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Stanford Hospital and Clinics

Neuroendocrine tumors are relatively rare. An estimated 25,690 new cases of thyroid cancer will be diagnosed in the United States in 2005, accounting for approximately 1% of all malignancies. Neuroendocrine tumors can be broadly subdivided into tumors that are benign or malignant, functional (i.e., producing a syndrome of hormonal excess) or nonfunctional. The management of neuroendocrine tumors with surgical, medical, or radiation therapies is determined by the specific endocrine glands involved, aggressiveness and stage of the tumor, hormonal concentrations detected, and specific patient needs. These guidelines have been designed to address scenarios presented by 80% of patients and to avoid scenarios relevant to less than 5% of patients.

For the most recent version of the guidelines, please visit NCCN.org

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Stanford Hospital and Clinics

Recent advances in molecular genetics have identified several genes associated with inherited susceptibility to cancer and have provided a means to begin identifying individuals and families with an increased risk of cancer. This rapid expansion of knowledge about cancer genetics has implications for all aspects of cancer management, including prevention, screening, and treatment. These guidelines specifically address hereditary breast/ovarian cancer syndrome (HBOC), Li-Fraumeni syndrome, and Cowden syndrome. These guidelines were developed understanding that much of our knowledge of how the rapidly emerging field of molecular genetics can be applied clinically is preliminary and that flexibility is needed when applying these guidelines to individual families.

For the most recent version of the guidelines, please visit NCCN.org