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First-Line Systemic Therapy Practice Patterns and Concordance With NCCN Guidelines for Patients Diagnosed With Metastatic NSCLC Treated at NCCN Institutions

Carrie Zornosa, Jonathan L. Vandergrift, Gregory P. Kalemkerian, David S. Ettinger, Michael S. Rabin, Mary Reid, Gregory A. Otterson, Marianna Koczywas, Thomas A. D'Amico, Joyce C. Niland, Rizvan Mamet, and Katherine M. Pisters

The NCCN Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology (NCCN Guidelines) allow many systemic therapy options for patients with metastatic non–small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). This analysis uses the NCCN NSCLC Outcomes Database to report on first-line therapy practice patterns and concordance with NCCN Guidelines. The analysis was limited to patients diagnosed with metastatic NSCLC between September 2006 and November 2009 at 1 of 8 participating NCCN Member Institutions. Patient characteristics, regimens used, and guidelines concordance were analyzed. Institutional variation and changes in practice over time were also measured. A total of 1717 patients were included in the analysis. Of these, 1375 (80%) were treated with systemic therapy, most often in the form of a carboplatin-based doublet (51%) or carboplatin-based doublet with targeted therapy (17%). Overall, 76% of patients received care that was concordant with NCCN Guidelines. Among patients with good performance status (n = 167), the most common reasons for not receiving first-line therapy were that therapy was not recommended (39%) or death occurred before treatment (33%). The most common reason for receiving nonconcordant drug therapy was the administration of pemetrexed or erlotinib before its incorporation into the NCCN Guidelines for first-line therapy (53%). Most patients in this cohort received care that was concordant with NCCN Guidelines. The NSCLC Outcomes Database is a valuable resource for evaluating practice patterns and concordance with NCCN Guidelines among patients with NSCLC.

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Colorectal Cancer Screening

Randall W. Burt, Jamie A. Cannon, Donald S. David, Dayna S. Early, James M. Ford, Francis M. Giardiello, Amy L. Halverson, Stanley R. Hamilton, Heather Hampel, Mohammad K. Ismail, Kory Jasperson, Jason B. Klapman, Audrey J. Lazenby, Patrick M. Lynch, Robert J. Mayer, Reid M. Ness, Dawn Provenzale, M. Sambasiva Rao, Moshe Shike, Gideon Steinbach, Jonathan P. Terdiman, David Weinberg, Mary Dwyer, and Deborah Freedman-Cass

Mortality from colorectal cancer can be reduced by early diagnosis and by cancer prevention through polypectomy. These NCCN Guidelines for Colorectal Cancer Screening describe various colorectal screening modalities and recommended screening schedules for patients at average or increased risk of developing colorectal cancer. In addition, the guidelines provide recommendations for the management of patients with high-risk colorectal cancer syndromes, including Lynch syndrome. Screening approaches for Lynch syndrome are also described.

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Genetic/Familial High-Risk Assessment: Colorectal Version 1.2016, NCCN Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology

Dawn Provenzale, Samir Gupta, Dennis J. Ahnen, Travis Bray, Jamie A. Cannon, Gregory Cooper, Donald S. David, Dayna S. Early, Deborah Erwin, James M. Ford, Francis M. Giardiello, William Grady, Amy L. Halverson, Stanley R. Hamilton, Heather Hampel, Mohammad K. Ismail, Jason B. Klapman, David W. Larson, Audrey J. Lazenby, Patrick M. Lynch, Robert J. Mayer, Reid M. Ness, Scott E. Regenbogen, Niloy Jewel Samadder, Moshe Shike, Gideon Steinbach, David Weinberg, Mary Dwyer, and Susan Darlow

This is a focused update highlighting the most current NCCN Guidelines for diagnosis and management of Lynch syndrome. Lynch syndrome is the most common cause of hereditary colorectal cancer, usually resulting from a germline mutation in 1 of 4 DNA mismatch repair genes (MLH1, MSH2, MSH6, or PMS2), or deletions in the EPCAM promoter. Patients with Lynch syndrome are at an increased lifetime risk, compared with the general population, for colorectal cancer, endometrial cancer, and other cancers, including of the stomach and ovary. As of 2016, the panel recommends screening all patients with colorectal cancer for Lynch syndrome and provides recommendations for surveillance for early detection and prevention of Lynch syndrome-associated cancers.

