicin regimens were added, and single-agent cisplatin was deleted because it is not recommended for patients with advanced or metastatic anaplastic thyroid cancer.

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Robert J. Motzer, Neeraj Agarwal, Clair Beard, Graeme B. Bolger, Barry Boston, Michael A. Carducci, Toni K. Choueiri, Robert A. Figlin, Mayer Fishman, Steven L. Hancock, Gary R. Hudes, Eric Jonasch, Anne Kessinger, Timothy M. Kuzel, Paul H. Lange, Ellis G. Levine, Kim A. Margolin, M. Dror Michaelson, Thomas Olencki, Roberto Pili, Bruce G. Redman, Cary N. Robertson, Lawrence H. Schwartz, Joel Sheinfeld and Jue Wang

Kidney Cancer Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology NCCN Categories of Evidence and Consensus Category 1: The recommendation is based on high-level evidence (e.g., randomized controlled trials) and there isuniform NCCN consensus. Category 2A: The recommendation is based on lower-level evidence and there is uniform NCCN consensus. Category 2B: The recommendation is based on lower-level evidence and there is nonuniform NCCN consensus (but no major disagreement). Category 3: The recommendation is based on any level of evidence but reflects major disagreement. All recommendations are category 2A unless otherwise noted. Clinical trials: The NCCN believes that the best management for any cancer patient is in a clinical trial. Participation in clinical trials is especially encouraged. Overview In 2008, an estimated 54,390 Americans were diagnosed with kidney cancer and 13,010 died of the disease in the United States.1 Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) comprises approximately 2% of all malignancies, with a median age at diagnosis of 65 years. The rate of RCC has increased 2% per year for the past 65 years. The reason for this increase is unknown. Approximately 90% of renal tumors are RCC, and 85% of these are clear cell tumors.2 Other, less-common cell types include papillary, chromophobe, and Bellini (collecting) duct tumors. Collecting duct carcinoma comprises fewer than 1% of all cases. Medullary renal carcinoma is a variant of collecting duct renal carcinoma and was initially described as occurring in patients who are sickle cell–trait positive. Smoking and obesity are among the risk factors for RCC development. Several hereditary types...
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Robert J. Motzer, Neeraj Agarwal, Clair Beard, Graeme B. Bolger, Barry Boston, Michael A. Carducci, Toni K. Choueiri, Robert A. Figlin, Mayer Fishman, Steven L. Hancock, Gary R. Hudes, Eric Jonasch, Anne Kessinger, Timothy M. Kuzel, Paul H. Lange, Ellis G. Levine, Kim A. Margolin, M. Dror Michaelson, Thomas Olencki, Roberto Pili, Bruce G. Redman, Cary N. Robertson, Lawrence H. Schwartz, Joel Sheinfeld and Jue Wang

Testicular Cancer Clinical Practice Guidelines in OncologyNCCN Categories of Evidence and ConsensusCategory 1: The recommendation is based on high-level evidence (e.g., randomized controlled trials) and there is uniform NCCN consensus.Category 2A: The recommendation is based on lower-level evidence and there is uniform NCCN consensus.Category 2B: The recommendation is based on lower-level evidence and there is nonuniform NCCN consensus (but no major disagreement).Category 3: The recommendation is based on any level of evidence but reflects major disagreement.All recommendations are category 2A unless otherwise noted.Clinical trials: The NCCN believes that the best management for any cancer patient is in a clinical trial. Participation in clinical trials is especially encouraged.OverviewAn estimated 8090 new cases of testicular cancer will be diagnosed in the United States in 2008.1 Germ cell tumors (GCTs) comprise 95% of malignant tumors arising in the testes. These tumors also occur occasionally in extragonadal primary sites, but they are still managed the same as testicular GCTs. Although GCTs are relatively uncommon tumors that comprise only 2% of all human malignancies, they constitute the most common solid tumor in men between the ages of 15 and 34 years. In addition, the worldwide incidence of these tumors has more than doubled in the past 40 years.Several risk factors for GCT development have been identified, including prior history, positive family history, cryptorchidism, testicular dysgenesis, and Klinefelter's syndrome. GCTs are classified as seminoma or nonseminoma. Nonseminomatous tumors often include multiple cell types, including embryonal cell...
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R. Michael Tuttle, Douglas W. Ball, David Byrd, Gilbert H. Daniels, Raza A. Dilawari, Gerard M. Doherty, Quan-Yang Duh, Hormoz Ehya, William B. Farrar, Robert I. Haddad, Fouad Kandeel, Richard T. Kloos, Peter Kopp, Dominick M. Lamonica, Thom R. Loree, William M. Lydiatt, Judith McCaffrey, John A. Olson Jr., Lee Parks, John A. Ridge, Jatin P. Shah, Steven I. Sherman, Cord Sturgeon, Steven G. Waguespack, Thomas N. Wang and Lori J. Wirth

