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Michael D. Green and James A. Hayman

The management of Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC) requires multidisciplinary care for optimal patient outcomes. Radiotherapy (RT) is most commonly used as adjuvant therapy to improve locoregional control in patients with MCC who undergo surgery. Additionally, it can sometimes be used as definitive monotherapy for patients who decline or are not candidates for surgery and as palliative treatment in those with metastatic MCC. This article discusses the indications, treatment considerations, and recommended dose prescriptions for RT in the management of early- and advanced-stage disease. Considerable hope exists that immunotherapy advances will synergize with RT to further enhance clinical outcomes.

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Thomas A. D’Amico, Lindsey A.M. Bandini, Alan Balch, Al B. Benson III, Stephen B. Edge, C. Lyn Fitzgerald, Robert J. Green, Wui-Jin Koh, Michael Kolodziej, Shaji Kumar, Neal J. Meropol, James L. Mohler, David Pfister, Ronald S. Walters and Robert W. Carlson

Although oncology care has evolved, outcome assessment remains a key challenge. Outcome measurement requires identification and adoption of a succinct list of metrics indicative of high-quality cancer care for use within and across healthcare systems. NCCN established an advisory committee, the NCCN Quality and Outcomes Committee, consisting of provider experts from NCCN Member Institutions and other stakeholders, including payers and patient advocacy, community oncology, and health information technology representatives, to review the existing quality landscape and identify contemporary, relevant cancer quality and outcomes measures by reevaluating validated measures for endorsement and proposing new measure concepts to fill crucial gaps. This manuscript reports on 22 measures and concepts; 15 that align with existing measures and 7 that are new.

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Angel Qin, Songzhu Zhao, Abdul Miah, Lai Wei, Sandipkumar Patel, Andrew Johns, Madison Grogan, Erin M. Bertino, Kai He, Peter G. Shields, Gregory P. Kalemkerian, Shirish M. Gadgeel, Nithya Ramnath, Bryan J. Schneider, Khaled A. Hassan, Nicholas Szerlip, Zoey Chopra, Sara Journey, Jessica Waninger, Daniel Spakowicz, David P. Carbone, Carolyn J. Presley, Gregory A. Otterson, Michael D. Green and Dwight H. Owen

Background: Bone metastases and skeletal-related events (SREs) are a frequent cause of morbidity in patients with metastatic non–small cell lung cancer (mNSCLC). Data are limited on bone metastases and SREs in patients with mNSCLC treated using immune checkpoint inhibitors (ICIs), and on the efficacy of bone-modifying agents (BMAs) in this setting. Here we report the incidence, impact on survival, risk factors for bone metastases and SREs, and impact of BMAs in patients with mNSCLC treated with ICIs in a multi-institutional cohort. Patients and Methods: We conducted a retrospective study of patients with mNSCLC treated with ICIs at 2 tertiary care centers from 2014 through 2017. Overall survival (OS) was compared between patients with and without baseline bone metastases using a log-rank test. A Cox regression model was used to evaluate the association between OS and the presence of bone metastases at ICI initiation, controlling for other confounding factors. Results: We identified a cohort of 330 patients who had received ICIs for metastatic disease. Median patient age was 63 years, most patients were treated in the second line or beyond (n=259; 78%), and nivolumab was the most common ICI (n=211; 64%). Median OS was 10 months (95% CI, 8.4–12.0). In our cohort, 124 patients (38%) had baseline bone metastases, and 43 (13%) developed SREs during or after ICI treatment. Patients with bone metastases had a higher hazard of death after controlling for performance status, histology, line of therapy, and disease burden (hazard ratio, 1.57; 95% CI, 1.19–2.08; P=.001). Use of BMAs was not associated with OS or a decreased risk of SREs. Conclusions: Presence of bone metastases at baseline was associated with a worse prognosis for patients with mNSCLC treated with ICI after controlling for multiple clinical characteristics. Use of BMAs was not associated with reduced SREs or a difference in survival.