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  • Author: Stephen Hamilton x
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Silviya K. Meletath, Dean Pavlick, Tim Brennan, Roy Hamilton, Juliann Chmielecki, Julia A. Elvin, Norma Palma, Jeffrey S. Ross, Vincent A. Miller, Philip J. Stephens, George Snipes, Veena Rajaram, Siraj M. Ali and Isaac Melguizo-Gavilanes

Background: Gangliogliomas are slow-growing, low-grade central nervous system tumors affecting children and young adults. However, some patients will experience tumor recurrence and/or malignant progression. This article reports on the clinical history, molecular findings, and treatment response in a patient with BRAF V600–mutated high-grade glioma arising from ganglioglioma. Methods: Hematoxylin-eosin staining and comprehensive genomic profiling via Foundation One were performed on the tumor sample from a male patient undergoing treatment at the Department of Neuro-Oncology at Baylor University Medical Center. Results: The patient was eligible for participation in a clinical trial (ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT00916409) of a tumor treatment fields (TTFields) device, NovoTTF-100A, with concurrent radiation and chemotherapy (CCRT). His disease relapsed 4 months after completion of his CCRT, with MRI showing areas of enhancement. Temozolomide was discontinued and he was offered dabrafenib, an oral selective inhibitor of BRAF V600E, with continued use of NovoTTF. At the time of this report, after 2 years of treatment with dabrafenib and TTFields, the patient shows a durable complete response in all areas with no active lesions or new areas of enhancement. Conclusions: This report suggests that TTFields delivered in combination with targeted therapy dabrafenib yielded a remarkable clinical and radiologic response in this recurrent high-grade glioma. Targeted therapy matched to genomic alterations combined with TTFields treatment could provide clinical benefit and should be prospectively explored in the near future.

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Randall W. Burt, James S. Barthel, Kelli Bullard Dunn, Donald S. David, Ernesto Drelichman, James M. Ford, Francis M. Giardiello, Stephen B. Gruber, Amy L. Halverson, Stanley R. Hamilton, Mohammad K. Ismail, Kory Jasperson, Audrey J. Lazenby, Patrick M. Lynch, Edward W. Martin Jr., Robert J. Mayer, Reid M. Ness, Dawn Provenzale, M. Sambasiva Rao, Moshe Shike, Gideon Steinbach, Jonathan P. Terdiman and David Weinberg

Overview Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third most frequently diagnosed cancer in men and women in the United States. In 2009, an estimated 106,100 new cases of colon cancer and 40,870 new cases of rectal cancer will occur in the United States, and 49,920 people will die of colon and rectal cancers. Patients with lo-calized colon cancer have a 90% 5-year survival rate. CRC mortality can be reduced through early diagnosis and cancer prevention with polypectomy. Therefore, the goal of CRC screening is to detect cancer at an early, curable stage and to detect and remove clinically significant adenomas. Screening tests that can detect both early cancer and adenomatous polyps are encouraged, although the panel recognizes that patient preference and resource accessibility play a large role in test selection. Curent technology falls into 2 broad categories: structural and stool/fecal-based tests. Although some techniques are better established than others, panelists agreed that any screening is better than none. Structural Screening Tests Structural tests are able to detect both early cancer and adenomatous polyps using endoscopic or radiologic imaging. These have several limitations, including their relative invasiveness, the need for dietary preparation and bowel cleansing, and the time dedicated to the examination (typically a day). Endoscopic examinations require informed consent and sedation, and have related risks, including perforation and bleeding. Recently, a large cohort study of 53,220 Medicare patients between ages 66 and 95 years showed that risk for adverse events after colonoscopy increases with age. Colonoscopy Colonoscopy is the most complete...