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  • Author: Madison Michael x
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Steven S. Brem, Philip J. Bierman, Henry Brem, Nicholas Butowski, Marc C. Chamberlain, Ennio A. Chiocca, Lisa M. DeAngelis, Robert A. Fenstermaker, Allan Friedman, Mark R. Gilbert, Deneen Hesser, Larry Junck, Gerald P. Linette, Jay S. Loeffler, Moshe H. Maor, Madison Michael, Paul L. Moots, Tara Morrison, Maciej Mrugala, Louis Burt Nabors, Herbert B. Newton, Jana Portnow, Jeffrey J. Raizer, Lawrence Recht, Dennis C. Shrieve, Allen K. Sills Jr, Frank D. Vrionis and Patrick Y. Wen

Overview In 2010, an estimated 22,020 new cases of primary brain and other nervous system neoplasms were diagnosed in the United States,1 and approximately 13,140 deaths occurred from these tumors. The incidence of primary malignant brain tumors has been increasing over the past 30 years, especially in elderly persons.2 Metastatic disease to the central nervous system (CNS) occurs much more frequently, with an estimated incidence approximately 10 times that of primary brain tumors. Between 20% and 40% of patients with systemic cancer will develop brain metastases.3 NOTE: This manuscript highlights only a portion of the NCCN Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology (NCCN Guidelines) for Central Nervous System Cancers. Please refer to www.NCCN.org for the complete NCCN Guidelines. Principles of Management Primary and metastatic brain tumors are a heterogeneous group of neoplasms with varied outcomes and management strategies. Primary brain tumors range from pilocytic astrocytomas, which are very uncommon, noninvasive, and surgically curable, to glioblastoma multiforme, the most common intraparenchymal brain tumor in adults, which is highly invasive and virtually incurable. Likewise, patients with metastatic brain disease may have rapidly progressive systemic disease or no systemic cancer at all. These patients may have one or dozens of brain metastases, and may have a malignancy that is either highly responsive or highly resistant to radiation or chemotherapy. Because of this marked heterogeneity, the prognostic features and treatment options for brain tumors must be carefully reviewed on an individual basis and sensitively communicated to each patient. In addition, CNS tumors are associated with...
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Angel Qin, Songzhu Zhao, Abdul Miah, Lai Wei, Sandipkumar Patel, Andrew Johns, Madison Grogan, Erin M. Bertino, Kai He, Peter G. Shields, Gregory P. Kalemkerian, Shirish M. Gadgeel, Nithya Ramnath, Bryan J. Schneider, Khaled A. Hassan, Nicholas Szerlip, Zoey Chopra, Sara Journey, Jessica Waninger, Daniel Spakowicz, David P. Carbone, Carolyn J. Presley, Gregory A. Otterson, Michael D. Green and Dwight H. Owen

Background: Bone metastases and skeletal-related events (SREs) are a frequent cause of morbidity in patients with metastatic non–small cell lung cancer (mNSCLC). Data are limited on bone metastases and SREs in patients with mNSCLC treated using immune checkpoint inhibitors (ICIs), and on the efficacy of bone-modifying agents (BMAs) in this setting. Here we report the incidence, impact on survival, risk factors for bone metastases and SREs, and impact of BMAs in patients with mNSCLC treated with ICIs in a multi-institutional cohort. Patients and Methods: We conducted a retrospective study of patients with mNSCLC treated with ICIs at 2 tertiary care centers from 2014 through 2017. Overall survival (OS) was compared between patients with and without baseline bone metastases using a log-rank test. A Cox regression model was used to evaluate the association between OS and the presence of bone metastases at ICI initiation, controlling for other confounding factors. Results: We identified a cohort of 330 patients who had received ICIs for metastatic disease. Median patient age was 63 years, most patients were treated in the second line or beyond (n=259; 78%), and nivolumab was the most common ICI (n=211; 64%). Median OS was 10 months (95% CI, 8.4–12.0). In our cohort, 124 patients (38%) had baseline bone metastases, and 43 (13%) developed SREs during or after ICI treatment. Patients with bone metastases had a higher hazard of death after controlling for performance status, histology, line of therapy, and disease burden (hazard ratio, 1.57; 95% CI, 1.19–2.08; P=.001). Use of BMAs was not associated with OS or a decreased risk of SREs. Conclusions: Presence of bone metastases at baseline was associated with a worse prognosis for patients with mNSCLC treated with ICI after controlling for multiple clinical characteristics. Use of BMAs was not associated with reduced SREs or a difference in survival.