Overview There are 3 main histologic types of thyroid carcinoma: differentiated (including papillary, follicular, and Hürthle), medullary, and anaplastic (aggressive undifferentiated tumor). Of 53,856 patients treated for thyroid carcinoma between 1985 and 1995, 80% had papillary, 11% had follicular, 3% had Hürthle cell, 4% had medullary, and 2% had anaplastic thyroid carcinoma.1 These NCCN guidelines focus on medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC). Another NCCN guideline addresses papillary, follicular, Hürthle cell, and anaplastic thyroid carcinomas (see NCCN Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology: Thyroid Carcinoma [to view the most recent version of these guidelines, visit the NCCN Web site at www.NCCN.org]). MTC derives from the neuroendocrine parafollicular calcitonin-producing (C) cells of the thyroid.2–4 Sporadic MTC accounts for approximately 80% of all cases of the disease. The remaining cases consist of inherited tumor syndromes, such as multiple endocrine neoplasia type 2A (MEN 2A), which is the most common type; MEN 2B; or familial MTC.5,6 Sporadic disease typically presents in the fifth or sixth decade. Familial forms of the disease tend to present at earlier ages.2 Because the C cells are predominantly located in the upper portion of each thyroid lobe, patients with sporadic disease typically present with upper pole thyroid nodules. Metastatic cervical adenopathy appears in approximately 50% of patients at initial presentation. Symptoms of upper aerodigestive tract compression or invasion are reported by up to 15% of patients with sporadic disease.7 Symptoms from distant metastases in the lungs or bones occur in 5% to 10% of patients. The ability of the tumor to...
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R. Michael Tuttle, Douglas W. Ball, David Byrd, Raza A. Dilawari, Gerard M. Doherty, Quan-Yang Duh, Hormoz Ehya, William B. Farrar, Robert I. Haddad, Fouad Kandeel, Richard T. Kloos, Peter Kopp, Dominick M. Lamonica, Thom R. Loree, William M. Lydiatt, Judith C. McCaffrey, John A. Olson Jr., Lee Parks, John A. Ridge, Jatin P. Shah, Steven I. Sherman, Cord Sturgeon, Steven G. Waguespack, Thomas N. Wang and Lori J. Wirth

OverviewEpidemiologyThyroid nodules are approximately 4 times more common in women than in men. Palpable nodules increase in frequency throughout life, reaching a prevalence of approximately 5% in the United States population aged 50 years and older.1–3 Nodules are even more prevalent when the thyroid gland is examined at autopsy or surgery, or when using ultrasonography, and 50% of these have nodules, which are almost always benign.2,4 New nodules develop at a rate of approximately 0.1% per year beginning in early life, but at a much higher rate (∼2% per year) after exposure to head and neck irradiation.5,6By contrast, thyroid carcinoma is uncommon. For the United States population, the lifetime risk of being diagnosed with thyroid carcinoma is less than 1% (0.83% for women and 0.33% for men).7 Approximately 37,200 new cases of thyroid carcinoma were diagnosed in the United States in 2009.8As with thyroid nodules, thyroid carcinoma occurs 2 to 3 times more often in women than in men. With the incidence increasing by 6.2% per year, thyroid carcinoma is currently the sixth most common malignancy diagnosed in women.8 Among persons age 15 to 24 years, thyroid carcinoma accounts for 7.5% to 10% of all diagnosed malignancies.9–11 The disease is also diagnosed more often in white North Americans than in African Americans. Although thyroid carcinoma can occur at any age, the peak incidence from 2004 to 2006 was near age 45 to 49 years in women and 65 to 69 years in men.7Thyroid carcinoma has...
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R. Michael Tuttle, Robert I. Haddad, Douglas W. Ball, David Byrd, Paxton Dickson, Quan-Yang Duh, Hormoz Ehya, Megan Haymart, Carl Hoh, Jason P. Hunt, Andrei Iagaru, Fouad Kandeel, Peter Kopp, Dominick M. Lamonica, William M. Lydiatt, Judith McCaffrey, Jeffrey F. Moley, Lee Parks, Christopher D. Raeburn, John A. Ridge, Matthew D. Ringel, Randall P. Scheri, Jatin P. Shah, Steven I. Sherman, Cord Sturgeon, Steven G. Waguespack, Thomas N. Wang, Lori J. Wirth, Karin G. Hoffmann and Miranda Hughes

