Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 8 of 8 items for

  • Author: Scott Schuetze x
Clear All Modify Search
Full access

Scott M. Schuetze

Sarcomas of bone are rare malignancies diagnosed in fewer than 3000 individuals yearly in the United States. Ewing's sarcoma and most osteosarcoma are high-grade neoplasms and account for approximately one half of bone sarcoma cases. Fewer than 20% of patients presenting with localized Ewing's sarcoma or osteosarcoma are cured with surgery alone. Current management typically involves collaboration among orthopedic oncologists, medical oncologists, musculoskeletal radiologists, sarcoma pathologists, and radiation oncologists. Modern multidisciplinary management of Ewing's sarcoma and osteosarcoma has improved the cure rate of patients with localized disease to more than 50%. Primary chemotherapy for high-grade bone sarcomas often involves intensive, multiagent regimens, and few secondary chemotherapy options are available to treat refractory or relapsed disease. Patient participation in clinical trials of novel therapies for Ewing's sarcoma and osteosarcoma should be strongly encouraged.

Full access

Scott M. Schuetze and Michael E. Ray

Wide surgical excision is the backbone of therapy for localized soft tissue sarcoma and often produces excellent results. Patients with a marginal resection of disease and high-grade or large tumors are at an increased risk of recurrence. Radiation therapy (external beam or brachytherapy) has been shown to reduce the risk of local recurrence of disease and should be offered to patients with large (>5 cm) or high-grade sarcomas, especially if a wide resection cannot be performed. Use of preoperative versus postoperative radiation therapy should be planned, in consultation with a radiation oncologist and a surgical oncologist, before resection of the sarcoma if possible. Chemotherapy using an anthracycline- and ifosfamide-based regimen may improve disease-free and overall survival rates. Chemotherapy appears to be most beneficial for patients with very large (≥10 cm), high-grade sarcomas of the extremity who are at a high risk of experiencing distant recurrence of disease. The effect of adjuvant chemotherapy on overall survival remains controversial. Research is greatly needed to identify the patients who are most likely to benefit from conventional chemotherapy, improve the treatment of retroperitoneal sarcomas, and identify novel agents that may impact the natural history of high-risk soft tissue sarcoma.

Full access

George D. Demetri, Margaret von Mehren, Cristina R. Antonescu, Ronald P. DeMatteo, Kristen N. Ganjoo, Robert G. Maki, Peter W.T. Pisters, Chandrajit P. Raut, Richard F. Riedel, Scott Schuetze, Hema M. Sundar, Jonathan C. Trent and Jeffrey D. Wayne

The standard of care for managing patients with gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) rapidly changed after the introduction of effective molecularly targeted therapies involving tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs), such as imatinib mesylate and sunitinib malate. A better understanding of the molecular characteristics of GISTs have improved the diagnostic accuracy and led to the discovery of novel immunomarkers and new mechanisms of resistance to TKI therapy, which in turn have resulted in the development of novel treatment strategies. To address these issues, the NCCN organized a task force consisting of a multidisciplinary panel of experts in the fields of medical oncology, surgical oncology, molecular diagnostics, and pathology to discuss the recent advances, identify areas of future research, and recommend an optimal approach to care for patients with GIST at all stages of disease. The task force met for the first time in October 2003 and again in December 2006 and October 2009. This supplement describes the recent developments in the field of GIST as discussed at the October 2009 meeting.

Full access

Margaret von Mehren, R. Lor Randall, Robert S. Benjamin, Sarah Boles, Marilyn M. Bui, Ernest U. Conrad III, Kristen N. Ganjoo, Suzanne George, Ricardo J. Gonzalez, Martin J. Heslin, John M. Kane III, Henry Koon, Joel Mayerson, Martin McCarter, Sean V. McGarry, Christian Meyer, Richard J. O'Donnell, Alberto S. Pappo, I. Benjamin Paz, Ivy A. Petersen, John D. Pfeifer, Richard F. Riedel, Scott Schuetze, Karen D. Schupak, Herbert S. Schwartz, William D. Tap, Jeffrey D. Wayne, Mary Anne Bergman and Jillian Scavone

Soft tissue sarcomas (STS) are rare solid tumors of mesenchymal cell origin that display a heterogenous mix of clinical and pathologic characteristics. STS can develop from fat, muscle, nerves, blood vessels, and other connective tissues. The evaluation and treatment of patients with STS requires a multidisciplinary team with demonstrated expertise in the management of these tumors. The complete NCCN Guidelines for Soft Tissue Sarcoma (available at NCCN.org) provide recommendations for the diagnosis, evaluation, and treatment of extremity/superficial trunk/head and neck STS, as well as intra-abdominal/retroperitoneal STS, gastrointestinal stromal tumor, desmoid tumors, and rhabdomyosarcoma. This manuscript discusses guiding principles for the diagnosis and staging of STS and evidence for treatment modalities that include surgery, radiation, chemoradiation, chemotherapy, and targeted therapy.

