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Noopur S. Raje, Andrew J. Yee and G. David Roodman

As patients with multiple myeloma live longer, helping them live better through improvements in supportive care is equally as vital. Intrinsic to the disease are bone-related complications at presentation and over the course of illness. Bisphosphonates have been an important therapy for ameliorating the risk of skeletal-related events, and work is ongoing to determine their optimal schedule. Patients with multiple myeloma also encounter several challenges related to their treatment, including peripheral neuropathy, thrombotic complications, and infections. These challenges are being addressed through a better understanding of the risk factors for developing these complications and by mitigating these risks through better dosing schemas and prophylaxis.

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Jacob P. Laubach, Constantine S. Mitsiades, Anuj Mahindra, Marlise R. Luskin, Jacalyn Rosenblatt, Irene M. Ghobrial, Robert L. Schlossman, David Avigan, Noopur Raje, Nikhil C. Munshi, Kenneth C. Anderson and Paul G. Richardson

Despite significant progress in the treatment of multiple myeloma (MM) over the past decade, this disease remains incurable and almost all patients ultimately experience relapse and become refractory to treatment over time. However, the outlook for patients with relapsed MM has improved markedly with the use of the immunomodulatory drugs thalidomide and lenalidomide, and the proteasome inhibitor bortezomib. Moreover, the development of new drug classes based on preclinical rationale and the introduction of next-generation agents is likely to further expand treatment options and improve outcomes for relapsed MM.

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Jacob P. Laubach, Constantine S. Mitsiades, Anuj Mahindra, Robert L. Schlossman, Teru Hideshima, Dharminder Chauhan, Nicole A. Carreau, Irene M. Ghobrial, Noopur Raje, Nikhil C. Munshi, Kenneth C. Anderson and Paul G. Richardson

Multiple myeloma (MM) is a clonal B-cell malignancy characterized by aberrant expansion of plasma cells within bone marrow and extramedullary sites. In 2009, 20,580 new cases of MM and 10,580 deaths from the disease occurred in the United States. Treatment traditionally consists of systemic chemotherapy, with adjunctive use of radiation or surgery in selected cases associated with extramedullary disease. The therapeutic landscape in MM has changed markedly in the past decade with the introduction of the novel immunomodulatory agents thalidomide and lenalidomide, and the first-in-class proteasome inhibitor bortezomib. Although MM remains an incurable malignancy, new approaches to therapy incorporating these agents have produced significantly higher response rates and improved intervals of both progression-free and overall survival in the context of randomized, controlled trials. In aggregate, the use of novel therapies in MM has been associated with substantial improvements in patient outcome.

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Kenneth C. Anderson, Melissa Alsina, William Bensinger, J. Sybil Biermann, Asher Chanan-Khan, Adam D. Cohen, Steven Devine, Benjamin Djulbegovic, Cristina Gasparetto, Carol Ann Huff, Madan Jagasia, Bruno C. Medeiros, Ruby Meredith, Noopur Raje, Jeffrey Schriber, Seema Singhal, George Somlo, Keith Stockerl-Goldstein, Guido Tricot, Julie M. Vose, Donna Weber, Joachim Yahalom and Furhan Yunus

Multiple Myeloma Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology NCCN Categories of Evidence and Consensus Category 1: The recommendation is based on high-level evidence (e.g., randomized controlled trials) and there is uniform NCCN consensus. Category 2A: The recommendation is based on lower-level evidence and there is uniform NCCN consensus. Category 2B: The recommendation is based on lower-level evidence and there is nonuniform NCCN consensus (but no major disagreement). Category 3: The recommendation is based on any level of evidence but reflects major disagreement. All recommendations are category 2A unless otherwise noted. Clinical trials: The NCCN believes that the best management for any cancer patient is in a clinical trial. Participation in clinical trials is especially encouraged. Overview Multiple myeloma (MM) is a malignant neoplasm of plasma cells that accumulate in bone marrow, leading to bone destruction and marrow failure. The American Cancer Society estimates that 20,580 new cases of MM will occur in the United States in 2009, including 11,680 in men and 8900 in women, with an estimated 10,580 deaths.1 The mean age of affected individuals is 62 years for men (75% > 70 years) and 61 years for women (79% > 70 years). The treatment of MM has dramatically improved over the past decade. The 5-year survival rate reported in the Surveillance Epidemiology and End Results database has increased from 25% in 1975 to 34% in 2003 because of the availability of newer and more effective treatment options.2,3 MM is typically sensitive to various cytotoxic drugs, both as initial treatment...
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Kenneth C. Anderson, Melissa Alsina, Djordje Atanackovic, J. Sybil Biermann, Jason C. Chandler, Caitlin Costello, Benjamin Djulbegovic, Henry C. Fung, Cristina Gasparetto, Kelly Godby, Craig Hofmeister, Leona Holmberg, Sarah Holstein, Carol Ann Huff, Adetola Kassim, Amrita Y. Krishnan, Shaji K. Kumar, Michaela Liedtke, Matthew Lunning, Noopur Raje, Seema Singhal, Clayton Smith, George Somlo, Keith Stockerl-Goldstein, Steven P. Treon, Donna Weber, Joachim Yahalom, Dorothy A. Shead and Rashmi Kumar

Multiple myeloma (MM) is a malignant neoplasm of plasma cells that accumulate in bone marrow, leading to bone destruction and marrow failure. Recent statistics from the American Cancer Society indicate that the incidence of MM is increasing. The NCCN Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology (NCCN Guidelines) included in this issue address management of patients with solitary plasmacytoma and newly diagnosed MM.

