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Nina D. Wagner-Johnston and Nancy L. Bartlett

Patients with lymphoma commonly undergo routine imaging studies after treatment completion, yet the appropriate interval, duration, and modality of follow-up, and the overall efficacy of various approaches is unclear. Existing guidelines are vague and not evidence-based, and consequently, practice patterns are varied. Most surveillance approaches in lymphoma have focused on early detection of recurrence, with the hope of prolonged survival and potential cure. Concerns regarding the prognostic value of frequent scanning, cost-effectiveness, and long-term risks associated with prolonged radiation exposure have led many to question the role of routine imaging in this setting. Given the multiple lymphoma subtypes and the clinical heterogeneity of these entities, a single approach to follow-up may not be reasonable. Much of the available literature focuses on Hodgkin lymphoma, and may not be generalizable. Retrospective series show that most relapses are detected by signs and symptoms regardless of the imaging schedule. In summary, clinicians are still left with “expert opinion” to guide them. This article examines the available data outlining the role of surveillance imaging in lymphoma.

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Armin Rashidi and Nancy L. Bartlett

The advent of biologic approaches for the treatment of solid tumors and hematologic malignancies has been a major accomplishment in oncology and a rapidly growing field of clinical and translational research in cancer therapeutics. Classical Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) is no exception. Although the investigation of biologic therapies in HL started decades ago, it has only recently flourished, largely because of the development of new monoclonal antibody drug conjugates and checkpoint inhibitors. Biologic therapies represent a potent treatment option that have produced durable remissions even in patients who have had multiple relapses or with refractory disease. This article reviews 8 major classes of biologic approaches that have been investigated in HL: monoclonal antibodies, immunotoxins, antibody-drug conjugates, radioimmunotherapy, adoptive immunotherapy, immunomodulators, chimeric antigen receptor T cells, and checkpoint inhibitors. An armamentarium of biologic therapies for HL that are well tolerated and potentially more effective is expected to be available in the near future.

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Ndiya Ogba, Nicole M. Arwood, Nancy L. Bartlett, Mara Bloom, Patrick Brown, Christine Brown, Elizabeth Lihua Budde, Robert Carlson, Stephanie Farnia, Terry J. Fry, Morgan Garber, Rebecca A. Gardner, Lauren Gurschick, Patricia Kropf, Jeff J. Reitan, Craig Sauter, Bijal Shah, Elizabeth J. Shpall and Steven T. Rosen

Patients with relapsed or refractory (R/R) cancers have a poor prognosis and limited treatment options. The recent approval of 2 chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) autologous T-cell products for R/R B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma treatment is setting the stage for what is possible in other diseases. However, there are important factors that must be considered, including patient selection, toxicity management, and costs associated with CAR T-cell therapy. To begin to address these issues, NCCN organized a task force consisting of a multidisciplinary panel of experts in oncology, cancer center administration, and health policy, which met for the first time in March 2018. This report describes the current state of CAR T-cell therapy and future strategies that should be considered as the application of this novel immunotherapy expands and evolves.

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NCCN Guidelines Insights: B-Cell Lymphomas, Version 3.2019

Featured Updates to the NCCN Guidelines

Andrew D. Zelenetz, Leo I. Gordon, Jeremy S. Abramson, Ranjana H. Advani, Nancy L. Bartlett, Paolo F. Caimi, Julie E. Chang, Julio C. Chavez, Beth Christian, Luis E. Fayad, Martha J. Glenn, Thomas M. Habermann, Nancy Lee Harris, Francisco Hernandez-Ilizaliturri, Mark S. Kaminski, Christopher R. Kelsey, Nadia Khan, Susan Krivacic, Ann S. LaCasce, Amitkumar Mehta, Auayporn Nademanee, Rachel Rabinovitch, Nishitha Reddy, Erin Reid, Kenneth B. Roberts, Stephen D. Smith, Erin D. Snyder, Lode J. Swinnen, Julie M. Vose, Mary A. Dwyer and Hema Sundar

Diffuse large B-cell lymphomas (DLBCLs) and follicular lymphoma (FL) are the most common subtypes of B-cell non-Hodgkin’s lymphomas in adults. Histologic transformation of FL to DLBCL (TFL) occurs in approximately 15% of patients and is generally associated with a poor clinical outcome. Phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) inhibitors have shown promising results in the treatment of relapsed/refractory FL. CAR T-cell therapy (axicabtagene ciloleucel and tisagenlecleucel) has emerged as a novel treatment option for relapsed/refractory DLBCL and TFL. These NCCN Guidelines Insights highlight important updates to the NCCN Guidelines for B-Cell Lymphomas regarding the treatment of TFL and relapsed/refractory FL and DLBCL.