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Challenges in the Treatment of Newly Diagnosed and Recurrent Primary Central Nervous System Lymphoma

Matthias Holdhoff, Maciej M. Mrugala, Christian Grommes, Thomas J. Kaley, Lode J. Swinnen, Carlos Perez-Heydrich, and Lakshmi Nayak

Primary central nervous system lymphomas (PCNSLs) are rare cancers of the central nervous system (CNS) and are predominantly diffuse large B-cell lymphomas of the activated B-cell (ABC) subtype. They typically present in the sixth and seventh decade of life, with the highest incidence among patients aged >75 years. Although many different regimens have demonstrated efficacy in newly diagnosed and relapsed or refractory PCNSL, there have been few randomized prospective trials, and most recommendations and treatment decisions are based on single-arm phase II trials or even retrospective studies. High-dose methotrexate (HD-MTX; 3–8 g/m2) is the backbone of preferred standard induction regimens. Various effective regimens with different toxicity profiles can be considered that combine other chemotherapies and/or rituximab with HD-MTX, but there is currently no consensus for a single preferred regimen. There is controversy about the role of various consolidation therapies for patients who respond to HD-MTX–based induction therapy. For patients with relapsed or refractory PCNSL who previously experienced response to HD-MTX, repeat treatment with HD-MTX–based therapy can be considered depending on the timing of recurrence. Other more novel and less toxic regimens have been developed that show efficacy in recurrent disease, including ibrutinib, or lenalidomide ± rituximab. There is uniform agreement to delay or avoid whole-brain radiation therapy due to concerns for significant neurotoxicity if a reasonable systemic treatment option exists. This article aims to provide a clinically practical approach to PCNSL, including special considerations for older patients and those with impaired renal function. The benefits and risks of HD-MTX or high-dose chemotherapy with autologous stem cell transplantation versus other, better tolerated strategies are also discussed. In all settings, the preferred treatment is always enrollment in a clinical trial if one is available.

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Non-Hodgkin's Lymphomas

Andrew D. Zelenetz, Jeremy S. Abramson, Ranjana H. Advani, C. Babis Andreadis, Nancy Bartlett, Naresh Bellam, John C. Byrd, Myron S. Czuczman, Luis E. Fayad, Martha J. Glenn, Jon P. Gockerman, Leo I. Gordon, Nancy Lee Harris, Richard T. Hoppe, Steven M. Horwitz, Christopher R. Kelsey, Youn H. Kim, Ann S. LaCasce, Auayporn Nademanee, Pierluigi Porcu, Oliver Press, Barbara Pro, Nashitha Reddy, Lubomir Sokol, Lode J. Swinnen, Christina Tsien, Julie M. Vose, William G. Wierda, Joachim Yahalom, and Nadeem Zafar

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Non-Hodgkin’s Lymphomas

Andrew D. Zelenetz, Jeremy S. Abramson, Ranjana H. Advani, C. Babis Andreadis, John C. Byrd, Myron S. Czuczman, Luis Fayad, Andres Forero, Martha J. Glenn, Jon P. Gockerman, Leo I. Gordon, Nancy Lee Harris, Richard T. Hoppe, Steven M. Horwitz, Mark S. Kaminski, Youn H. Kim, Ann S. LaCasce, Tariq I. Mughal, Auyporn Nademanee, Pierluigi Porcu, Oliver Press, Leonard Prosnitz, Nashitha Reddy, Mitchell R. Smith, Lubomir Sokol, Lode Swinnen, Julie M. Vose, William G. Wierda, Joachim Yahalom, and Furhan Yunus

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Central Nervous System Cancers, Version 1.2015