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Shaji K. Kumar, Natalie S. Callander, Melissa Alsina, Djordje Atanackovic, J. Sybil Biermann, Jason C. Chandler, Caitlin Costello, Matthew Faiman, Henry C. Fung, Cristina Gasparetto, Kelly Godby, Craig Hofmeister, Leona Holmberg, Sarah Holstein, Carol Ann Huff, Adetola Kassim, Michaela Liedtke, Thomas Martin, James Omel, Noopur Raje, Frederic J. Reu, Seema Singhal, George Somlo, Keith Stockerl-Goldstein, Steven P. Treon, Donna Weber, Joachim Yahalom, Dorothy A. Shead and Rashmi Kumar

Multiple myeloma (MM) is caused by the neoplastic proliferation of plasma cells. These neoplastic plasma cells proliferate and produce monoclonal immunoglobulin in the bone marrow causing skeletal damage, a hallmark of multiple myeloma. Other MM-related complications include hypercalcemia, renal insufficiency, anemia, and infections. The NCCN Multiple Myeloma Panel members have developed guidelines for the management of patients with various plasma cell dyscrasias, including solitary plasmacytoma, smoldering myeloma, multiple myeloma, systemic light chain amyloidosis, and Waldenström's macroglobulinemia. The recommendations specific to the diagnosis and treatment of patients with newly diagnosed MM are discussed in this article.

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Kenneth C. Anderson, Melissa Alsina, William Bensinger, J. Sybil Biermann, Asher Chanan-Khan, Adam D. Cohen, Steven Devine, Benjamin Djulbegovic, Edward A. Faber Jr., Cristina Gasparetto, Carol Ann Huff, Adetola Kassim, Bruno C. Medeiros, Ruby Meredith, Noopur Raje, Jeffrey Schriber, Seema Singhal, George Somlo, Keith Stockerl-Goldstein, Steven P. Treon, Guido Tricot, Donna M. Weber, Joachim Yahalom and Furhan Yunus

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Kenneth C. Anderson, Melissa Alsina, Djordje Atanackovic, J. Sybil Biermann, Jason C. Chandler, Caitlin Costello, Benjamin Djulbegovic, Henry C. Fung, Cristina Gasparetto, Kelly Godby, Craig Hofmeister, Leona Holmberg, Sarah Holstein, Carol Ann Huff, Adetola Kassim, Amrita Y. Krishnan, Shaji K. Kumar, Michaela Liedtke, Matthew Lunning, Noopur Raje, Frederic J. Reu, Seema Singhal, George Somlo, Keith Stockerl-Goldstein, Steven P. Treon, Donna Weber, Joachim Yahalom, Dorothy A. Shead and Rashmi Kumar

These NCCN Guidelines Insights highlight the important updates/changes specific to the 2016 version of the NCCN Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology for Multiple Myeloma. These changes include updated recommendations to the overall management of multiple myeloma from diagnosis and staging to new treatment options.

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Kenneth C. Anderson, Melissa Alsina, William Bensinger, J. Sybil Biermann, Adam D. Cohen, Steven Devine, Benjamin Djulbegovic, Edward A. Faber Jr, Christine Gasparetto, Francisco Hernandez-Ilizaliturri, Carol Ann Huff, Adetola Kassim, Amrita Y. Krishnan, Bruno C. Medeiros, Ruby Meredith, Noopur Raje, Jeffrey Schriber, Seema Singhal, George Somlo, Keith Stockerl-Goldstein, Steven P. Treon, Guido Tricot, Donna M. Weber, Joachim Yahalom, Furhan Yunus, Rashmi Kumar and Dorothy A. Shead

These NCCN Guidelines Insights highlight the important updates/changes specific to the management of Waldenström’s Macroglobulinemia/Lymphoplasmacytic Lymphoma. These include the addition of regimens containing novel agents as primary and salvage therapy options, inclusion of the updated summary of response categories and criteria from the sixth international workshop on Waldenström’s Macroglobulinemia, and a section on management of peripheral neuropathy in the accompanying discussion.

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Kenneth C. Anderson, Melissa Alsina, William Bensinger, J. Sybil Biermann, Adam D. Cohen, Steven Devine, Benjamin Djulbegovic, Edward A. Faber Jr, Cristina Gasparetto, Francisco Hernandez-Illizaliturri, Carol Ann Huff, Adetola Kassim, Amrita Y. Krishnan, Michael Liedtke, Ruby Meredith, Noopur Raje, Jeffrey Schriber, Seema Singhal, George Somlo, Keith Stockerl-Goldstein, Steven P. Treon, Donna Weber, Joachim Yahalom, Furhan Yunus, Dorothy A. Shead and Rashmi Kumar

These NCCN Guidelines Insights highlight the important updates/changes specific to the management of relapsed or progressive disease in the 2013 version of the NCCN Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology for Multiple Myeloma. These changes include the addition of new regimens as options for salvage therapy and strategies to mitigate the adverse effects and risks associated with newer regimens for the treatment of multiple myeloma.