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Omission of Adjuvant Therapy After Gastric Cancer Resection: Development of a Validated Risk Model

Jashodeep Datta, Matthew T. McMillan, Eric K. Shang, Ronac Mamtani, Russell S. Lewis Jr, Rachel R. Kelz, Ursina Teitelbaum, John P. Plastaras, Jeffrey A. Drebin, Douglas L. Fraker, Giorgos C. Karakousis, and Robert E. Roses

NCCN Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology (NCCN Guidelines) for Gastric Cancer recommend adjuvant chemotherapy with or without radiotherapy following after resection of gastric adenocarcinoma (GA) for patients who have not received neoadjuvant therapy. Despite frequent noncompliance with NCCN Guidelines nationally, risk factors underlying adjuvant therapy omission (ATom) have not been well characterized. We developed an internally validated preoperative instrument stratifying patients by incremental risk of ATom. The National Cancer Data Base was queried for patients with stage IB–III GA undergoing gastrectomy; those receiving neoadjuvant therapy were excluded. Multivariable models identified factors associated with ATom between 2006 and 2011. Internal validation was performed using bootstrap analysis; model discrimination and calibration were assessed using k-fold cross-validation and Hosmer-Lemeshow procedures, respectively. Using weighted β-coefficients, a simplified Omission Risk Score (ORS) was created to stratify ATom risk. The impact of ATom on overall survival (OS) was examined in ORS risk-stratified cohorts. In 4,728 patients (median age, 70 years; 64.8% male), 53.7% had ATom. The bootstrap-validated model identified advancing age, comorbidity, underinsured/uninsured status, proximal tumor location, and clinical T1/2 and N0 tumors as independent ATom predictors, demonstrating good discrimination. The simplified ORS, stratifying patients into low-, moderate-, and high-risk categories, predicted incremental risk of ATom (30% vs 53% vs 80%, respectively) and progressive delay to adjuvant therapy initiation (median time, 51 vs 55 vs 61 days, respectively). Patients at moderate/high-risk of ATom demonstrated worsening risk-adjusted mortality compared with low-risk patients (median OS, 26.4 vs 29.2 months). This ORS may aid in rational selection of multimodality treatment sequence in GA.

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NCCN Guidelines® Insights: Bladder Cancer, Version 3.2024

Featured Updates to the NCCN Guidelines

Thomas W. Flaig, Philippe E. Spiess, Michael Abern, Neeraj Agarwal, Rick Bangs, Mark K. Buyyounouski, Kevin Chan, Sam S. Chang, Paul Chang, Terence Friedlander, Richard E. Greenberg, Khurshid A. Guru, Harry W. Herr, Jean Hoffman-Censits, Hristos Kaimakliotis, Amar U. Kishan, Shilajit Kundu, Subodh M. Lele, Ronac Mamtani, Omar Y. Mian, Jeff Michalski, Jeffrey S. Montgomery, Mamta Parikh, Anthony Patterson, Charles Peyton, Elizabeth R. Plimack, Mark A. Preston, Kyle Richards, Wade J. Sexton, Arlene O. Siefker-Radtke, Tyler Stewart, Debasish Sundi, Matthew Tollefson, Jonathan Tward, Jonathan L. Wright, Carly J. Cassara, and Lisa A. Gurski

Bladder cancer, the sixth most common cancer in the United States, is most commonly of the urothelial carcinoma histologic subtype. The clinical spectrum of bladder cancer is divided into 3 categories that differ in prognosis, management, and therapeutic aims: (1) non–muscle-invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC); (2) muscle invasive, nonmetastatic disease; and (3) metastatic bladder cancer. These NCCN Guidelines Insights detail recent updates to the NCCN Guidelines for Bladder Cancer, including changes in the fifth edition of the WHO Classification of Tumours: Urinary and Male Genital Tumours and how the NCCN Guidelines aligned with these updates; new and emerging treatment options for bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG)–unresponsive NMIBC; and updates to systemic therapy recommendations for advanced or metastatic disease.

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NCCN Guidelines® Insights: Bladder Cancer, Version 2.2022

Featured Updates to the NCCN Guidelines

Thomas W. Flaig, Philippe E. Spiess, Michael Abern, Neeraj Agarwal, Rick Bangs, Stephen A. Boorjian, Mark K. Buyyounouski, Kevin Chan, Sam Chang, Terence Friedlander, Richard E. Greenberg, Khurshid A. Guru, Harry W. Herr, Jean Hoffman-Censits, Amar Kishan, Shilajit Kundu, Subodh M. Lele, Ronac Mamtani, Vitaly Margulis, Omar Y. Mian, Jeff Michalski, Jeffrey S. Montgomery, Lakshminarayanan Nandagopal, Lance C. Pagliaro, Mamta Parikh, Anthony Patterson, Elizabeth R. Plimack, Kamal S. Pohar, Mark A. Preston, Kyle Richards, Wade J. Sexton, Arlene O. Siefker-Radtke, Matthew Tollefson, Jonathan Tward, Jonathan L. Wright, Mary A. Dwyer, Carly J. Cassara, and Lisa A. Gurski

The NCCN Guidelines for Bladder Cancer provide recommendations for the diagnosis, evaluation, treatment, and follow-up of patients with bladder cancer and other urinary tract cancers (upper tract tumors, urothelial carcinoma of the prostate, primary carcinoma of the urethra). These NCCN Guidelines Insights summarize the panel discussion behind recent important updates to the guidelines regarding the treatment of non–muscle-invasive bladder cancer, including how to treat in the event of a bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) shortage; new roles for immune checkpoint inhibitors in non–muscle invasive, muscle-invasive, and metastatic bladder cancer; and the addition of antibody–drug conjugates for metastatic bladder cancer.