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Marsha Reyngold, Joyce Niland, Anna ter Veer, Dana Milne, Tanios Bekaii-Saab, Steven J. Cohen, Lily Lai, Deborah Schrag, John M. Skibber, William Small Jr, Martin Weiser, Neal Wilkinson, and Karyn A. Goodman

Based on randomized data, neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy has been incorporated into the NCCN Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology (NCCN Guidelines) for stage II-III rectal cancer. Factors associated with nonadherence to evidence-based guidelines for neoadjuvant radiotherapy (RT) were examined at dedicated cancer centers. The prospective NCCN Oncology Outcomes Database for Colorectal Cancers was queried for patients with stage II-III rectal cancer who underwent a transabdominal surgical resection between September 2005 and June 2012. Multivariable logistic regression was used to identify factors associated with omission of RT. Among 1199 identified patients, 1119 (93%) received neoadjuvant RT, 51 (4%) did not receive RT, and 29 (2%) received adjuvant RT. Among 51 patients not receiving RT, only 19 (37%) were referred and evaluated by a radiation oncologist. On multivariable analysis, clinical factors associated with not receiving RT included a history of prior pelvic RT (adjusted odds ratio [aOR], 23.9; P=.0003), ECOG performance status of 2 or greater (aOR, 11.1; P=.01), tumor distance from the anal verge greater than 10 cm (aOR, 5.4; P=.009), age at diagnosis of 75 years or older (aOR, 4.43; P=.002), body mass index of 25 to 30 kg/m2 and less than 25 kg/m2 (aOR, 5.22 and 4.23, respectively; P=.03), and clinical stage II (aOR, 2.27; P=.02). No significant change was seen in RT use according to diagnosis year, nor was any correlation seen with distance to the nearest RT facility. Concordance with NCCN Guidelines for neoadjuvant RT is high among NCCN Member Institutions. After adjusting for clinical characteristics that increase the risk for RT toxicity, including history of pelvic RT and high comorbidity burden/low functional status, the authors found that non-obese patients of advanced age or those with more favorable clinical features were more likely to not receive RT.

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Quisette P. Janssen, Jacob L. van Dam, Laura R. Prakash, Deesje Doppenberg, Christopher H. Crane, Casper H.J. van Eijck, Susannah G. Ellsworth, William R. Jarnagin, Eileen M. O’Reilly, Alessandro Paniccia, Marsha Reyngold, Marc G. Besselink, Matthew H.G. Katz, Ching-Wei D. Tzeng, Amer H. Zureikat, Bas Groot Koerkamp, Alice C. Wei, and for the Trans-Atlantic Pancreatic Surgery (TAPS) Consortium

Background: The value of neoadjuvant radiotherapy (RT) after 5-fluorouracil with leucovorin, oxaliplatin, and irinotecan, with or without dose modifications [(m)FOLFIRINOX], for patients with borderline resectable (BR) pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is uncertain. Methods: We conducted an international retrospective cohort study including consecutive patients with BR PDAC who received (m)FOLFIRINOX as initial treatment (2012–2019) from the Trans-Atlantic Pancreatic Surgery Consortium. Because the decision to administer RT is made after chemotherapy, patients with metastases or deterioration after (m)FOLFIRINOX or a performance score ≥2 were excluded. Patients who received RT after (m)FOLFIRINOX were matched 1:1 by nearest neighbor propensity scores with patients who did not receive RT. Propensity scores were calculated using sex, age (≤70 vs >70 years), WHO performance score (0 vs 1), tumor size (0–20 vs 21–40 vs >40 mm), tumor location (head/uncinate vs body/tail), number of cycles (1–4 vs 5–8 vs >8), and baseline CA 19-9 level (≤500 vs >500 U/mL). Primary outcome was overall survival (OS) from diagnosis. Results: Of 531 patients who received neoadjuvant (m)FOLFIRINOX for BR PDAC, 424 met inclusion criteria and 300 (70.8%) were propensity score–matched. After matching, median OS was 26.2 months (95% CI, 24.0–38.4) with RT versus 32.8 months (95% CI, 25.3–42.0) without RT (P=.71). RT was associated with a lower resection rate (55.3% vs 72.7%; P=.002). In patients who underwent a resection, RT was associated with a comparable margin-negative resection rate (>1 mm) (70.6% vs 64.8%; P=.51), more node-negative disease (57.3% vs 37.6%; P=.01), and more major pathologic response with <5% tumor viability (24.7% vs 8.3%; P=.006). The OS associated with conventional and stereotactic body RT approaches was similar (median OS, 25.7 vs 26.0 months; P=.92). Conclusions: In patients with BR PDAC, neoadjuvant RT following (m)FOLFIRINOX was associated with more node-negative disease and better pathologic response in patients who underwent resection, yet no difference in OS was found. Routine use of RT cannot be recommended based on these data.

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Margaret A. Tempero, Mokenge P. Malafa, Mahmoud Al-Hawary, Stephen W. Behrman, Al B. Benson III, Dana B. Cardin, E. Gabriela Chiorean, Vincent Chung, Brian Czito, Marco Del Chiaro, Mary Dillhoff, Timothy R. Donahue, Efrat Dotan, Cristina R. Ferrone, Christos Fountzilas, Jeffrey Hardacre, William G. Hawkins, Kelsey Klute, Andrew H. Ko, John W. Kunstman, Noelle LoConte, Andrew M. Lowy, Cassadie Moravek, Eric K. Nakakura, Amol K. Narang, Jorge Obando, Patricio M. Polanco, Sushanth Reddy, Marsha Reyngold, Courtney Scaife, Jeanne Shen, Charles Vollmer Jr., Robert A. Wolff, Brian M. Wolpin, Beth Lynn, and Giby V. George

Pancreatic cancer is the fourth leading cause of cancer-related death among men and women in the United States. A major challenge in treatment remains patients’ advanced disease at diagnosis. The NCCN Guidelines for Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma provides recommendations for the diagnosis, evaluation, treatment, and follow-up for patients with pancreatic cancer. Although survival rates remain relatively unchanged, newer modalities of treatment, including targeted therapies, provide hope for improving patient outcomes. Sections of the manuscript have been updated to be concordant with the most recent update to the guidelines. This manuscript focuses on the available systemic therapy approaches, specifically the treatment options for locally advanced and metastatic disease.