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Shaji K. Kumar

Multiple myeloma (MM) is a complex disease characterized by considerable genetic heterogeneity. The updated NCCN Guidelines for MM have added new “preferred” regimens for transplant and nontransplant candidates, and have moved some formerly “preferred” regimens to the “other” category. Supportive care has improved outcomes for patients, and new treatments in combination have extended survival for patients with MM. Novel agents on the horizon are poised to raise the bar even further.

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Shaji K. Kumar

The most recent NCCN Guidelines for Multiple Myeloma include a ranking of the many treatment options for various settings as “preferred,” “other,” and “useful in certain circumstances.” For patients eligible for autologous stem cell transplant (ASCT), the preferred regimen remains bortezomib/lenalidomide/dexamethasone (category 1) or bortezomib/cyclophosphamide/dexamethasone. Upfront ASCT also remains a preferred strategy for patients who are transplant-eligible, despite highly effective newer agents such as induction therapy. Double (tandem) ASCT may benefit patients with high-risk cytogenetics, such as 17p deletion. Lenalidomide maintenance is the standard posttransplant approach and results in improved progression-free and overall survivals. For relapsed disease, a host of new agents have been shown to improve outcomes, mostly in combination with bortezomib or lenalidomide, but their selection depends largely on response and tolerability to prior therapies.

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Allison Matthews, Surbhi Sidana, Lauren Seymour, Nancy Pick, James Pringnitz, David Argue, Gina Lange, Eva Brandes, Allison McClanahan, Adrienne Nedved, Suzanne Hayman, Saad Kenderian, Shaji Kumar, David Dingli, Taxiarchis Kourelis, Rahma Warsame, Prashant Kapoor, Mithun Shah, Hassan Alkhateeb, Patrick Johnston, Stephen Ansell, Nabila Bennani, Mustaqeem Siddiqui and Yi Lin

Background: The patient/caregiver experience during CAR-T therapy is stressful, overwhelming, terrifying, and often a patient’s last treatment option. The Mayo Clinic Robert D. and Patricia E. Kern Center for the Science of Health Care Delivery Innovation and Design team has worked with the CAR-T therapy clinical team to develop a patient experience that provides patients with a sense of caring, supportive environment, timely knowledge, and realistic expectations. Using a human-centered design approach, the Innovation and Design team worked with patients and caregivers to understand latent and unspoken needs in order to develop an ideal CAR-T therapy patient journey. Methods: With qualitative interviewing techniques, patient observation, and low fidelity experimentation, 21 patients/caregiver pairs were interviewed throughout their CAR-T therapy experience in 2018. Patients were interviewed at several touch points as well as encouraged to reach out to the Innovation and Design team at any point with reflections on their experiences. Patients were recruited as they began their evaluation phase for CAR-T therapy. The interviews were unscripted to allow for a breadth of discovery by not constraining the conversations to previously developed themes. As themes emerged from patient/caregiver interviews, artifacts and interventions were designed to alleviate pain points and improve the patient/caregiver experience. These artifacts and interventions were integrated into the clinical processes in real time and patient/caregivers were interviewed to understand the impact of these activities. Results: Several themes emerged from qualitative interviews with patients and caregivers. From the themes, interventions were developed. We were able to demonstrate a qualitative improvement in patient/caregiver experience through these interventions (Figure 1). Conclusions: Patients/caregivers undergoing CAR-T therapy have unique issues surrounding the logistics of care, emotional burden, and physical effects of treatment. We implemented processes to address these issues and observed a qualitative improvement via patient interviews/feedback. Ongoing work includes optimizing remote monitoring, digital platforms for patient education, and a quantitative study looking at patient reported outcomes (PROs) in such patients. To our knowledge, this is the first report for care delivery optimization in real-world practice for this new therapy.