Louis Burt Nabors, Jana Portnow, Mario Ammirati, Joachim Baehring, Henry Brem, Paul Brown, Nicholas Butowski, Marc C. Chamberlain, Robert A. Fenstermaker, Allan Friedman, Mark R. Gilbert, Jona Hattangadi-Gluth, Matthias Holdhoff, Larry Junck, Thomas Kaley, Ronald Lawson, Jay S. Loeffler, Mary P. Lovely, Paul L. Moots, Maciej M. Mrugala, Herbert B. Newton, Ian Parney, Jeffrey J. Raizer, Lawrence Recht, Nicole Shonka, Dennis C. Shrieve, Allen K. Sills Jr, Lode J. Swinnen, David Tran, Nam Tran, Frank D. Vrionis, Stephanie Weiss, Patrick Yung Wen, Nicole McMillian, and Anita M. Engh

The NCCN Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology (NCCN Guidelines) for Central Nervous System (CNS) Cancers provide interdisciplinary recommendations for managing adult CNS cancers. Primary and metastatic brain tumors are a heterogeneous group of neoplasms with varied outcomes and management strategies. These NCCN Guidelines Insights summarize the NCCN CNS Cancers Panel's discussion and highlight notable changes in the 2015 update. This article outlines the data and provides insight into panel decisions regarding adjuvant radiation and chemotherapy treatment options for high-risk newly diagnosed low-grade gliomas and glioblastomas. Additionally, it describes the panel's assessment of new data and the ongoing debate regarding the use of alternating electric field therapy for high-grade gliomas.

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NCCN Guidelines® Insights: Central Nervous System Cancers, Version 2.2022

Featured Updates to the NCCN Guidelines

Craig Horbinski, Louis Burt Nabors, Jana Portnow, Joachim Baehring, Ankush Bhatia, Orin Bloch, Steven Brem, Nicholas Butowski, Donald M. Cannon, Samuel Chao, Milan G. Chheda, Andrew J. Fabiano, Peter Forsyth, Pierre Gigilio, Jona Hattangadi-Gluth, Matthias Holdhoff, Larry Junck, Thomas Kaley, Ryan Merrell, Maciej M. Mrugala, Seema Nagpal, Lucien A. Nedzi, Kathryn Nevel, Phioanh L. Nghiemphu, Ian Parney, Toral R. Patel, Katherine Peters, Vinay K. Puduvalli, Jason Rockhill, Chad Rusthoven, Nicole Shonka, Lode J. Swinnen, Stephanie Weiss, Patrick Yung Wen, Nicole E. Willmarth, Mary Anne Bergman, and Susan Darlow

The NCCN Guidelines for Central Nervous System (CNS) Cancers focus on management of the following adult CNS cancers: glioma (WHO grade 1, WHO grade 2–3 oligodendroglioma [1p19q codeleted, IDH-mutant], WHO grade 2–4 IDH-mutant astrocytoma, WHO grade 4 glioblastoma), intracranial and spinal ependymomas, medulloblastoma, limited and extensive brain metastases, leptomeningeal metastases, non–AIDS-related primary CNS lymphomas, metastatic spine tumors, meningiomas, and primary spinal cord tumors. The information contained in the algorithms and principles of management sections in the NCCN Guidelines for CNS Cancers are designed to help clinicians navigate through the complex management of patients with CNS tumors. Several important principles guide surgical management and treatment with radiotherapy and systemic therapy for adults with brain tumors. The NCCN CNS Cancers Panel meets at least annually to review comments from reviewers within their institutions, examine relevant new data from publications and abstracts, and reevaluate and update their recommendations. These NCCN Guidelines Insights summarize the panel’s most recent recommendations regarding molecular profiling of gliomas.

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Non-Hodgkin’s Lymphomas, Version 4.2014

Andrew D. Zelenetz, Leo I. Gordon, William G. Wierda, Jeremy S. Abramson, Ranjana H. Advani, C. Babis Andreadis, Nancy Bartlett, John C. Byrd, Myron S. Czuczman, Luis E. Fayad, Richard I. Fisher, Martha J. Glenn, Nancy Lee Harris, Richard T. Hoppe, Steven M. Horwitz, Christopher R. Kelsey, Youn H. Kim, Susan Krivacic, Ann S. LaCasce, Auayporn Nademanee, Pierluigi Porcu, Oliver Press, Rachel Rabinovitch, Nishitha Reddy, Erin Reid, Ayman A. Saad, Lubomir Sokol, Lode J. Swinnen, Christina Tsien, Julie M. Vose, Joachim Yahalom, Nadeem Zafar, Mary Dwyer, and Hema Sundar

