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  • Author: Mojtaba Akhtari x
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Vijaya Raj Bhatt, Mojtaba Akhtari, R. Gregory Bociek, Jennifer N. Sanmann, Ji Yuan, Bhavana J. Dave, Warren G. Sanger, Anne Kessinger and James O. Armitage

Philadelphia chromosome-positive acute myeloid leukemia (Ph+-AML) has a poor response to anthracycline- and cytarabine-containing regimens, high relapse rate, and dismal prognosis. Although therapy with imatinib and allogeneic stem cell transplantation (allo-SCT) is promising, relatively short follow-up limits understanding of long-term results of these therapies. This report describes the outcomes of 3 cases of Ph+-AML diagnosed and transplanted at the University of Nebraska Medical Center between 2004 and 2011. These patients, young and without major comorbidities, received induction therapy with 7 days of cytarabine and 3 days of idarubicin along with imatinib and consolidation therapy with high-dose cytarabine (with or without imatinib). All patients underwent 10/10 HLA-matched peripheral blood allo-SCT (sibling donor for first and third patients and unrelated donor for the second patient; all had acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD), and the first and third patients had chronic GVHD. All patients are currently alive and experiencing complete remission at 116, 113, and 28 months after diagnosis, respectively. This report shows that the use of allo-SCT with resultant graft-versus-leukemia effect and the addition of imatinib can result in long-term remission and possible cure in some patients with Ph+-AML.

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Susan O'Brien, Camille N. Abboud, Mojtaba Akhtari, Jessica Altman, Ellin Berman, Daniel J. DeAngelo, Steven Devine, Amir T. Fathi, Jason Gotlib, Madan Jagasia, Joseph O. Moore, Javier Pinilla-Ibarz, Jerald P. Radich, Vishnu V.B. Reddy, Neil P. Shah, Paul J. Shami, B. Douglas Smith, David S. Snyder, Meir Wetzler and Furhan Yunus

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Susan O’Brien, Jerald P. Radich, Camille N. Abboud, Mojtaba Akhtari, Jessica K. Altman, Ellin Berman, Peter Curtin, Daniel J. DeAngelo, Michael Deininger, Steven Devine, Amir T. Fathi, Jason Gotlib, Madan Jagasia, Patricia Kropf, Joseph O. Moore, Arnel Pallera, Vishnu VB. Reddy, Neil P. Shah, B. Douglas Smith, David S. Snyder, Meir Wetzler, Kristina Gregory and Hema Sundar

Chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) is usually diagnosed in the chronic phase. Untreated chronic phase CML will eventually progress to advanced phase (accelerated or blast phase) CML. Tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) have been shown to induce favorable response rates in patients with accelerated and blast phase CML. The addition of TKIs to chemotherapy has also been associated with improved outcomes in patients with blast phase CML. Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant remains a potentially curative option for patients with advanced phase CML, although treatment with a course of TKIs will be beneficial as a bridge to transplant. This manuscript discusses the recommendations outlined in the NCCN Guidelines for the diagnosis and management of patients with advanced phase CML.

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Susan O’Brien, Jerald P. Radich, Camille N. Abboud, Mojtaba Akhtari, Jessica K. Altman, Ellin Berman, Daniel J. DeAngelo, Michael Deininger, Steven Devine, Amir T. Fathi, Jason Gotlib, Madan Jagasia, Patricia Kropf, Joseph O. Moore, Arnel Pallera, Javier Pinilla-Ibarz, Vishnu VB. Reddy, Neil P. Shah, B. Douglas Smith, David S. Snyder, Meir Wetzler, Kristina Gregory and Hema Sundar

The 2014 NCCN Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology for Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia recommend quantitative reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (QPCR) standardized to International Scale (IS) as the preferred method for monitoring molecular response to tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) therapy. A BCR-ABL1 transcript level of 10% or less (IS) is now included as the response milestone at 3 and 6 months. Change of therapy to an alternate TKI is recommended for patients with BCR-ABL1 transcript levels greater than 10% (IS) at 3 months after primary treatment with imatinib. Continuing the same dose of TKI or switching to an alternate TKI are options for patients with BCR-ABL1 transcript levels greater than 10% (IS) at 3 months after primary treatment with dasatinib or nilotinib. The guidelines recommend 6-month evaluation with QPCR (IS) for patients with BCR-ABL1 transcript levels greater than 10% at 3 months. Monitoring with QPCR (IS) every 3 months is recommended for all patients, including those who meet response milestones at 3, 6, 12, and 18 months (BCR-ABL1 transcript level ≤10% [IS] at 3 and 6 months, complete cytogenetic response at 12 and 18 months).