Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 17 items for

  • Author: Richard T. Cheney x
Clear All Modify Search
Full access

Richard T. Cheney

Thymoma is the most common anterior mediastinal tumor in adults and is frequently associated with autoimmune disorders such as myasthenia gravis. Thymomas are a diverse group of epithelial neoplasms with a behavioral spectrum that spans the complete clinical gamut from entirely benign to highly aggressive, lethal thymic carcinomas. The biologic behavior seems to depend primarily on the clinical stage at presentation and histologic subtype. This article discusses thymic organogenesis, Masaoka staging, WHO histologic classification of thymoma and thymic carcinoma, and selected molecular characteristics that highlight this diversity. This discussion will further underscore both the similarities and differences between categories of thymic epithelial neoplasms and offer support for the notion that tumor heterogeneity and/or tumor progression may explain the observed clinical variation in behavior. Recommendations are offered for future investigational approaches to further the understanding of the complexity of these tumors.

Full access

Stanley J. Miller, Murad Alam, James Andersen, Daniel Berg, Christopher K. Bichakjian, Glen Bowen, Richard T. Cheney, L. Frank Glass, Roy C. Grekin, Dennis E. Hallahan, Anne Kessinger, Nancy Y. Lee, Nanette Liegeois, Daniel D. Lydiatt, Jeff Michalski, William H. Morrison, Kishwer S. Nehal, Kelly C. Nelson, Paul Nghiem, Thomas Olencki, Allan R. Oseroff, Clifford S. Perlis, E. William Rosenberg, Ashok R. Shaha, Marshall M. Urist and Linda C. Wang

Merkel Cell Carcinoma Clinical Practice Guidelines in OncologyNCCN Categories of Evidence and ConsensusCategory 1: The recommendation is based on high-level evidence (e.g., randomized controlled trials) and there is uniform NCCN consensus.Category 2A: The recommendation is based on lower-level evidence and there is uniform NCCN consensus.Category 2B: The recommendation is based on lower-level evidence and there is nonuniform NCCN consensus (but no major disagreement).Category 3: The recommendation is based on any level of evidence but reflects major disagreement.All recommendations are category 2A unless otherwise noted.Clinical trials: The NCCN believes that the best management for any cancer patient is in a clinical trial. Participation in clinical trials is especially encouraged.OverviewMerkel cell carcinoma (MCC) is a rare, aggressive cutaneous tumor that combines the local recurrence rates of infiltrative non-melanoma skin cancer along with the regional and distant metastatic rates of thick melanoma.1–16 Several large reviews document the development of local recurrence in 25% to 30% of all cases of MCC, regional disease in 52% to 59%, and distant metastatic disease in 34% to 36%.1,16,17 MCC has a mortality rate that exceeds that of melanoma;18 overall 5-year survival rates range from 30% to 64%.3,19 A history of extensive sun exposure is a risk factor for MCC. Older white men (≥ 65 years) are at higher risk for MCC, which tends to occur on the areas of the skin that are exposed to sun.20The NCCN Non-Melanoma Skin Cancer Panel has developed guidelines outlining treatment of...
Full access

Stanley J. Miller, Murad Alam, James Andersen, Daniel Berg, Christopher K. Bichakjian, Glen Bowen, Richard T. Cheney, L. Frank Glass, Roy C. Grekin, Anne Kessinger, Nancy Y. Lee, Nanette Liegeois, Daniel D. Lydiatt, Jeff Michalski, William H. Morrison, Kishwer S. Nehal, Kelly C. Nelson, Paul Nghiem, Thomas Olencki, Clifford S. Perlis, E. William Rosenberg, Ashok R. Shaha, Marshall M. Urist, Linda C. Wang and John A. Zic