Non-Hodgkin’s lymphomas (NHL) are a heterogeneous group of lymphoproliferative disorders originating in B lymphocytes, T lymphocytes, or natural killer cells. Mantle cell lymphoma (MCL) accounts for approximately 6% of all newly diagnosed NHL cases. Radiation therapy with or without systemic therapy is a reasonable approach for the few patients who present with early-stage disease. Rituximab-based chemoimmunotherapy followed by high-dose therapy and autologous stem cell rescue (HDT/ASCR) is recommended for patients presenting with advanced-stage disease. Induction therapy followed by rituximab maintenance may provide extended disease control for those who are not candidates for HDT/ASCR. Ibrutinib, a Bruton tyrosine kinase inhibitor, was recently approved for the treatment of relapsed or refractory disease. This manuscript discusses the recommendations outlined in the NCCN Guidelines for NHL regarding the diagnosis and management of patients with MCL.

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Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia/Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma, Version 1.2015

Andrew D. Zelenetz, Leo I. Gordon, William G. Wierda, Jeremy S. Abramson, Ranjana H. Advani, C. Babis Andreadis, Nancy Bartlett, John C. Byrd, Myron S. Czuczman, Luis E. Fayad, Richard I. Fisher, Martha J. Glenn, Thomas M. Habermann, Nancy Lee Harris, Richard T. Hoppe, Steven M. Horwitz, Christopher R. Kelsey, Youn H. Kim, Susan Krivacic, Ann S. LaCasce, Auayporn Nademanee, Pierluigi Porcu, Oliver Press, Rachel Rabinovitch, Nishitha Reddy, Erin Reid, Ayman A. Saad, Lubomir Sokol, Lode J. Swinnen, Christina Tsien, Julie M. Vose, Lynn Wilson, Joachim Yahalom, Nadeem Zafar, Mary Dwyer, and Hema Sundar

Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) and small lymphocytic lymphoma (SLL) are different manifestations of the same disease, which are managed in the same way. The advent of novel monoclonal antibodies (ofatumumab and obinutuzumab) led to the development of effective chemoimmunotherapy regimens. The recently approved small molecule kinase inhibitors (ibrutinib and idelalisib) are effective treatment options for CLL in elderly patients with decreased tolerance for aggressive regimens and in patients with poor prognostic features who do not benefit from conventional chemoimmunotherapy regimens. This portion of the NCCN Guidelines for Non-Hodgkin’s Lymphomas describes the recent specific to the incorporation of recently approved targeted therapies for the management of patients with newly diagnosed and relapsed or refractory CLL/SLL.

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Central Nervous System Cancers, Version 2.2014

Louis Burt Nabors, Jana Portnow, Mario Ammirati, Henry Brem, Paul Brown, Nicholas Butowski, Marc C. Chamberlain, Lisa M. DeAngelis, Robert A. Fenstermaker, Allan Friedman, Mark R. Gilbert, Jona Hattangadi-Gluth, Deneen Hesser, Matthias Holdhoff, Larry Junck, Ronald Lawson, Jay S. Loeffler, Paul L. Moots, Maciej M. Mrugala, Herbert B. Newton, Jeffrey J. Raizer, Lawrence Recht, Nicole Shonka, Dennis C. Shrieve, Allen K. Sills Jr, Lode J. Swinnen, David Tran, Nam Tran, Frank D. Vrionis, Patrick Yung Wen, Nicole R. McMillian, and Maria Ho

The NCCN Guidelines for Central Nervous System Cancers provide multidisciplinary recommendations for the clinical management of patients with cancers of the central nervous system. These NCCN Guidelines Insights highlight recent updates regarding the management of metastatic brain tumors using radiation therapy. Use of stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) is no longer limited to patients with 3 or fewer lesions, because data suggest that total disease burden, rather than number of lesions, is predictive of survival benefits associated with the technique. SRS is increasingly becoming an integral part of management of patients with controlled, low-volume brain metastases.

