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Shira Dinner and Ranjana Advani

Although frontline treatment of advanced Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) produces high cure rates, disease either will not respond to or will relapse after initial therapy in approximately a quarter of patients. Many patients with disease relapse can be successfully salvaged with second-line chemotherapy followed by autologous stem cell transplantation (ASCT). Patients whose disease relapses after ASCT are rarely cured. A unique pathophysiologic feature of HL is that the malignant Reed-Sternberg (HRS) cell is rare and resides within a microenvironment of inflammatory and immune-related cells. The recent FDA approval of the anti-CD30 antibody-drug conjugate brentuximab vedotin (BV) for patients with either primary refractory HL or those whose disease relapses after ASCT represents a major advance in therapy. This article focuses on BV and other novel agents that target the HRS cell surface, intracellular signaling pathways, and tumor microenvironment.

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Peter F. Coccia, Alberto S. Pappo, Lynda Beaupin, Virginia F. Borges, Scott C. Borinstein, Rashmi Chugh, Shira Dinner, Jeanelle Folbrecht, A. Lindsay Frazier, Robert Goldsby, Alexandra Gubin, Robert Hayashi, Mary S. Huang, Michael P. Link, John A. Livingston, Yousif Matloub, Frederick Millard, Kevin C. Oeffinger, Diane Puccetti, Damon Reed, Steven Robinson, Abby R. Rosenberg, Tara Sanft, Holly L. Spraker-Perlman, Margaret von Mehren, Daniel S. Wechsler, Kimberly F. Whelan, Nicholas Yeager, Lisa A. Gurski, and Dorothy A. Shead

This selection from the NCCN Guidelines for Adolescent and Young Adult (AYA) Oncology focuses on treatment and management considerations for AYA patients with cancer. Compared with older adults with cancer, AYA patients have unique needs regarding treatment, fertility counseling, psychosocial and behavioral issues, and supportive care services. The complete version of the NCCN Guidelines for AYA Oncology addresses additional aspects of caring for AYA patients, including risk factors, screening, diagnosis, and survivorship.

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Jeffrey Crawford, Pamela Sue Becker, James O. Armitage, Douglas W. Blayney, Julio Chavez, Peter Curtin, Shira Dinner, Thomas Fynan, Ivana Gojo, Elizabeth A. Griffiths, Shannon Hough, Dwight D. Kloth, David J. Kuter, Gary H. Lyman, Mary Mably, Sudipto Mukherjee, Shiven Patel, Lia E. Perez, Adam Poust, Raajit Rampal, Vivek Roy, Hope S. Rugo, Ayman A. Saad, Lee S. Schwartzberg, Sepideh Shayani, Mahsa Talbott, Saroj Vadhan-Raj, Sumithira Vasu, Martha Wadleigh, Peter Westervelt, Jennifer L. Burns, and Lenora Pluchino

Myeloid growth factors (MGFs) are given as supportive care to patients receiving myelosuppressive chemotherapy to reduce the incidence of neutropenia. This selection from the NCCN Guidelines for MGFs focuses on the evaluation of regimen- and patient-specific risk factors for the development of febrile neutropenia (FN), the prophylactic use of MGFs for the prevention of chemotherapy-induced FN, and assessing the risks and benefits of MGF use in clinical practice.

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Pamela Sue Becker, Elizabeth A. Griffiths, Laura M. Alwan, Kimo Bachiashvili, Anna Brown, Rita Cool, Peter Curtin, Shira Dinner, Ivana Gojo, Ashley Hicks, Avyakta Kallam, Wajih Zaheer Kidwai, Dwight D. Kloth, Eric H. Kraut, Daniel Landsburg, Gary H. Lyman, Ryan Miller, Sudipto Mukherjee, Shiven Patel, Lia E. Perez, Adam Poust, Raajit Rampal, Rachel Rosovsky, Vivek Roy, Hope S. Rugo, Sepideh Shayani, Sumithira Vasu, Martha Wadleigh, Kelly Westbrook, Peter Westervelt, Jennifer Burns, Jennifer Keller, and Lenora A. Pluchino

Management of febrile neutropenia (FN) is an integral part of supportive care for patients undergoing cancer treatment. The NCCN Guidelines for Hematopoietic Growth Factors provide suggestions for appropriate evaluation, risk determination, prophylaxis, and management of FN. These NCCN Guidelines are intended to guide clinicians in the appropriate use of growth factors for select patients undergoing treatment of nonmyeloid malignancies. These NCCN Guidelines Insights highlight important updates to the NCCN Guidelines regarding the incorporation of newly FDA-approved granulocyte-colony stimulating factor biosimilars for the prevention and treatment of FN.

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Patrick A. Brown, Bijal Shah, Anjali Advani, Patricia Aoun, Michael W. Boyer, Patrick W. Burke, Daniel J. DeAngelo, Shira Dinner, Amir T. Fathi, Jordan Gauthier, Nitin Jain, Suzanne Kirby, Michaela Liedtke, Mark Litzow, Aaron Logan, Selina Luger, Lori J. Maness, Stephanie Massaro, Ryan J. Mattison, William May, Olalekan Oluwole, Jae Park, Amanda Przespolewski, Sravanti Rangaraju, Jeffrey E. Rubnitz, Geoffrey L. Uy, Madhuri Vusirikala, Matthew Wieduwilt, Beth Lynn, Ryan A. Berardi, Deborah A. Freedman-Cass, and Mallory Campbell

The NCCN Guidelines for Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (ALL) focus on the classification of ALL subtypes based on immunophenotype and cytogenetic/molecular markers; risk assessment and stratification for risk-adapted therapy; treatment strategies for Philadelphia chromosome (Ph)-positive and Ph-negative ALL for both adolescent and young adult and adult patients; and supportive care considerations. Given the complexity of ALL treatment regimens and the required supportive care measures, the NCCN ALL Panel recommends that patients be treated at a specialized cancer center with expertise in the management of ALL This portion of the Guidelines focuses on the management of Ph-positive and Ph-negative ALL in adolescents and young adults, and management in relapsed settings.