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Ali Bazarbachi, Hamdy A. Azim, Hussain Alizadeh, Mahmoud Aljurf, Ibrahim Barista, Naeem A. Chaudhri, Zahira Fahed, Omar A. Fahmy, Ardeshir Ghavamzadeh, Mohamed H. Khalaf, Sami Khatib, Aghiad Kutoubi, Semra Paydas, Hanadi Rafii Elayoubi, Ghazi Zaatari, Hamdy M. Zawam and Andrew D. Zelenetz

In the Middle East and North Africa (MENA) region, cancer has many epidemiologic and clinical features that are different from those in the rest of the world. Additionally, the region has a relatively young population and large disparities in the availability of resources at diagnostic and treatment levels. A critical need exists for regional guidelines on cancer care, including those for lymphoid malignancies. A panel of lymphoma experts from MENA reviewed the 2009 version of the NCCN Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology (NCCN Guidelines) on Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma and Hodgkin Lymphoma and suggested modifications for the region that were discussed with the United States NCCN Lymphoma Panels. This article presents the consensus recommendations.

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Omalkhair Abulkhair, Nagi Saghir, Lobna Sedky, Ahmed Saadedin, Heba Elzahwary, Neelam Siddiqui, Mervat Al Saleh, Fady Geara, Nuha Birido, Nadia Al-Eissa, Sana Al Sukhun, Huda Abdulkareem, Menar Mohamed Ayoub, Fawaz Deirawan, Salah Fayaz, Alaa Kandil, Sami Khatib, Mufid El-Mistiri, Dorria Salem, El Siah Hassan Sayd, Mohammed Jaloudi, Mohammad Jahanzeb and William I. Gradishar

Published data from the Middle East and North Africa (MENA) region indicate suboptimal quality of cancer care, while the World Health Organization predicts an increase in cancer cases in developing countries. Major advances in breast cancer management mandate the development of guidelines to improve the quality and efficacy of oncology practice in the MENA region. A Breast Cancer Regional Guidelines Committee was organized and activated, comprising experts from various regional cancer institutions. The multidisciplinary team included 12 medical oncologists, 3 radiation oncologists, 2 radiologists, 2 surgeons, and 1 pathologist. The committee members agreed on adapting the current NCCN Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology (NCCN Guidelines) on Breast Cancer for use in the MENA region to achieve common practice standards for treating patients. The members suggested several modifications to the guidelines, especially those related to risk factor profiles. United States–based NCCN experts reviewed these recommendations before final approval. The MENA–NCCN Breast Cancer Guidelines modification process was the first initiative in the development of common practice guidelines in the region. This project may serve as a foundation for the development of evidence-based practice standards, and improve collaborative projects and initiatives.