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Roswell Park Cancer Institute

Approximately 11,960 people will be diagnosed with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) in 2005, and 9,000 patients will die of the disease. As the population ages, the incidence of AML, along with myelodysplasia, appears to be rising. Equally disturbing is the increasing incidence of treatment-related myelodysplasia and leukemia in survivors of tumors of childhood and young adulthood such as Hodgkin's disease, sarcomas, breast and testicular cancers, and lymphomas. Recent large clinical trials have highlighted the need for new, innovative strategies because outcomes for AML patients, particularly older patients, have not substantially changed in the past 3 decades.

For the most recent version of the guidelines, please visit NCCN.org

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Roswell Park Cancer Institute

In 2007, an estimated 41,420 new cases of rectal cancer will occur in the United States (23,840 cases in men; 17,580 cases in women). The guidelines for rectal cancer overlap considerably with those for colon cancer, and the panel unanimously endorses patient participation in a clinical trial over standard or accepted therapy in both. This is especially true for cases of advanced disease and for patients with locally aggressive colorectal cancer who are receiving combined modality treatment.

The latest updates of the NCCN Anal Carcinoma Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology are available online at www.nccn.org.

For the most recent version of the guidelines, please visit NCCN.org

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Roswell Park Cancer Institute

Colorectal cancer is the third most frequently diagnosed cancer in men and women in the United States. An estimated 112,340 new cases of colon cancer will occur in 2007 and an estimated 52,180 people will die from colon and rectal cancer in the same year. Despite these statistics, mortality from colon cancer has decreased over the past 30 years, possibly because of earlier diagnosis through screening and better treatment modalities. These guidelines begin with the clinical presentation of the patient to the primary care physician or gastroenterologist and address diagnosis, pathologic staging, surgical management, adjuvant treatment, management of recurrent and metastatic disease, and patient surveillance.

For the most recent version of the guidelines, please visit NCCN.org

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Roswell Park Cancer Institute

The myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) represent myeloid clonal hemopathies with relatively heterogeneous spectrums of presentation. The major clinical problems in these disorders are morbidities caused by patients' cytopenias and the potential for MDS to evolve into acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Managing MDS is complicated by the generally advanced age of the patients (median ages range from 65–70 years), the attendant non-hematologic comorbidities, and older patients' relative inability to tolerate certain intensive forms of therapy. In addition, when the illness progresses into AML, these patients experience lower response rates to standard therapy than patients with de novo AML.

For the most recent version of the guidelines, please visit NCCN.org