Overview Basal and squamous cell skin cancers, collectively known as non-melanoma skin cancers (NMSC), are the most common skin cancers.1,2 More than 1 million cases of NMSC are estimated to be diagnosed each year in the United States and their incidence is rising rapidly.3,4 Basal cell carcinomas are approximately 4 to 5 times more common than squamous cell carcinomas. Although rarely metastatic, basal and squamous cell cancers can produce substantial local destruction along with disfigurement, and may involve extensive areas of soft tissue, cartilage, and bone. The estimated annual cost of treating these 2 diseases in the United States Medicare population exceeds $400 million.5 However, NMSCs generally have a good prognosis. The most significant environmental carcinogen for NMSC is sunlight.6 Thus, individuals in Hawaii are at much greater risk than those in the northern parts of the United States. Fair-skinned individuals who have received too much sun exposure are at the greatest risk for these cancers. Most of these tumors develop on sun-exposed skin sites. The most common sites are on the head and neck area. According to a report from the Childhood Cancer Survivor Study, long-term survivors of childhood and adolescent cancers who have undergone prior radiation therapy are also at risk for developing NMSC.7 Actinic keratoses are sun-induced precancerous lesions.8,9 Bowen's disease is characterized by squamous cell carcinoma in situ lesions that occur predominantly in older persons.10 Both types of lesions, if untreated, can progress to invasive squamous cell carcinoma with the potential for metastasis. Skin cancer preventive...
Full access

Stanley J. Miller, Murad Alam, James S. Andersen, Daniel Berg, Christopher K. Bichakjian, Glen M. Bowen, Richard T. Cheney, L. Frank Glass, Roy C. Grekin, Alan L. Ho, Anne Kessinger, Nanette Liegeois, Daniel D. Lydiatt, Jeff Michalski, William H. Morrison, Kishwer S. Nehal, Kelly C. Nelson, Paul Nghiem, Thomas Olencki, Clifford S. Perlis, Ashok R. Shaha, Malika Tuli, Marshall M. Urist, Linda C. Wang and John A. Zic

Full access

David S. Ettinger, Wallace Akerley, Hossein Borghaei, Andrew Chang, Richard T. Cheney, Lucian R. Chirieac, Thomas A. D'Amico, Todd L. Demmy, Apar Kishor P. Ganti, Ramaswamy Govindan, Frederic W. Grannis, Leora Horn, Thierry M. Jahan, Mohammad Jahanzeb, Anne Kessinger, Ritsuko Komaki, Feng-Ming (Spring) Kong, Mark G. Kris, Lee M. Krug, Inga T. Lennes, Billy W. Loo, Renato Martins, Janis O'Malley, Raymond U. Osarogiagbon, Gregory A. Otterson, Jyoti D. Patel, Mary Pinder Schenck, Katherine M. Pisters, Karen Reckamp, Gregory J. Riely, Eric Rohren, Scott J. Swanson, Douglas E. Wood and Stephen C. Yang

Full access

David S. Ettinger, Wallace Akerley, Hossein Borghaei, Andrew C. Chang, Richard T. Cheney, Lucian R. Chirieac, Thomas A. D’Amico, Todd L. Demmy, Apar Kishor P. Ganti, Ramaswamy Govindan, Frederic W. Grannis Jr, Leora Horn, Thierry M. Jahan, Mohammad Jahanzeb, Anne Kessinger, Ritsuko Komaki, Feng-Ming (Spring) Kong, Mark G. Kris, Lee M. Krug, Inga T. Lennes, Billy W. Loo Jr, Renato Martins, Janis O’Malley, Raymond U. Osarogiagbon, Gregory A. Otterson, Jyoti D. Patel, Mary C. Pinder-Schenck, Katherine M. Pisters, Karen Reckamp, Gregory J. Riely, Eric Rohren, Scott J. Swanson, Douglas E. Wood, Stephen C. Yang, Miranda Hughes and Kristina M. Gregory

Most patients with non–small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) are diagnosed with advanced cancer. These guidelines only include information about stage IV NSCLC. Patients with widespread metastatic disease (stage IV) are candidates for systemic therapy, clinical trials, and/or palliative treatment. The goal is to identify patients with metastatic disease before initiating aggressive treatment, thus sparing these patients from unnecessary futile treatment. If metastatic disease is discovered during surgery, then extensive surgery is often aborted. Decisions about treatment should be based on multidisciplinary discussion.

