Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 23 items for

  • Author: Paul F. Engstrom x
Clear All Modify Search
Full access

Paul F. Engstrom

I am pleased to work with the editor-in-chief of JNCCN, Hal Burstein, MD, PhD, in organizing this issue of the journal dedicated to colon and rectum cancer management, and I appreciate the opportunity to note some of the updates to the field in the past year. In 2009, the NCCN Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology were expanded to include a survivorship component. Long-term follow-up care of colorectal cancer survivors should include management of late complications and encouraging patients to modify their lifestyle through improved exercise and diet. Another major change in the guidelines represented the determination of tumor KRAS gene status before starting treatment with an epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) inhibitor, such as cetuximab or panitumumab. Data included in the guidelines show that patients whose tumor expresses KRAS mutation have little or no likelihood of responding to the EGFR inhibitors. The edition of the guidelines published in this issue also emphasizes the use of systemic combination chemotherapy such as FOLFOX or FOLFIRI with or without bevacizumab in the attempt to reduce the size of colorectal metastasis as well as the primary tumor and to allow patients with initially unresectable disease to be candidates for resection. These changes in the guidelines are reflected and expanded in the authored manuscripts. For example, Denlinger and Barsevick review the literature on colorectal cancer survivorship. They note clear evidence that quality of life is diminished when treatment-related symptoms, such as fatigue, distress, and sleep difficulties) plague colorectal cancer survivors. The long-term effects of treatment,...
Full access

Paul F. Engstrom

Full access

Paul F. Engstrom

Full access

Paul F. Engstrom

The October 2007 issue of JNCCN focuses primarily on colorectal cancer (CRC), with the updated guidelines for CRC diagnosis and management leading the issue. These guidelines emphasize the now multidisciplinary nature of therapy for a disease that was once believed to be surgical: if the surgeon did not remove all of the cancer with adequate margins, patients were destined to develop recurrence. Chemotherapy and radiotherapy were considered salvage or palliative treatment at best. Fortunately, the days of unacceptable recurrence rates and ineffective chemotherapy are past. The NCCN CRC Guidelines Panel reflects this modern approach. Not only does the panel include colorectal surgeons who practice in the busiest academic cancer centers in the country, but radiotherapists, medical oncologists, gastroenterologists, and pathologists who are also highly focused on CRC are included as well. This panel should be commended for producing a critical document that is also understandable for the practicing community. The NCCN staff have done yeomen work to faithfully present the panel's recommendations in a readable format, and they also deserve credit for transforming the guidelines discussion into a scholarly narrative article that documents the rationale behind the guideline recommendations with the appropriate citations. The guidelines algorithms and manuscripts are the most current “textbook” any clinician could desire for education and as a reference for managing CRC patients in his or her practice. This issue also includes authored manuscripts—focused commentaries on 4 of the most controversial and important issues to the clinical management of CRC today. First, Cooper summarizes current literature...
Full access

Fikri İçli, Hakan Akbulut, Shouki Bazarbashi, Mehmet Ayhan Kuzu, Mohandas K. Mallath, Kakil Ibrahim Rasul, Scott Strong, Aamir Ali Syed, Faruk Zorlu and Paul F. Engstrom

Colorectal cancer is less common in the Middle East and South Asia than in western countries, with the rectum the most common primary site, unlike in the United States. A project was planned to address various local issues regarding the management of common cancers, including colorectal cancer, and to adapt the NCCN Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology (NCCN Guidelines) to the Middle East and North Africa (MENA) region. A survey of oncologists in this geographic area showed that the management practices and issues regarding colorectal cancer are similar to those presented in the NCCN Colorectal Cancer Guidelines. However, 2 major differences exist: most oncologists in the MENA region prefer chest radiograph over CT in pretreatment workup, and almost 50% of them prefer to use cetuximab in the first-line treatment of patients with the wild-type KRAS gene. The committee, comprising 9 oncologists from different countries, proposed 4 modifications to the 2009 version of the NCCN Colorectal Cancer Guidelines for use in the MENA region, relating to 1) short-course preoperative radiotherapy, 2) dose of capecitabine, 3) stereotactic radiotherapy for liver metastasis, and 4) qualification of surgeons performing colorectal surgery. The modification of NCCN Colorectal Cancer Guidelines for use in the MENA region represents a step toward creating a uniform practice in the region based on evidence and local experience.