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NCCN Guidelines Insights: Colorectal Cancer Screening, Version 2.2020

Featured Updates to the NCCN Guidelines

Dawn Provenzale, Reid M. Ness, Xavier Llor, Jennifer M. Weiss, Benjamin Abbadessa, Gregory Cooper, Dayna S. Early, Mark Friedman, Francis M. Giardiello, Kathryn Glaser, Suryakanth Gurudu, Amy L. Halverson, Rachel Issaka, Rishi Jain, Priyanka Kanth, Trilokesh Kidambi, Audrey J. Lazenby, Lillias Maguire, Arnold J. Markowitz, Folasade P. May, Robert J. Mayer, Shivan Mehta, Swati Patel, Shajan Peter, Peter P. Stanich, Jonathan Terdiman, Jennifer Keller, Mary A. Dwyer, and Ndiya Ogba

The NCCN Guidelines for Colorectal Cancer (CRC) Screening describe various colorectal screening modalities as well as recommended screening schedules for patients at average or increased risk of developing sporadic CRC. They are intended to aid physicians with clinical decision-making regarding CRC screening for patients without defined genetic syndromes. These NCCN Guidelines Insights focus on select recent updates to the NCCN Guidelines, including a section on primary and secondary CRC prevention, and provide context for the panel’s recommendations regarding the age to initiate screening in average risk individuals and follow-up for low-risk adenomas.

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Cancer in People Living With HIV, Version 1.2018, NCCN Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology

Erin Reid, Gita Suneja, Richard F. Ambinder, Kevin Ard, Robert Baiocchi, Stefan K. Barta, Evie Carchman, Adam Cohen, Neel Gupta, Kimberly L. Johung, Ann Klopp, Ann S. LaCasce, Chi Lin, Oxana V. Makarova-Rusher, Amitkumar Mehta, Manoj P. Menon, David Morgan, Nitya Nathwani, Ariela Noy, Frank Palella, Lee Ratner, Stacey Rizza, Michelle A. Rudek, Jeff Taylor, Benjamin Tomlinson, Chia-Ching J. Wang, Mary A. Dwyer, and Deborah A. Freedman-Cass

People living with HIV (PLWH) are diagnosed with cancer at an increased rate over the general population and generally have a higher mortality due to delayed diagnoses, advanced cancer stage, comorbidities, immunosuppression, and cancer treatment disparities. Lack of guidelines and provider education has led to substandard cancer care being offered to PLWH. To fill that gap, the NCCN Guidelines for Cancer in PLWH were developed; they provide treatment recommendations for PLWH who develop non–small cell lung cancer, anal cancer, Hodgkin lymphoma, and cervical cancer. In addition, the NCCN Guidelines outline advice regarding HIV management during cancer therapy; drug–drug interactions between antiretroviral treatments and cancer therapies; and workup, radiation therapy, surgical management, and supportive care in PLWH who have cancer.

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Lung Cancer Screening

Douglas E. Wood, George A. Eapen, David S. Ettinger, Lifang Hou, David Jackman, Ella Kazerooni, Donald Klippenstein, Rudy P. Lackner, Lorriana Leard, Ann N. C. Leung, Pierre P. Massion, Bryan F. Meyers, Reginald F. Munden, Gregory A. Otterson, Kimberly Peairs, Sudhakar Pipavath, Christie Pratt-Pozo, Chakravarthy Reddy, Mary E. Reid, Arnold J. Rotter, Matthew B. Schabath, Lecia V. Sequist, Betty C. Tong, William D. Travis, Michael Unger, and Stephen C. Yang

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Colorectal Cancer Screening, Version 1.2015

Dawn Provenzale, Kory Jasperson, Dennis J. Ahnen, Harry Aslanian, Travis Bray, Jamie A. Cannon, Donald S. David, Dayna S. Early, Deborah Erwin, James M. Ford, Francis M. Giardiello, Samir Gupta, Amy L. Halverson, Stanley R. Hamilton, Heather Hampel, Mohammad K. Ismail, Jason B. Klapman, David W. Larson, Audrey J. Lazenby, Patrick M. Lynch, Robert J. Mayer, Reid M. Ness, M. Sambasiva Rao, Scott E. Regenbogen, Moshe Shike, Gideon Steinbach, David Weinberg, Mary A. Dwyer, Deborah A. Freedman-Cass, and Susan Darlow

The NCCN Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology (NCCN Guidelines) for Colorectal Cancer Screening provide recommendations for selecting individuals for colorectal cancer screening, and for evaluation and follow-up of colon polyps. These NCCN Guidelines Insights summarize major discussion points of the 2015 NCCN Colorectal Cancer Screening panel meeting. Major discussion topics this year were the state of evidence for CT colonography and stool DNA testing, bowel preparation procedures for colonoscopy, and guidelines for patients with a positive family history of colorectal cancer.

