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Michael B. Streiff

Venous thromboembolism (VTE) is a common complication in cancer patients that results in significant morbidity and mortality. Long-term treatment options for cancer patients who experience VTE include vitamin K antagonists (VKAs), low molecular weight heparins (LMWHs), and inferior vena caval (IVC) filters. Cancer patients have a two- to fourfold higher risk for experiencing recurrent VTE and major bleeding during chronic VKA therapy than patients without malignancies. Recent randomized clinical trials have shown that LMWHs rather than oral VKAs are preferred for initial chronic treatment of VTE in patients with advanced cancer. One factor potentially limiting the broader use of LMWH for chronic therapy in the United States is its higher acquisition cost. Efficacy, cost, drug availability, patient comorbidities, and concomitant medications all need to be considered when selecting chronic VTE therapy. Cancer patients with VTE should be treated for as long as their disease is active to minimize the incidence of recurrence. Use of IVC filters should generally be reserved for patients at high risk for recurrent VTE who have contraindications to anticoagulation. Several new anticoagulants are being investigated that promise greater therapeutic choices and potentially better outcomes for cancer patients with VTE.

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Michael B. Streiff

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Elizabeth M. Kander, Alison R. Moliterno, Alfred Rademaker, Michael B. Streiff, Jerry L. Spivak and Brady L. Stein

Polycythemia vera (PV) is an acquired clonal hematopoietic stem cell disorder characterized by an overproduction of red blood cells, white blood cells, and platelets; thrombotic and hemorrhagic complications; and an increased risk of transformation to myelofibrosis and acute leukemia. In 1967, the Polycythemia Vera Study Group proposed the optimal approach to diagnosis and treatment of PV, and in 2002, investigators from Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine surveyed the practice patterns of hematologists as they pertained to PV. Since this survey, the JAK2 V617F mutation was discovered, leading to a new era of discovery in the disease pathogenesis, diagnosis, and classification and treatment of PV. Our objective was to survey hematologists in the diagnosis and treatment of PV in the modern, post-JAK2 V617F discovery era. An anonymous 17-question survey was emailed to members of the Myeloproliferative Neoplasm (MPN) Research Foundation database and Aplastic Anemia and MDS International Foundation. A total of 71 surveys were used in the analysis. Diagnostic testing varied according to the respondent's clinical experience and practice type. In addition, there were marked differences in target hematocrit and platelet count among those surveyed. There continue to be variations in diagnosis and treatment of PV despite WHO guidelines and the JAK2 discovery. US-based guidelines for MPNs are needed to create consistency in the management of PV and other MPNs.

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Michael B. Streiff, Paula L. Bockenstedt, Spero R. Cataland, Carolyn Chesney, Charles Eby, John Fanikos, Annemarie E. Fogerty, Shuwei Gao, Samuel Z. Goldhaber, Hani Hassoun, Paul Hendrie, Bjorn Holmstrom, Nicole Kuderer, Jason T. Lee, Michael M. Millenson, Anne T. Neff, Thomas L. Ortel, Tanya Siddiqi, Judy L. Smith, Gary C. Yee, Anaadriana Zakarija, Nicole McMillian and Maoko Naganuma

Venous thromboembolism (VTE) remains a common and life-threatening complication among patients with cancer. Thromboprophylaxis can be used to prevent the occurrence of VTE in patients with cancer who are considered at high risk for developing this complication. Therefore, it is critical to recognize the various risk factors for VTE in patients with cancer. Risk assessment tools are available to help identify patients for whom discussions regarding the potential benefits and risks of thromboprophylaxis would be appropriate. The NCCN Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology for VTE provide recommendations on risk evaluation, diagnosis, prevention, and treatment of VTE in patients with cancer.

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Michael B. Streiff, Paula L. Bockenstedt, Spero R. Cataland, Carolyn Chesney, Charles Eby, John Fanikos, Patrick F. Fogarty, Shuwei Gao, Julio Garcia-Aguilar, Samuel Z. Goldhaber, Hani Hassoun, Paul Hendrie, Bjorn Holmstrom, Kimberly A. Jones, Nicole Kuderer, Jason T. Lee, Michael M. Millenson, Anne T. Neff, Thomas L. Ortel, Judy L. Smith, Gary C. Yee and Anaadriana Zakarija

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Michael B. Streiff, Bjorn Holmstrom, Aneel Ashrani, Paula L. Bockenstedt, Carolyn Chesney, Charles Eby, John Fanikos, Randolph B. Fenninger, Annemarie E. Fogerty, Shuwei Gao, Samuel Z. Goldhaber, Paul Hendrie, Nicole Kuderer, Alfred Lee, Jason T. Lee, Mirjana Lovrincevic, Michael M. Millenson, Anne T. Neff, Thomas L. Ortel, Rita Paschal, Sanford Shattil, Tanya Siddiqi, Kristi J. Smock, Gerald Soff, Tzu-Fei Wang, Gary C. Yee, Anaadriana Zakarija, Nicole McMillian and Anita M. Engh

The NCCN Guidelines for Cancer-Associated Venous Thromboembolic Disease outline strategies for treatment and prevention of venous thromboembolism (VTE) in adult patients with a diagnosis of cancer or for whom cancer is clinically suspected. VTE is a common complication in patients with cancer, which places them at greater risk for morbidity and mortality. Therefore, risk-appropriate prophylaxis is an essential component for the optimal care of inpatients and outpatients with cancer. Critical to meeting this goal is ensuring that patients get the most effective medication in the correct dose. Body weight has a significant impact on blood volume and drug clearance. Because obesity is a common health problem in industrialized societies, cancer care providers are increasingly likely to treat obese patients in their practice. Obesity is a risk factor common to VTE and many cancers, and may also impact the anticoagulant dose needed for safe and effective prophylaxis. These NCCN Guidelines Insights summarize the data supporting new dosing recommendations for VTE prophylaxis in obese patients with cancer.

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Michael B. Streiff, Bjorn Holmstrom, Dana Angelini, Aneel Ashrani, Paula L. Bockenstedt, Carolyn Chesney, John Fanikos, Randolph B. Fenninger, Annemarie E. Fogerty, Shuwei Gao, Samuel Z. Goldhaber, Krishna Gundabolu, Paul Hendrie, Alfred I. Lee, Jason T. Lee, Janelle Mann, Brandon McMahon, Michael M. Millenson, Colleen Morton, Thomas L. Ortel, Sadat Ozair, Rita Paschal, Sanford Shattil, Tanya Siddiqi, Kristi J. Smock, Gerald Soff, Tzu-Fei Wang, Eliot Williams, Anaadriana Zakarija, Lydia Hammond, Mary A. Dwyer and Anita M. Engh

Venous thromboembolism (VTE) is common in patients with cancer and increases morbidity and mortality. VTE prevention and treatment are more complex in patients with cancer. The NCCN Guidelines for Cancer-Associated Venous Thromboembolic Disease outline strategies for treatment and prevention of VTE in adult patients diagnosed with cancer or in whom cancer is clinically suspected. These NCCN Guidelines Insights explain recent changes in anticoagulants recommended for the treatment of cancer-associated VTE.