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NCCN Guidelines® Insights: B-Cell Lymphomas, Version 5.2021

Featured Updates to the NCCN Guidelines

Andrew D. Zelenetz, Leo I. Gordon, Julie E. Chang, Beth Christian, Jeremy S. Abramson, Ranjana H. Advani, Nancy L. Bartlett, L. Elizabeth Budde, Paolo F. Caimi, Sven De Vos, Bhagirathbhai Dholaria, Bita Fakhri, Luis E. Fayad, Martha J. Glenn, Thomas M. Habermann, Francisco Hernandez-Ilizaliturri, Eric Hsi, Boyu Hu, Mark S. Kaminski, Christopher R. Kelsey, Nadia Khan, Susan Krivacic, Ann S. LaCasce, Megan Lim, Mayur Narkhede, Rachel Rabinovitch, Praveen Ramakrishnan, Erin Reid, Kenneth B. Roberts, Hayder Saeed, Stephen D. Smith, Jakub Svoboda, Lode J. Swinnen, Joseph Tuscano, Julie M. Vose, Mary A. Dwyer, and Hema Sundar

In the last decade, a better understanding of the molecular pathogenesis of B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphomas has resulted in the development of novel targeted therapies, such as small molecule inhibitors of select kinases in the B-cell receptor pathway, antibody–drug conjugates, and small molecules that target a variety of proteins (eg, CD-19, EZH2, and XPO-1–mediated nuclear export). Anti-CD19 CAR T-cell therapy, first approved for relapsed/refractory (R/R) diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, has also emerged as a novel treatment option for R/R follicular lymphoma and mantle cell lymphoma. These NCCN Guideline Insights highlight the new targeted therapy options included in the NCCN Guidelines for B-Cell Lymphomas for the treatment of R/R disease.

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NCCN Guidelines Insights: Non-Hodgkin's Lymphomas, Version 3.2016

Steven M. Horwitz, Andrew D. Zelenetz, Leo I. Gordon, William G. Wierda, Jeremy S. Abramson, Ranjana H. Advani, C. Babis Andreadis, Nancy Bartlett, John C. Byrd, Luis E. Fayad, Richard I. Fisher, Martha J. Glenn, Thomas M. Habermann, Nancy Lee Harris, Francisco Hernandez-Ilizaliturri, Richard T. Hoppe, Mark S. Kaminski, Christopher R. Kelsey, Youn H. Kim, Susan Krivacic, Ann S. LaCasce, Matthew Lunning, Auayporn Nademanee, Oliver Press, Rachel Rabinovitch, Nishitha Reddy, Erin Reid, Kenneth Roberts, Ayman A. Saad, Lubomir Sokol, Lode J. Swinnen, Julie M. Vose, Joachim Yahalom, Nadeem Zafar, Mary Dwyer, Hema Sundar, and Pierluigi Porcu

Peripheral T-cell lymphomas (PTCLs) represent a relatively uncommon heterogeneous group of non-Hodgkin's lymphomas (NHLs) with an aggressive clinical course and poor prognosis. Anthracycline-based multiagent chemotherapy with or without radiation therapy followed by first-line consolidation with high-dose therapy followed by autologous stem cell rescue (HDT/ASCR) is the standard approach to most of the patients with newly diagnosed PTCL. Relapsed or refractory disease is managed with second-line systemic therapy followed by HDT/ASCR or allogeneic stem cell transplant, based on the patient's eligibility for transplant. In recent years, several newer agents have shown significant activity in patients with relapsed or refractory disease across all 4 subtypes of PTCL. These NCCN Guideline Insights highlight the important updates to the NCCN Guidelines for NHL, specific to the management of patients with relapsed or refractory PTCL.