Full access

Margaret von Mehren, R. Lor Randall, Robert S. Benjamin, Sarah Boles, Marilyn M. Bui, Ephraim S. Casper, Ernest U. Conrad III, Thomas F. DeLaney, Kristen N. Ganjoo, Suzanne George, Ricardo J. Gonzalez, Martin J. Heslin, John M. Kane III, Joel Mayerson, Sean V. McGarry, Christian Meyer, Richard J. O’Donnell, Alberto S. Pappo, I. Benjamin Paz, John D. Pfeifer, Richard F. Riedel, Scott Schuetze, Karen D. Schupak, Herbert S. Schwartz, Brian A. Van Tine, Jeffrey D. Wayne, Mary Anne Bergman and Hema Sundar

Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST) are the most common soft tissue sarcoma of the gastrointestinal tract, resulting most commonly from KIT or platelet-derived growth factor receptor α (PDGFRα)-activating mutations. These NCCN Guideline Insights highlight the important updates to the NCCN Guidelines for Soft Tissue Sarcoma specific to the management of patients with GIST experiencing disease progression while on imatinib and/or sunitinib.

Full access

Soft Tissue Sarcoma, Version 2.2012

Featured Updates to the NCCN Guidelines

Margaret von Mehren, Robert S. Benjamin, Marilyn M. Bui, Ephraim S. Casper, Ernest U. Conrad III, Thomas F. DeLaney, Kristen N. Ganjoo, Suzanne George, Ricardo Gonzalez, Martin J. Heslin, John M. Kane III, Joel Mayerson, Sean V. McGarry, Christian Meyer, Richard J. O'Donnell, Benjamin Paz, John D. Pfeifer, Raphael E. Pollock, R. Lor Randall, Richard F. Riedel, Scott Schuetze, Karen D. Schupak, Herbert S. Schwartz, Sridhar Shankar, Brian A. Van Tine, Jeffrey Wayne, Hema Sundar and Nicole R. McMillian

The major changes to the 2012 and 2011 NCCN Guidelines for Soft Tissue Sarcoma pertain to the management of patients with gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) and desmoid tumors (aggressive fibromatosis). Postoperative imatinib following complete resection for primary GIST with no preoperative imatinib is now included as a category 1 recommendation for patients with intermediate or high risk of recurrence. The panel also reaffirmed the recommendation for preoperative use of imatinib in patients with GISTs that are resectable with negative margins but associated with significant surgical morbidity. Observation was included as an option for patients with resectable desmoid tumors that are small and asymptomatic, not causing morbidity, pain, or functional limitation. Sorafenib is included as an option for systemic therapy for patients with desmoid tumors.

Full access

Margaret von Mehren, R. Lor Randall, Robert S. Benjamin, Sarah Boles, Marilyn M. Bui, Ephraim S. Casper, Ernest U. Conrad III, Thomas F. DeLaney, Kristen N. Ganjoo, Suzanne George, Ricardo J. Gonzalez, Martin J. Heslin, John M. Kane III, Joel Mayerson, Sean V. McGarry, Christian Meyer, Richard J. O’Donnell, Alberto S. Pappo, I. Benjamin Paz, John D. Pfeifer, Richard F. Riedel, Scott Schuetze, Karen D. Schupak, Herbert S. Schwartz, Brian A. Van Tine, Jeffrey D. Wayne, Mary Anne Bergman and Hema Sundar

These NCCN Guidelines Insights highlight the important updates to the NCCN Guidelines for Soft Tissue Sarcoma (STS) specific to the role of radiation therapy in the management of patients with retroperitoneal/intra-abdominal STS. The guidelines have also included recommendations for genetic testing and counseling for patients with a clinical and/or family history of genetic cancer syndromes associated with a predisposition for the development of STS.

Full access

Margaret von Mehren, R. Lor Randall, Robert S. Benjamin, Sarah Boles, Marilyn M. Bui, Kristen N. Ganjoo, Suzanne George, Ricardo J. Gonzalez, Martin J. Heslin, John M. Kane III, Vicki Keedy, Edward Kim, Henry Koon, Joel Mayerson, Martin McCarter, Sean V. McGarry, Christian Meyer, Zachary S. Morris, Richard J. O'Donnell, Alberto S. Pappo, I. Benjamin Paz, Ivy A. Petersen, John D. Pfeifer, Richard F. Riedel, Bernice Ruo, Scott Schuetze, William D. Tap, Jeffrey D. Wayne, Mary Anne Bergman and Jillian L. Scavone

Soft tissue sarcomas (STS) are rare solid tumors of mesenchymal cell origin that display a heterogenous mix of clinical and pathologic characteristics. STS can develop from fat, muscle, nerves, blood vessels, and other connective tissues. The evaluation and treatment of patients with STS requires a multidisciplinary team with demonstrated expertise in the management of these tumors. The complete NCCN Guidelines for STS provide recommendations for the diagnosis, evaluation, and treatment of extremity/superficial trunk/head and neck STS, as well as intra-abdominal/retroperitoneal STS, gastrointestinal stromal tumors, desmoid tumors, and rhabdomyosarcoma. This portion of the NCCN Guidelines discusses general principles for the diagnosis, staging, and treatment of STS of the extremities, superficial trunk, or head and neck; outlines treatment recommendations by disease stage; and reviews the evidence to support the guidelines recommendations.