These NCCN Guidelines Insights focus on some of the major updates to the 2014 NCCN Guidelines for Thyroid Carcinoma. Kinase inhibitor therapy may be used to treat thyroid carcinoma that is symptomatic and/or progressive and not amenable to treatment with radioactive iodine. Sorafenib may be considered for select patients with metastatic differentiated thyroid carcinoma, whereas vandetanib or cabozantinib may be recommended for select patients with metastatic medullary thyroid carcinoma. Other kinase inhibitors may be considered for select patients with either type of thyroid carcinoma. A new section on “Principles of Kinase Inhibitor Therapy in Advanced Thyroid Cancer” was added to the NCCN Guidelines to assist with using these novel targeted agents.

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Robert J. Motzer, Eric Jonasch, Neeraj Agarwal, Clair Beard, Sam Bhayani, Graeme B. Bolger, Sam S. Chang, Toni K. Choueiri, Ithaar H. Derweesh, Shilpa Gupta, Steven L. Hancock, Jenny J. Kim, Timothy M. Kuzel, Elaine T. Lam, Clayton Lau, Ellis G. Levine, Daniel W. Lin, Kim A. Margolin, M. Dror Michaelson, Thomas Olencki, Roberto Pili, Elizabeth R. Plimack, Edward N. Rampersaud, Bruce G. Redman, Charles J. Ryan, Joel Sheinfeld, Kanishka Sircar, Brad Somer, Jue Wang, Richard B. Wilder, Mary A. Dwyer and Rashmi Kumar

These NCCN Guidelines Insights highlight treatment recommendations and updates specific to the management of patients with advanced non-clear cell carcinoma included in the 2014 version of the NCCN Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology for Kidney Cancer.

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Robert I. Haddad, Christian Nasr, Lindsay Bischoff, Naifa Lamki Busaidy, David Byrd, Glenda Callender, Paxton Dickson, Quan-Yang Duh, Hormoz Ehya, Whitney Goldner, Megan Haymart, Carl Hoh, Jason P. Hunt, Andrei Iagaru, Fouad Kandeel, Peter Kopp, Dominick M. Lamonica, Bryan McIver, Christopher D. Raeburn, John A. Ridge, Matthew D. Ringel, Randall P. Scheri, Jatin P. Shah, Rebecca Sippel, Robert C. Smallridge, Cord Sturgeon, Thomas N. Wang, Lori J. Wirth, Richard J. Wong, Alyse Johnson-Chilla, Karin G. Hoffmann and Lisa A. Gurski

The NCCN Guidelines for Thyroid Carcinoma provide recommendations for the management of different types of thyroid carcinoma, including papillary, follicular, Hürthle cell, medullary, and anaplastic carcinomas. These NCCN Guidelines Insights summarize the panel discussion behind recent updates to the guidelines, including the expanding role of molecular testing for differentiated thyroid carcinoma, implications of the new pathologic diagnosis of noninvasive follicular thyroid neoplasm with papillary-like nuclear features, and the addition of a new targeted therapy option for BRAF V600E–mutated anaplastic thyroid carcinoma.