Full access

David S. Ettinger, Wallace Akerley, Gerold Bepler, Matthew G. Blum, Andrew Chang, Richard T. Cheney, Lucian R. Chirieac, Thomas A. D'Amico, Todd L. Demmy, Apar Kishor P. Ganti, Ramaswamy Govindan, Frederic W. Grannis Jr., Thierry Jahan, Mohammad Jahanzeb, David H. Johnson, Anne Kessinger, Ritsuko Komaki, Feng-Ming Kong, Mark G. Kris, Lee M. Krug, Quynh-Thu Le, Inga T. Lennes, Renato Martins, Janis O'Malley, Raymond U. Osarogiagbon, Gregory A. Otterson, Jyoti D. Patel, Katherine M. Pisters, Karen Reckamp, Gregory J. Riely, Eric Rohren, George R. Simon, Scott J. Swanson, Douglas E. Wood and Stephen C. Yang

Overview Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related death in the United States. An estimated 219,440 new cases (116,090 men; 103,350 women) of lung and bronchus cancer were diagnosed in 2009, and 159,390 deaths (88,900 men; 70,490 women) occurred from the disease.1 Only 15% of all lung cancer patients are alive 5 years or more after diagnosis (http://seer.cancer.gov/statfacts/html/lungb.html). Common symptoms of lung cancer include cough, dyspnea, weight loss, and chest pain; symptomatic patients are more likely to have chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. The primary risk factor for lung cancer is smoking, which accounts for more than 85% of all lung cancer-related deaths.2 The risk for lung cancer increases with the number of cigarettes smoked per day and the number of years spent smoking. In addition to the hazard of first-hand smoke, exposed nonsmokers have an increased relative risk for developing lung cancer.3 Radon gas, a radioactive gas that is produced by the decay of radium 226, is the second leading cause of lung cancer.4 The decay of this isotope leads to the production of substances that emit alpha-particles, which may cause cell damage and therefore increase the potential for malignant transformation. Data suggest that postmenopausal women who smoke or are former smokers should not undergo hormone replacement therapy, because it increases the risk for death from non–small cell lung cancer (NSCLC).5 Asbestos, a mineral compound that breaks into small airborne shards, is a known carcinogen that increases the risk for lung cancer in people exposed to the airborne fibers,...
Full access

David S. Ettinger, Wallace Akerley, Gerold Bepler, Matthew G. Blum, Andrew Chang, Richard T. Cheney, Lucian R. Chirieac, Thomas A. D'Amico, Todd L. Demmy, Ramaswamy Govindan, Frederic W. Grannis Jr., Thierry Jahan, David H. Johnson, Anne Kessinger, Ritsuko Komaki, Feng-Ming Kong, Mark G. Kris, Lee M. Krug, Quynh-Thu Le, Inga T. Lennes, Renato Martins, Janis O'Malley, Raymond U. Osarogiagbon, Gregory A. Otterson, Jyoti D. Patel, Katherine M. Pisters, Karen Reckamp, Gregory J. Riely, Eric Rohren, Scott J. Swanson, Douglas E. Wood and Stephen C. Yang

