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Tiffany H. Svahn, Joyce C. Niland, Robert W. Carlson, Melissa E. Hughes, Rebecca A. Ottesen, Richard L. Theriault, Stephen B. Edge, Anne F. Schott, Michael A. Bookman and Jane C. Weeks

After the first report of the ATAC (Arimidex, Tamoxifen, Alone or in Combination) trial, adjuvant aromatase inhibitor use increased rapidly among National Comprehensive Cancer Network member institutions. Increased aromatase inhibitor use was associated with older age, vascular disease, overexpression of human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2), or more advanced stage, and substantial variation was seen among institutions. This article examines adjuvant endocrine therapy in postmenopausal women after the first report of the trial, identifies temporal relationships in aromatase inhibitor use, and examines characteristics associated with choice of endocrine therapy among 4044 postmenopausal patients with hormone receptor–positive nonmetastatic breast cancer presenting from July 1997 to December 2004. Multivariable logistic regression analysis examined temporal associations and characteristics associated with aromatase inhibitor use. Time-trend analysis showed increased aromatase inhibitor and decreased tamoxifen use after release of ATAC results (P < .0001). In multivariable regression analysis, institution (P <. 0001), vascular disease (P <. 0001), age (P = .0002), stage (P = .0002), and HER2 status (P = .0009) independently predicted aromatase inhibitor use. Institutional rates of use ranged from 15% to 66%. Adjuvant aromatase inhibitor use increased after the first report of ATAC, with this increase associated with older age, vascular disease, overexpression of HER2, or more advanced stage. Substantial variation was seen among institutions.

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Benjamin E. Greer, Wui-Jin Koh, Nadeem Abu-Rustum, Michael A. Bookman, Robert E. Bristow, Susana M. Campos, Kathleen R. Cho, Larry Copeland, Marta Ann Crispens, Patricia J. Eifel, Warner K. Huh, Wainwright Jaggernauth, Daniel S. Kapp, John J. Kavanagh, John R. Lurain III, Mark Morgan, Robert J. Morgan Jr, C. Bethan Powell, Steven W. Remmenga, R. Kevin Reynolds, Angeles Alvarez Secord, William Small Jr and Nelson Teng

Uterine Neoplasms Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology NCCN Categories of Evidence and Consensus Category 1: The recommendation is based on high-level evidence (e.g., randomized controlled trials) and there is uniform NCCN consensus. Category 2A: The recommendation is based on lowerlevel evidence and there is uniform NCCN consensus. Category 2B: The recommendation is based on lowerlevel evidence and there is nonuniform NCCN consensus (but no major disagreement). Category 3: The recommendation is based on any level of evidence but reflects major disagreement. All recommendations are category 2A unless otherwise noted. Clinical trials: The NCCN believes that the best management for any cancer patient is in a clinical trial. Participation in clinical trials is especially encouraged. Overview Adenocarcinoma of the endometrium is the most common malignancy in the female genital tract in the United States. An estimated 40,100 new diagnoses of uterine cancer and 7470 deaths from this disease will occur in 2008.1 Uterine sarcomas are uncommon and account for approximately 1 in 12 of all uterine cancers.2 These guidelines describe epithelial carcinomas and uterine sarcomas; each of these major categories contains specific histologic groups that require different management (see page 500). By definition, these guidelines cannot incorporate all possible clinical variations and are not intended to replace good clinical judgment or individualization of treatments. Exceptions to the rule were discussed among panel members during the process of developing these guidelines. For patients with suspected uterine neoplasms, initial preoperative evaluation includes a history and physical examination, endometrial biopsy, chest radiograph, a CBC,...