Full access

Paul F. Engstrom, Mara G. Bloom, George Daniel Demetri, Phillip G. Febbo, William Goeckeler, Marc Ladanyi, Bryan Loy, Kate Murphy, Michael Nerenberg, Paul Papagni, Mark Robson, Robert W. Sweetman, Sean Tunis, Jessica DeMartino and Jonathan K. Larsen

Personalized medicine in oncology is maturing and evolving rapidly, and the use of molecular biomarkers in clinical decision-making is growing. This raises important issues regarding the safe, effective, and efficient deployment of molecular tests to guide appropriate care, specifically regarding laboratory-developed tests and companion diagnostics. In May 2011, NCCN assembled a work group composed of thought leaders from NCCN Member Institutions and other organizations to identify challenges and provide guidance regarding molecular testing in oncology and its corresponding utility from clinical, scientific, and coverage policy standpoints. The NCCN Molecular Testing Work Group identified challenges surrounding molecular testing, including health care provider knowledge, determining clinical utility, coding and billing for molecular tests, maintaining clinical and analytic validity of molecular tests, efficient use of specimens, and building clinical evidence.

Full access

Matthew H. Kulke, Manisha H. Shah, Al B. Benson III, Emily Bergsland, Jordan D. Berlin, Lawrence S. Blaszkowsky, Lyska Emerson, Paul F. Engstrom, Paul Fanta, Thomas Giordano, Whitney S. Goldner, Thorvardur R. Halfdanarson, Martin J. Heslin, Fouad Kandeel, Pamela L. Kunz, Boris W. Kuvshinoff II, Christopher Lieu, Jeffrey F. Moley, Gitonga Munene, Venu G. Pillarisetty, Leonard Saltz, Julie Ann Sosa, Jonathan R. Strosberg, Jean-Nicolas Vauthey, Christopher Wolfgang, James C. Yao, Jennifer Burns and Deborah Freedman-Cass

Neuroendocrine tumors (NETs) comprise a broad family of tumors that may or may not be associated with symptoms attributable to hormonal hypersecretion. The NCCN Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology for Neuroendocrine Tumors discuss the diagnosis and management of both sporadic and hereditary NETs. This selection from the guidelines focuses on sporadic NETs of the pancreas, gastrointestinal tract, lung, and thymus.

Full access

Paul F. Engstrom, Juan Pablo Arnoletti, Al B. Benson III, Jordan D. Berlin, J. Michael Berry, Yi-Jen Chen, Michael A. Choti, Harry S. Cooper, Raza A. Dilawari, Dayna S. Early, Peter C. Enzinger, Marwan G. Fakih, James Fleshman Jr., Charles Fuchs, Jean L. Grem, James A. Knol, Lucille A. Leong, Edward Lin, Mary F. Mulcahy, Eric Rohren, David P. Ryan, Leonard Saltz, David Shibata, John M. Skibber, William Small Jr., Constantinos Sofocleous, James Thomas, Alan P. Venook and Christopher Willett