Overview Masses in the anterior mediastinum include neoplasms (e.g., thymomas, lymphomas, thymic carcinomas, thymic carcinoids, thymolipomas, germ cell tumors, parathyroid adenomas) or nonneoplastic conditions (e.g., intrathoracic goiter, thymic cysts, lymphangiomas, aortic aneurysms).1,2 Thymomas are the most common tumor in the anterior mediastinum.1,3,4 Many mediastinal masses are benign, especially those occurring in asymptomatic patients; however, symptomatic patients often have malignant mediastinal lesions. These guidelines outline the evaluation, treatment, and management of thymomas and thymic carcinomas (see Thymic Masses, opposite column). The WHO histologic classification system can be used to distinguish among thymomas, thymic carcinomas, and thymic carcinoids.3 Lymphomas typically manifest as generalized disease but can also be primary anterior mediastinal lesions (i.e., nodular sclerosing Hodgkin disease and non-Hodgkin's lymphomas [large B-cell lymphoma and lymphoblastic lymphoma]); patients typically have lymphadenopathy [see the NCCN Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology {NCCN Guidelines} for Non-Hodgkin's Lymphomas and Hodgkin Lymphoma].2,5 Thymic carcinoids are rare tumors that are discussed in the NCCN Guidelines for Neuroendocrine Tumors. Teratomas are discussed in the NCCN Guidelines for Testicular Cancer. (To view the most recent version of these guidelines, visit the NCCN Web site at www.NCCN.org.) Thymic Masses All patients with a mediastinal mass should undergo studies to determine the type of mass and extent of disease; these tests should include chest CT with contrast, fludeoxyglucose (FDG)–PET, radiolabeled octreotide scan (optional), complete blood cell counts, and platelets. Pulmonary function tests and MRI of the chest can also be done if clinically indicated. On CT, thymoma can look like malignant mesothelioma; however,...
Full access

David S. Ettinger, Gregory J. Riely, Wallace Akerley, Hossein Borghaei, Andrew C. Chang, Richard T. Cheney, Lucian R. Chirieac, Thomas A. D’Amico, Todd L. Demmy, Ramaswamy Govindan, Frederic W. Grannis Jr, Stefan C. Grant, Leora Horn, Thierry M. Jahan, Ritsuko Komaki, Feng-Ming (Spring) Kong, Mark G. Kris, Lee M. Krug, Rudy P. Lackner, Inga T. Lennes, Billy W. Loo Jr, Renato Martins, Gregory A. Otterson, Jyoti D. Patel, Mary C. Pinder-Schenck, Katherine M. Pisters, Karen Reckamp, Eric Rohren, Theresa A. Shapiro, Scott J. Swanson, Kurt Tauer, Douglas E. Wood, Stephen C. Yang, Kristina Gregory and Miranda Hughes

Masses in the anterior mediastinum can be neoplasms (eg, thymomas, thymic carcinomas, or lung metastases) or non-neoplastic conditions (eg, intrathoracic goiter). Thymomas are the most common primary tumor in the anterior mediastinum, although they are rare. Thymic carcinomas are very rare. Thymomas and thymic carcinomas originate in the thymus. Although thymomas can spread locally, they are much less invasive than thymic carcinomas. Patients with thymomas have 5-year survival rates of approximately 78%. However, 5-year survival rates for thymic carcinomas are only approximately 40%. These guidelines outline the evaluation, treatment, and management of these mediastinal tumors.

Full access

Christopher K. Bichakjian, Thomas Olencki, Murad Alam, James S. Andersen, Daniel Berg, Glen M. Bowen, Richard T. Cheney, Gregory A. Daniels, L. Frank Glass, Roy C. Grekin, Kenneth Grossman, Alan L. Ho, Karl D. Lewis, Daniel D. Lydiatt, William H. Morrison, Kishwer S. Nehal, Kelly C. Nelson, Paul Nghiem, Clifford S. Perlis, Ashok R. Shaha, Wade L. Thorstad, Malika Tuli, Marshall M. Urist, Timothy S. Wang, Andrew E. Werchniak, Sandra L. Wong, John A. Zic, Nicole McMillian, Karin Hoffman and Maria Ho

Dermatofibrosarcoma protuberans (DFSP) is an uncommon soft tissue tumor characterized by a relatively high risk of local recurrence and low risk of metastasis. The NCCN Guidelines for DFSP provide multidisciplinary recommendations on the management of patients with this rare disease. These NCCN Guidelines Insights highlight the addition of the Principles of Pathology section, which provides recommendations on the pathologic assessment of DFSP. Because DFSP can mimic other lesions, immunohistochemical studies are often required to establish diagnosis. Cytogenetic testing for the characteristic translocation t(17;22)(q22;q13) can also be valuable in the differential diagnosis of DFSP with other histologically similar tumors.