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NCCN Guidelines Insights: Colorectal Cancer Screening, Version 1.2018

Dawn Provenzale, Samir Gupta, Dennis J. Ahnen, Arnold J. Markowitz, Daniel C. Chung, Robert J. Mayer, Scott E. Regenbogen, Amie M. Blanco, Travis Bray, Gregory Cooper, Dayna S. Early, James M. Ford, Francis M. Giardiello, William Grady, Michael J. Hall, Amy L. Halverson, Stanley R. Hamilton, Heather Hampel, Jason B. Klapman, David W. Larson, Audrey J. Lazenby, Xavier Llor, Patrick M. Lynch, June Mikkelson, Reid M. Ness, Thomas P. Slavin Jr, Shajanpeter Sugandha, Jennifer M. Weiss, Mary A. Dwyer, and Ndiya Ogba

The NCCN Guidelines for Colorectal Cancer (CRC) Screening outline various screening modalities as well as recommended screening strategies for individuals at average or increased-risk of developing sporadic CRC. The NCCN panel meets at least annually to review comments from reviewers within their institutions, examine relevant data, and reevaluate and update their recommendations. These NCCN Guidelines Insights summarize 2018 updates to the NCCN Guidelines, with a primary focus on modalities used to screen individuals at average-risk for CRC.

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NCCN Guidelines Insights: Genetic/Familial High-Risk Assessment: Colorectal, Version 3.2017

Samir Gupta, Dawn Provenzale, Scott E. Regenbogen, Heather Hampel, Thomas P. Slavin Jr, Michael J. Hall, Xavier Llor, Daniel C. Chung, Dennis J. Ahnen, Travis Bray, Gregory Cooper, Dayna S. Early, James M. Ford, Francis M. Giardiello, William Grady, Amy L. Halverson, Stanley R. Hamilton, Jason B. Klapman, David W. Larson, Audrey J. Lazenby, Patrick M. Lynch, Arnold J. Markowitz, Robert J. Mayer, Reid M. Ness, Niloy Jewel Samadder, Moshe Shike, Shajanpeter Sugandha, Jennifer M. Weiss, Mary A. Dwyer, and Ndiya Ogba

The NCCN Guidelines for Genetic/Familial High-Risk Assessment: Colorectal provide recommendations for the management of patients with high-risk syndromes associated with an increased risk of colorectal cancer (CRC). The NCCN Panel for Genetic/Familial High-Risk Assessment: Colorectal meets at least annually to assess comments from reviewers within their institutions, examine relevant data, and reevaluate and update their recommendations. These NCCN Guidelines Insights focus on genes newly associated with CRC risk on multigene panels, the associated evidence, and currently recommended management strategies.

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NCCN Guidelines Insights: Genetic/Familial High-Risk Assessment: Colorectal, Version 2.2019

Featured Updates to the NCCN Guidelines

Samir Gupta, Dawn Provenzale, Xavier Llor, Amy L. Halverson, William Grady, Daniel C. Chung, Sigurdis Haraldsdottir, Arnold J. Markowitz, Thomas P. Slavin Jr, Heather Hampel, CGC, Reid M. Ness, Jennifer M. Weiss, Dennis J. Ahnen, Lee-may Chen, Gregory Cooper, Dayna S. Early, Francis M. Giardiello, Michael J. Hall, Stanley R. Hamilton, Priyanka Kanth, Jason B. Klapman, Audrey J. Lazenby, Patrick M. Lynch, Robert J. Mayer, June Mikkelson, CGC, Shajan Peter, Scott E. Regenbogen, Mary A. Dwyer, CGC, and Ndiya Ogba

Identifying individuals with hereditary syndromes allows for improved cancer surveillance, risk reduction, and optimized management. Establishing criteria for assessment allows for the identification of individuals who are carriers of pathogenic genetic variants. The NCCN Guidelines for Genetic/Familial High-Risk Assessment: Colorectal provide recommendations for the assessment and management of patients with high-risk colorectal cancer syndromes. These NCCN Guidelines Insights focus on criteria for the evaluation of Lynch syndrome and considerations for use of multigene testing in the assessment of hereditary colorectal cancer syndromes.