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The UNMC Eppley Cancer Center at The Nebraska Medical Center

An estimated 8250 new cases of testicular cancer will be diagnosed in the United States in 2006, with germ cell tumors (GCTs) constituting 95% of the malignant tumors arising in the testes. Although GCTs are relatively uncommon tumors, they are the most common solid tumor in men between the ages of 15 and 34 years. The worldwide incidence of these tumors has more than doubled in the past 40 years. More than 90% of all patients diagnosed with GCTs are cured, including 70% to 80% of patients with advanced tumors who are treated with chemotherapy. Standard therapy has been established at essentially all stages of management and must be closely followed to ensure the potential for cure.

For the most recent version of the guidelines, please visit NCCN.org

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The UNMC Eppley Cancer Center at The Nebraska Medical Center

An estimated 38,890 Americans will be diagnosed with kidney cancer and 12,840 will die of this disease in the United States in 2006. Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) constitutes approximately 2% of all malignancies, with a median age at diagnosis of 65 years. Smoking and obesity are among the risk factors for RCC development, and tumor grade, local extent of the tumor, presence of regional nodal metastases, and evidence of metastatic disease at presentation are the most important prognostic determinants of 5-year survival. These guidelines discuss evaluation, staging, treatment, and management after treatment.

For the most recent version of the guidelines, please visit NCCN.org

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The UNMC Eppley Cancer Center at The Nebraska Medical Center

An estimated 61,420 new cases of urinary bladder cancer will be diagnosed in the United States in 2006, making it the fourth most common cancer in men and the ninth most common neoplasm in women. Because the median age of diagnosis is 65 years, medical comorbidities are a frequent consideration. The clinical spectrum of bladder cancer can be divided into 3 categories: noninvasive tumors, invasive lesions, and metastatic lesions. These categories differ in prognosis, management, and therapeutic goals, and these guidelines discuss management strategies to achieve the best possible outcomes.

For the most recent version of the guidelines, please visit NCCN.org

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The UNMC Eppley Cancer Center at The Nebraska Medical Center

Upper gastrointestinal (GI) tract cancers originating in the esophagus, gastroesophageal (GE) junctions, and stomach constitute a major health problem worldwide; esophageal cancer is the eighth most common cancer worldwide. An estimated 16,470 new cases of and 14,280 deaths from esophageal cancer will occur in the United States in 2008. Risk factors associated with development of esophageal cancer include age, male gender, Caucasian race, high body mass index, Barrett's esophagus, and history of gastroesophageal reflux disease. Important updates for the 2009 guidelines include a new page on “Principles of Best Supportive Care” that gives specific recommendations for esophageal cancer best supportive care throughout the guidelines.

To view the NCCN Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology on Gastric Cancers, please visit the NCCN Web site at www.nccn.org.

For the most recent version of the guidelines, please visit NCCN.org

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The UNMC Eppley Cancer Center at The Nebraska Medical Center

Myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) represent myeloid clonal hemopathies with relatively heterogeneous spectrums of presentation. The major clinical problems in these disorders are morbidities caused by patients' cytopenias and the potential for MDS to evolve into acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Managing MDS is complicated by the generally advanced age of patients, attendant non-hematologic comorbidities, and older patients' relative inability to tolerate some therapies. In addition, when the illness progresses into AML, these patients experience lower response rates to standard therapy than patients with de novo AML. Important changes from the 2008 version of the guidelines include the addition of lenalidomide as a possible treatment for symptomatically anemic non-del(5q) patients whose anemia does not respond to initial therapy.

For the most recent version of the guidelines, please visit NCCN.org