Overview An estimated 5290 new cases (2100 men and 3190 women) of anal cancer (involving the anus, anal canal, or anorectum) will occur in the United States in 2009, accounting for approximately 1.9% of digestive system cancers, and an estimated 710 deaths due to anal cancer. Although considered to be a rare type of cancer, the incidence rate of invasive anal carcinoma in the United States increased by approximately 1.6-fold for men and 1.5-fold for women from 1973-1979 to 1994-2000 (see Risk Factors, facing page). This manuscript summarizes the NCCN Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology for managing squamous cell anal carcinoma, which represents the most common histologic form of the disease. Other types of cancers occurring in the anal region are addressed in other NCCN guidelines (i.e., anal adenocarcinoma and anal melanoma are managed according to the NCCN Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology on Rectal Cancer and Melanoma, respectively). Except where noted, the recommendations in these guidelines are classified as category 2A, meaning that uniform NCCN consensus was present among the panel based on lower-level evidence that the recommendation is appropriate. The panel unanimously endorses patient participation in a clinical trial over standard or accepted therapy. Risk Factors Anal carcinoma has been associated with human papilloma virus (HPV) infection (anal-genital warts); history of receptive anal intercourse or sexually transmitted disease; history of cervical, vulvar, or vaginal cancer; immunosuppression after solid organ transplantation or HIV infection; and smoking. Currently, the association between anal carcinoma and persistent infection with a high-risk form...
Full access

Paul F. Engstrom, Juan Pablo Arnoletti, Al B. Benson III, Yi-Jen Chen, Michael A. Choti, Harry S. Cooper, Anne Covey, Raza A. Dilawari, Dayna S. Early, Peter C. Enzinger, Marwan G. Fakih, James Fleshman Jr., Charles Fuchs, Jean L. Grem, Krystyna Kiel, James A. Knol, Lucille A. Leong, Edward Lin, Mary F. Mulcahy, Sujata Rao, David P. Ryan, Leonard Saltz, David Shibata, John M. Skibber, Constantinos Sofocleous, James Thomas, Alan P. Venook and Christopher Willett

Colon Cancer Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology NCCN Categories of Evidence and Consensus Category 1: The recommendation is based on high-level evidence (e.g., randomized controlled trials) and there is uniform NCCN consensus. Category 2A: The recommendation is based on lower-level evidence and there is uniform NCCN consensus. Category 2B: The recommendation is based on lower-level evidence and there is nonuniform NCCN consensus (but no major disagreement). Category 3: The recommendation is based on any level of evidence but reflects major disagreement. All recommendations are category 2A unless otherwise noted. Clinical trials: The NCCN believes that the best management for any cancer patient is in a clinical trial. Participation in clinical trials is especially encouraged. Overview Colorectal cancer is the fourth most frequently diagnosed cancer and the second leading cause of cancer death in the United States. In 2009, an estimated 106,100 new cases of colon and 40,870 cases of rectal cancer will occur. During the same year, it is estimated that 49,920 people will die from colon and rectal cancer.1 Despite these statistics, mortality from colon cancer has decreased slightly over the past 30 years, possibly due to earlier diagnosis through screening and better treatment modalities. This manuscript summarizes the NCCN Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology for managing colon cancer. The guidelines begin with clinical presentation to the primary care physician or gastroenterologist and address diagnosis, pathologic staging, surgical management, adjuvant treatment, management of recurrent and metastatic disease, and patient surveillance. When reviewing these guidelines, clinicians should be aware of...
Full access

Matthew H. Kulke, Al B. Benson III, Emily Bergsland, Jordan D. Berlin, Lawrence S. Blaszkowsky, Michael A. Choti, Orlo H. Clark, Gerard M. Doherty, James Eason, Lyska Emerson, Paul F. Engstrom, Whitney S. Goldner, Martin J. Heslin, Fouad Kandeel, Pamela L. Kunz, Boris W. Kuvshinoff II, Jeffrey F. Moley, Venu G. Pillarisetty, Leonard Saltz, David E. Schteingart, Manisha H. Shah, Stephen Shibata, Jonathan R. Strosberg, Jean-Nicolas Vauthey, Rebekah White, James C. Yao, Deborah A. Freedman-Cass and Mary A. Dwyer

Neuroendocrine tumors comprise a broad family of tumors, the most common of which are carcinoid and pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors. The NCCN Neuroendocrine Tumors Guidelines discuss the diagnosis and management of both sporadic and hereditary neuroendocrine tumors. Most of the recommendations pertain to well-differentiated, low- to intermediate-grade tumors. This updated version of the NCCN Guidelines includes a new section on pathology for diagnosis and reporting and revised recommendations for the surgical management of neuroendocrine tumors of the pancreas.