Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 4 of 4 items for

  • Author: Meng-Shiou Shieh x
Clear All Modify Search
Full access

Kah Poh Loh, Ankit Kansagra, Meng-Shiou Shieh, Penelope Pekow, Peter Lindenauer, Mihaela Stefan and Tara Lagu

Background: In-hospital mortality is high for critically ill patients with metastatic cancer. To help patients, families, and clinicians make an informed decision about invasive medical treatments, we examined predictors of in-hospital mortality among patients with metastatic cancer who received critical care therapies (CCTs). Patients and Methods: We used the 2010 California Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project: State Inpatient Databases to identify admissions of patients with metastatic cancer (age ≥18 years) who received CCTs, including invasive mechanical ventilation (IMV), tracheostomy, percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG) tube, acute use of dialysis, and total parenteral nutrition (TPN). We first described the characteristics and outcomes of patients who received any CCTs. We then used multivariable logistic regression models with generalized estimating equations (to account for clustering within hospitals) to identify predictors of in-hospital mortality among patients who received any CCTs. Results: For 2010, we identified 99,085 admissions among patients with metastatic cancer. Of these, 9,348 (9.4%) received any CCT during hospitalization; 50% received IMV, 15% PEG tube, 8% tracheostomy, 40% TPN, and 8% acute dialysis. Inpatient mortality was 30%. Of patients who received any CCT and survived to discharge, 27% were discharged to a skilled nursing facility. Compared with patients who died, costs of care were $3,019 higher for admissions in which patients survived the hospitalization. Predictors of in-hospital mortality included non-white race (vs whites), lack of insurance (vs Medicare), unscheduled admissions, principal diagnosis of infections (vs cancer-related), greater burden of comorbidities, end-stage renal disease, liver disease and lung cancer (vs other cancers). Conclusions: Although more studies are needed to better understand risks and benefits of specific treatments in the setting of specific cancer types, these data will help to inform decision-making for patients with metastatic cancer who become critically ill.

Full access

Kah Poh Loh, Ankit Kansagra, Meng-Shiou Shieh, Penelope Pekow, Peter Lindenauer, Mihaela Stefan and Tara Lagu

Objective: Understanding which factors are associated with the use of critical care therapies (CCTs) can help with clinical decision-making and goals of care discussion. The goal of this study was to describe the predictors of CCT use (eg, mechanical ventilation, tracheostomy, percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy tube, total parenteral nutrition, acute use of dialysis) in hospitalized patients with metastatic cancer. Methods: We used the 2010 California State Inpatient Databases sponsored by the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality to identify all hospitalizations with a diagnosis of metastatic cancer (patients aged ≥18 years). We examined the predictors of any CCT use (and invasive mechanical ventilation [IMV] use), stratified by do-not-resuscitate (DNR) status, using multivariable logistic regression models. Results: We identified 99,085 hospitalizations involving patients with metastatic cancer; 9.4% received any CCTs and 4.7% received IMV. Predictors of CCT use in the no-DNR group included principal diagnosis of infections (vs cancer-related), greater burden of comorbidities, and presence of weight loss. Predictors of CCT use in the DNR group were similar, but also included non-white races. Liver disease was also a predictor of IMV use in the no-DNR group. Patients with metastatic lung cancer (vs breast and genitourinary) with no DNR were more likely to receive CCT (and IMV). Conclusions: Higher burden of comorbidities, weight loss, liver disease, lung cancer subtype, and diagnosis of infections were associated with higher odds of receiving CCTs or IMV. These findings may help clinicians determine in whom to prioritize discussions around goals of care, especially in the group without a DNR status.

Full access

Arjun Gupta

Full access

Kah Poh Loh, Maya Abdallah, Meng-Shiou Shieh, Mihaela S. Stefan, Penelope S. Pekow, Peter K. Lindenauer, Supriya G. Mohile, Dilip Babu and Tara Lagu

Background: Invasive mechanical ventilation (IMV), dialysis for acute kidney failure, and other critical care therapies (CCTs) are associated with a high risk for complications in patients with metastatic cancer. Inpatient palliative care (IPC) can assist in assessing patients' preferences for life-prolonging treatment at the end of life. This study investigated the use pattern of IPC, outcomes (in-hospital mortality, length of stay [LOS], discharge destination, and cost of care), and predictors of IPC use in patients with metastatic cancer who received CCTs. We hypothesized that IPC services are underused in this cohort. Methods: In this retrospective cohort study, we used the 2010 California State Inpatient Databases to identify adults with metastatic cancer who received CCTs that are common and reliably coded (IMV, tracheostomy, percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy tube, dialysis for acute kidney failure, and total parenteral nutrition). We determined IPC use in all patients, in those who received IMV, and across 4 cancer subtypes (lung, breast, colorectal, and genitourinary). Outcomes were assessed based on IPC use. Multivariable analyses were used to investigate factors associated with IPC use. Results: We identified 5,862 hospitalizations, 19.8% of which used IPC services. IPC use varied across cancer subtypes (lung, 28.3%; breast, 22.4%; colorectal, 12.8%; genitourinary, 16.1%; P<.01). Patients who received and did not receive IPC services had high in-hospital mortality rates (63.9% and 29.8%, respectively), and costs of care and LOS were lower in survivors who received IPC compared with those who did not. Predictors of IPC use were lung cancer (vs colorectal or genitourinary cancer), higher comorbidity score, do-not-resuscitate status on admission or within 24 hours of admission, infections (vs cancer-related diagnoses), and higher hospital bed count. Conclusions: Use of IPC was low in the cohort who received CCTs with poor outcomes, although data on outpatient palliative care services is lacking. Predictors of IPC use may be used to identify patients who may benefit from these services.