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Kenneth C. Anderson, Melissa Alsina, Djordje Atanackovic, J. Sybil Biermann, Jason C. Chandler, Caitlin Costello, Benjamin Djulbegovic, Henry C. Fung, Cristina Gasparetto, Kelly Godby, Craig Hofmeister, Leona Holmberg, Sarah Holstein, Carol Ann Huff, Adetola Kassim, Amrita Y. Krishnan, Shaji K. Kumar, Michaela Liedtke, Matthew Lunning, Noopur Raje, Seema Singhal, Clayton Smith, George Somlo, Keith Stockerl-Goldstein, Steven P. Treon, Donna Weber, Joachim Yahalom, Dorothy A. Shead and Rashmi Kumar

Multiple myeloma (MM) is a malignant neoplasm of plasma cells that accumulate in bone marrow, leading to bone destruction and marrow failure. Recent statistics from the American Cancer Society indicate that the incidence of MM is increasing. The NCCN Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology (NCCN Guidelines) included in this issue address management of patients with solitary plasmacytoma and newly diagnosed MM.

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Shaji K. Kumar, Natalie S. Callander, Melissa Alsina, Djordje Atanackovic, J. Sybil Biermann, Jason C. Chandler, Caitlin Costello, Matthew Faiman, Henry C. Fung, Cristina Gasparetto, Kelly Godby, Craig Hofmeister, Leona Holmberg, Sarah Holstein, Carol Ann Huff, Adetola Kassim, Michaela Liedtke, Thomas Martin, James Omel, Noopur Raje, Frederic J. Reu, Seema Singhal, George Somlo, Keith Stockerl-Goldstein, Steven P. Treon, Donna Weber, Joachim Yahalom, Dorothy A. Shead and Rashmi Kumar

Multiple myeloma (MM) is caused by the neoplastic proliferation of plasma cells. These neoplastic plasma cells proliferate and produce monoclonal immunoglobulin in the bone marrow causing skeletal damage, a hallmark of multiple myeloma. Other MM-related complications include hypercalcemia, renal insufficiency, anemia, and infections. The NCCN Multiple Myeloma Panel members have developed guidelines for the management of patients with various plasma cell dyscrasias, including solitary plasmacytoma, smoldering myeloma, multiple myeloma, systemic light chain amyloidosis, and Waldenström's macroglobulinemia. The recommendations specific to the diagnosis and treatment of patients with newly diagnosed MM are discussed in this article.

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Kenneth C. Anderson, Melissa Alsina, Djordje Atanackovic, J. Sybil Biermann, Jason C. Chandler, Caitlin Costello, Benjamin Djulbegovic, Henry C. Fung, Cristina Gasparetto, Kelly Godby, Craig Hofmeister, Leona Holmberg, Sarah Holstein, Carol Ann Huff, Adetola Kassim, Amrita Y. Krishnan, Shaji K. Kumar, Michaela Liedtke, Matthew Lunning, Noopur Raje, Frederic J. Reu, Seema Singhal, George Somlo, Keith Stockerl-Goldstein, Steven P. Treon, Donna Weber, Joachim Yahalom, Dorothy A. Shead and Rashmi Kumar

These NCCN Guidelines Insights highlight the important updates/changes specific to the 2016 version of the NCCN Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology for Multiple Myeloma. These changes include updated recommendations to the overall management of multiple myeloma from diagnosis and staging to new treatment options.

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Shaji K. Kumar, Natalie S. Callander, Melissa Alsina, Djordje Atanackovic, J. Sybil Biermann, Jorge Castillo, Jason C. Chandler, Caitlin Costello, Matthew Faiman, Henry C. Fung, Kelly Godby, Craig Hofmeister, Leona Holmberg, Sarah Holstein, Carol Ann Huff, Yubin Kang, Adetola Kassim, Michaela Liedtke, Ehsan Malek, Thomas Martin, Vishala T. Neppalli, James Omel, Noopur Raje, Seema Singhal, George Somlo, Keith Stockerl-Goldstein, Donna Weber, Joachim Yahalom, Rashmi Kumar and Dorothy A. Shead

The NCCN Guidelines for Multiple Myeloma provide recommendations for diagnosis, evaluation, treatment, including supportive-care, and follow-up for patients with myeloma. These NCCN Guidelines Insights highlight the important updates/changes specific to the myeloma therapy options in the 2018 version of the NCCN Guidelines.