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Cancer-Related Fatigue

St. Jude Children's Research Hospital

Fatigue is a common symptom in patients with cancer and is nearly universal in those undergoing cytotoxic chemotherapy, radiation therapy, bone marrow transplantation, or treatment with biologic response modifiers. The problem, which affects 70% to 100% of cancer patients, has been exacerbated by the increased use of fatigue-inducing multimodal treatments and dose-dense, dose-intense protocols. In patients with metastatic disease, the prevalence of cancer-related fatigue exceeds 75%, and cancer survivors report that fatigue is a disruptive symptom months or even years after treatment ends. Patients perceive fatigue to be the most distressing symptom associated with cancer and its treatment, more distressing even than pain or nausea and vomiting, which, for most patients, can generally be managed with medications.

For the most recent version of the guidelines, please visit NCCN.org

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Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma

St. Jude Children's Research Hospital

An estimated 33,370 people will die of pancreatic cancer in the United States in 2007, making it the fourth most common cause of cancer-related death among men in the United States. Although incidence is roughly equal among men and women, African Americans appear to have a higher incidence of pancreatic cancer than white Americans. The NCCN Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma Guidelines discuss risk factors, diagnosis and staging, and treatment through palliative care or surveillance for patients with tumors of the exocrine pancreas. Overall, in view of the poor outcome of patients with all stages of pancreatic cancer, the NCCN panel recommends that investigational options be considered in all phases of disease management. Specific palliative measures are recommended for patients with advanced pancreatic adenocarcinoma characterized by biliary or gastric obstruction, severe abdominal pain, or other tumor-associated manifestations of the disease.

For the most recent version of the guidelines, please visit NCCN.org